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Rick Smolan ’72

New York Times Best-Selling Author and National Geographic Photographer

The Good Fight: America’s Ongoing Struggle for Justice

Friday, April 27,  2018
Althouse Hall, Room 106, 4:30 p.m.

Smolan will share images and stories from his new book The Good Fight. The book captures the sporadically violent, often triumphant, always risky struggles of Americans who have experienced hatred, oppression or bigotry because of their gender, skin color, country of origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability or beliefs over the past 100 years. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Rick Smolan, CEO of Against All Odds Productions is a New York Times best-selling author   with more than five million copies of his books in print.  A former Time, Life, and National Geographic photographer, Smolan is best known as the co-creator of the “Day in the Life” book series.  His global photography projects, which feature the work of hundreds of the worlds leading photographers and combine creative storytelling with state-of-the-art technology, are regularly featured on the covers of prestigious publications around the globe including Fortune, Time, and GEO. His latest book, The Good Fight:  American’s Ongoing Struggle for Justice, is a powerful reminder of how much progress America has made over the past 100 years against hatred, bigotry, racism, misogyny, homophobia and injustice and what’s at risk right now. Smolan has spoken at TED, The Davos World Economic Forum, The Ford Foundation, The Wired Health Conference, TEDMED, Techonomy, DLD in Munich, IdeaCity in Canada, INK in India. His TED talk “Natasha’s Story: An American Homecoming” has been watched by more than a million people.  American 24/7, a New York Times bestseller, enabled thousands of Americans to create a national family album during one ordinary week, and was featured as one of Oprah Winfrey’s “Favorite Things.” In the fall of 2012 Smolan released The Human Face of Big Data focusing on humanity’s new ability to collect, analyze, triangulate and visualize vast amounts of data in real time. The project, sponsored by EMC, Cisco and SAP resulted in a large format book, an iPad app which won a 2013 WEBBY award, and an award-winning PBS TV special. The book was delivered to 10,000 key influencers in 50 countries courtesy of FedEx.  In 2014 the Oscar Winning Producers of The Kings Speech released TRACKS based on Smolan National Geographic cover story about 27-year-old Robyn Davidson’s 1,700 mile nine-month solo camel trek across the treacherous Australian Outback. In the movie Robyn Davidson was portrayed by Mia Wasikowska (Stoker, The Kids are Alright, Alice in Wonderland). Smolan was portrayed by Adam Driver, (Kylo Ren in Star Wars).  Fortune magazine describes Smolan’s company, Against All Odds as “One of the 25 Coolest Companies in America.”

Related Links

  • The Good Fight became one of Amazons top 100 books within a week after it was released and it just sold out of its second printing
  • It was recently featured in New York Times
  • CBS did this terrific segment
  • TED just sent copies to all 1,500 members as the official TED BOOKCLUB selection
  • People Magazine chose it as one of the 10 best gift books of the year
  • The book comes with a free THE GOOD FIGHT VIEWER app that enables readers to point their phones at any one of 63 photographs to immediately stream short compelling videos that expand each story

Video of the Lecture

Stephen Walt

Harvard University

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars Program

Where is U.S. Foreign Policy Headed?

Thursday, April 26, 2018  (Rescheduled from March 22, 2018)
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Watch Live Stream

This lecture explores the future of U.S. foreign policy under President Trump. Walt argues that Trump, his bellicose tweets notwithstanding,  is gradually being captured, coopted, and constrained by the foreign policy establishment. Under Trump, therefore, U.S. foreign policy is likely to be an even more inept version of our recent follies.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Phi Beta Kappa and co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Advising, Political Science and International Studies.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Stephen Walt is Belfer Professor of International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a former academic dean. He also taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago and has been a resident associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution. He is a contributing editor at Foreign Policy, co-chair of the editorial board of International Security, and co-editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs book series. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received the International Studies Association’s Distinguished Senior Scholar award in 2014. His books include The Origins of Alliances; Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy; and The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy. He is currently writing a book about why U.S. foreign policy keeps failing.

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars Program

Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Visiting Scholar Program has been offering  undergraduates the opportunity to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the intellectual life of the institution by making possible an exchange of ideas between the Visiting Scholars and the resident faculty and students.

The Visiting Scholars travel to more than 100 colleges and universities each year, spending two days on each campus and taking full part in the academic life of the institution. They meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the academic community and the general public.

