Upcoming Program: Amandine Gay

Filmmaker

Part of the Tournées Film Festival

Ouvrir la Voix (Speak Up/Make Your Way)

Friday, February 22, 2019
Althouse Hall, Room 106, 5:45 p.m.

Filmmaker Amandine Gay will join us for the showing of Ouvrir la voix (Speak Up/Make Your Way) and for discussion and Q&A. The film is a documentary by and about francophone European black women from the diaspora. Through art, performances, and compelling storytelling, the film focuses on a common experience related to one’s minority status in predominantly white, ex-colonial countries, while highlighting the great diversity of Afropean communities.

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of French & Francophone studies; women’s, gender & sexuality studies; film & media studies; music; history; the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the Office of LGBTQ Services, and the French Club.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Photo Credit: Nathalie_St-Pierre

Photo Credit: Nathalie St-Pierre

Amandine Gay is a Saint-Denis-based filmmaker, speaker and activist. Following her graduation from the Institute of Political Studies in Lyon with a masters in communication, Amandine joined the Conservatory of Dramatic Art in Paris 16 and began performing in theatre, film and television. Since 2012, Amandine has been working as a screenwriter, making her directorial debut in 2014 with her documentary, Speak Up, a feature-length documentary on European Black francophone women. She is also a contributor to the
information website, Slate.fr. In 2015, Amandine authored the preface of the first French translation of bell hooks’ seminal, Ain’t I A Woman. In 2017 Amandine completed her second master’s degree in sociology, focusing on transracial adoption; that same year, she managed the theatrical release of her documentary, Speak Up, in 4 countries (France, Switzerland, Belgium and Canada). She is regularly called as a speaker on afrofeminism,
intersectionality or transracial adoption at universities (UQAM, UOttawa, University of Lausanne, Université Lumière Lyon 2, ERG Brussels, EHESS Paris, etc.) or events such as the Spur Festival. She is also a writer in several collective works: Black Anthology: Adult Adoptees Claim Their Space; Éloge des mauvaises herbes : ce que nous devons à la ZAD or Décolonisons les Arts ! You can follow her in French and English as @OrpheoNegra.

The Clarke Forum’s Semester Theme & Faculty Seminar

Each semester the Clarke Forum devotes a major portion of its resources to programs organized around a semester theme that is also the basis for a faculty seminar. All members of the faculty are invited to propose topics for themes/faculty seminars. Past themes/faculty seminars have included Sexuality and Societies; Living in a World of Limits; The Meanings of Race WaterLanguage; War at Home;  Disability Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States;  Food; Media, Technology & Civic Engagement, Big Data, and Indigeneity in the Americas. The theme/faculty seminar for the spring 2019 semester is Sustainability. If you are interested in proposing a Clarke Forum theme/faculty seminar, please visit Proposing a Clarke Forum Theme/Faculty Seminar.

The Clarke Forum’s Leadership Theme

LEADERSHIP IN AN AGE OF UNCERTAINTY

The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues has established a series of programmatic events dedicated to the theme of leadership in an age of uncertainty. This new initiative is grounded on the reality that today’s generation of Dickinson students confronts a large number of intractable political, economic, and social problems: terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental pollution, global warming, a sustainable energy policy, the ongoing financial crisis, the federal deficit, the amount of public and private debt, the health care crisis, along with issues regarding race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as technology and privacy. These issues and problems directly or indirectly pose challenges to the College and the local community that may in time require fundamental changes in institutions, values, and practices across the public, private, and non-profit sectors of American society. How Dickinsonians respond to these challenges presents us with an opportunity for reflection on the meaning of leadership in the contemporary world. This series is partially supported by a fund created by Betty R. ’58 and Dan Churchill.