Over the last 60 years, 648 Visiting Scholars have made 5,288 visits to Phi Beta Kappa sheltering institutions.

Founded in 1776, the Phi Beta Kappa Society is the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society. Its mission is to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences, to recognize academic excellence, and to foster freedom of thought and expression.

Video of the Lecture

Dale Bredesen

UCLA and Buck Institute

Reducing the Global Burden of Dementia: The First Alzheimer’s Survivors

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Watch Live Stream

Bredesen describes his treatment for Alzheimer’s and pre-Alzheimer’s, along with associated challenges and implications. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Office of Senior Associate Provost; the Career Center; Pre-Health Society; Pre-Health Program; Division of Student Life;  the Wellness Center; Department of Biology; and the Program in Policy Studies. It was initiated by the Clarke Forum Student Project Managers.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Dale E. Bredesen, M.D. received his undergraduate degree from Caltech and his medical degree from Duke.  He served as resident and chief resident in neurology at UCSF, then was postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Nobel laureate Prof. Stanley Prusiner.  He was a faculty member at UCLA from 1989-1994, then was recruited by the Burnham Institute to direct the Program on Aging.  In 1998 he became the founding president and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, and Adjunct Professor at UCSF; then in 2013 he returned to UCLA as the director of the Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research.

The Bredesen Laboratory studies basic mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative process, and the translation of this knowledge into effective therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, leading to the publication of over 220 research papers. He established the ADDN (Alzheimer’s Drug Development Network) with Dr. Varghese John in 2008, leading to the identification of new classes of therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease.  His group has developed a new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and this approach has led to the discovery of subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease, followed by the first description of reversal of symptoms in patients with MCI and early Alzheimer’s disease, with the ReCODE (reversal of cognitive decline) protocol, published in 2014 and 2016.  His book, The End of Alzheimer’s, is a New York Times Bestseller.

Related Links
CBN: New Alzheimer’s Treatment, Prevention Shows Impressive Results

First Paper 2014: Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program

2016 Paper: Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease

Subtypes: Metabolic profiling distinguishes three subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease

Silicon Valley Health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D5aA_-3Ip8

Video of the Lecture

 

Aloys Mahwa

 Living Peace Institute  – Promundo

Masculine Identity and Sexual Gender Based Violence: The Case of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

Thursday, April 19, 2018
Althouse Hall, Room 106
Noon – 1 p.m. (Light lunch will be provided)
RSVP strongly encouraged, but not required to clarkeforum@dickinson.edu.

Sexual gender-based violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been described as the worst in the world.  Mahwa will discuss ProMundo and Living Peace Institute preventative approaches that engage men, working to eradicate the root causes of violence.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Aloys Mahwa is Promundo’s Living Peace project director in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Using group therapy and group education techniques, the Living Peace initiative addresses the trauma associated with conflict and promotes equitable, nonviolent paths to healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Mahwa manages the scale-up of Living Peace in the North and South Kivu provinces of eastern DRC, playing a key role in coordinating stakeholder working sessions, developing the Living Peace Institute, documenting and building upon the program’s lessons learned and best practices, and supervising monitoring and evaluation of the initiative. Mahwa joined Promundo after five years of experience working with USAID to support Rwandan health financing initiatives.

Mahwa has a master’s degree in project management and anthropology and a master’s degree in managerial economy from the Catholic University of Central Africa. He earned his  bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Jesuit Faculties of Paris.

Reece Jones

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Violent Borders: The State vs. the Right to Move

Monday, April 16, 2018
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Over 40,000 people died trying to cross a border in the past decade around the world. Jones argues these deaths are part of a long history of states using movement restrictions to protect privileges and to contain the poor. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, the Departments of Sociology and International Studies and the Security Studies Certificate Program. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Citizen/Refugee.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Reece Jones is professor of geography at the University of Hawaii and the author two books: Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move (Verso 2016) and Border Walls: Security and the War on Terror in the United States, India, and Israel (Zed Books 2012), four edited books, and over two dozen journal articles. His work has been published in the Guardian, the New York Times, and dozens of other media outlets around the world. He is currently working on a book about racial profiling by the US Border Patrol.

Video of the Lecture

Nicole Guidotti-Hernández

University of Texas at Austin

Latinx: The Future is Now

Thursday, April 12, 2018
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

This lecture charts out the histories of how we went from using Mexican American and Puerto Rican to Chicano and Nuyorican and then to the latest iterations, Latina/o and now Latinx. While millennials are leading the charge with the Latinx conversation, Guidotti-Hernández argues their boomer intellectual forerunners are often outright resistant to the use of Latina/o let alone Latinx, indicating the futurist potential and political necessity of the term.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of English,  American Studies, Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies, and the Women’s & Gender Resource Center. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Citizen/Refugee.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Nicole Guidotti-Hernández is associate professor of American Studies and Mexican American and Latina/o studies at UT Austin. She is an expert in Borderlands History after 1846, Transnational Feminist Methodologies, Latinx Studies, and Popular Culture and Immigration.

Her book titled Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S.  and  Mexican National Imaginaries, Duke University Press (2011) won the 2011-2012 MLA Prize in Chicana/o and Latina/o Literature and was a finalist for the 2012 Berkshire Women’s History First Book Prize and has received many favorable reviews. Her articles such as “Reading Violence, Making Chicana Subjectivities” appear in anthologies such as Techno/futuros: Genealogies, Power, Desire (2007), edited by Nancy Raquel Mirabal and Agustin Lao-Montes. She has also published in journals such as Women’s Studies International Forum, ELN, Social Text, American Quarterly, Cultural Dynamics, The Latin Americanist, and Latino Studies, where her article “Dora the Explorer, Constructing “Latinidades” and the Politics of Global Citizenship” is one of the most downloaded articles in the history of the journal. She is also the co-editor Radical History Review special issue number 123 entitled “Sexing Empire.”

Video of Lecture

Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob – Bechtel Lecturer

Dickinson College

The Bechtel Lecture

(Dis)Owning God: Religious Identity and Violent Extremism in the African Sahel Region

Monday, April 9, 2018
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Religious identity, Jacob argues, has far greater normative influence on extremist recruitment and radicalization than religious beliefs and other appeals, but it has rarely been accounted for in counter-narrative campaigns and deradicalization programs in the West African Sahel region.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Bechtel Lectureship Fund.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob is a visiting international scholar in the International Studies program of Dickinson College.  His teaching and research interest is located at the intersection between communications, conflicts and peace building with particular reference to the Lake Chad Basin, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Jacob visits Dickinson from the American University of Nigeria where he was chair of the Communications & Multimedia Design Program and interim dean in the School of Arts & Science. He has led the implementation of some very important donor-funded projects in support of peace building in North-East Nigeria and the Lake Chad region including a U.S. State Department-funded CVE project on peace journalism, involving training and working with a network of journalists, editors and influencers to facilitate a more nuanced media coverage of the Boko Haram insurgency.  He is the author of Convincing Rebel Fighters to Disarm: UN Information Operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DeGruyter 2017). Jacob earned his Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Leeds, United Kingdom.  He has held a visiting position at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, where he initiated the research project on religious identity and violent extremism.

Bechtel Lectureship

This lectureship was established in honor of Joan Bechtel (Library Resources) and late emeriti faculty Dan Bechtel (Religion) to support speakers and events regarding Africa at the Clarke Forum.

Video of the Lecture

Beyond Kinetics: Advancing Civil-Military Partnership in Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism

Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 6 p.m.

Panelists

Muhammad Umer Bashir, Pakistan Army
Shawn Diniz ’18, Dickinson College
Margee Ensign, Dickinson College
Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob, Dickinson College
Casey  Miner, United States Army
Yssouf Traore, Mali Army

ISIS and its affiliate organizations have recently suffered significant military losses in Syria, Iraq, North and West Africa as well as the broader Lake Chad Region. As important as these military achievements are, they signal neither the end of ISIS and its affiliates nor the defeat of their extremist ideologies. Instead, they usher in an increasingly diffuse and unpredictable phase in the global war on terror. This panel discussion explores how the United States, Pakistan, Mali and Nigeria have experienced and learned from the changing phases of extremism, focusing mainly on what has worked and what hasn’t.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues in collaboration with the Carlisle Scholars Program at the U.S. Army War College.

Biographies from our Panelists

Brigadier Muhammad Umer Bashir is an artillery officer in the Army of Pakistan. He has commanded at the Regiment and Brigade levels, and performed as an instructor at the Pakistan National Defence University and Command and Staff College. Brigadier Bashir deployed to Morocco as an United Nations peace keeper. He has completed the National Security and Warfare Course and Command and Staff Course. He has earned a master of philosophy in public policy and governance and a master of science in art and science of warfare.  His recent deployments include planning, coordinating and conducting operations against terrorists, as well as rehabilitation of internally displaced persons and de-radicalization initiatives of Pakistan Army and affiliates.

Shawn Diniz ’18 is a senior at Dickinson College majoring in  international studies (security studies concentration) and a minor in Spanish. This entails courses in national/international security, business management, and pressing world issues. Diniz is a member of the men’s varsity tennis team, of which he has been captain for the past two years.  Diniz obtained two internships while at Dickinson; the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and Creative Associates International, a development contractor, in Washington D.C.  These experiences coupled with his studies abroad at the University of Malaga, in southern Spain, help to enhance his worldview and aid in his assessment of geopolitical hotspots.

Margee Ensign became Dickinson’s 29th president on July 1, 2017. Prior to Dickinson she served for seven years as the president of the American University of Nigeria (AUN), a young, private university based on the U.S model of university education. There she oversaw the building of the sustainable campus, the creation of the finest digital library on the continent, the establishment of a law school as well as a graduate school, and a very active program of community engagement and humanitarian assistance. Pres. Ensign also co-founded the Adamawa Peace Initiative, a locally based response to the threat from Boko Haram violence, which successfully promoted peace in the area, and assisted close to 300,000 refugees for three years.

Pres. Ensign left her California home for New College in Florida where she received her B.A. in peace studies and international relations. She went on to earn her master’s and Ph.D. in international political economy from the University of Maryland. From there she proceeded to teach at Columbia University where she was an assistant professor of both economics and political science while serving as the director of the International Political Economy program. Moving to Washington DC, she assumed the role of director of the USAID’s development program through Tulane University, then diving into full-time university administration at the University of the Pacific where she was dean of the School of International Studies and associate provost for international initiatives.

The author and editor of four books, including Rwanda: History and Hope and Doing Good or Doing Well? Japan’s Foreign Aid Program, she has presented at the World Economic Forum, been interviewed multiple times by the BBC and CNN, written for The Washington Post, is a blogger for The Huffington Post, and has testified before Congress on international affairs, defense and foreign assistance.

Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob is a visiting international scholar in the international studies program of Dickinson College. His teaching and research interest is located at the intersection between communications, conflicts and peace building with particular reference to the Lake Chad Basin, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Jacob visits Dickinson from the American University of Nigeria where he was chair of the Communications & Multimedia Design Program and interim dean in the School of Arts & Science. He has led the implementation of some very important donor-funded projects in support of peace building in North-East Nigeria and the Lake Chad region including a U.S. State Department-funded CVE project on peace journalism, involving training and working with a network of journalists, editors and influencers to facilitate a more nuanced media coverage of the Boko Haram insurgency.  He is the author of Convincing Rebel Fighters to Disarm: UN Information Operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DeGruyter 2017). Jacob earned his Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Leeds, United Kingdom.

Lieutenant Colonel Casey Miner, Ed.D., is an Army officer from Manhattan Beach, California, with over 27 years of service. He is currently a student at the Army War College in the Carlisle Scholars Program focusing on preventing violent extremism and youth identity. He recently completed an interagency fellowship with USAID where he served as the Kyrgyzstan desk officer, helped develop the Asia CVE strategy, and collaborated with the youth coordinator on the Strategic Youth security issues. Along with assignments in intelligence, logistics and strategic communications, he served as a command inspector general in Afghanistan where he developed a senior level resiliency program to prevent at-risk behavior and a strategy for organizational leaders to address negative deployment trends. His assignment as the aide-de-camp to the chief of the Army Reserve took him to 30 countries for security cooperation and capacity building engagements, strategic meetings with heads of armed forces and meetings on Capitol Hill. He deployed as part of the United Nations Protection Force in 1994 to the Former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia. Casey’s doctoral research at UCLA focused on connecting conceptual knowledge to practical application to better prepare youth for adulthood. He speaks at national education conferences and advises school districts. Casey graduated from the University of Southern California with an undergraduate degree in Political Science with minors in History and Peace and Conflict Studies. He is a Paul Harris Fellow and his awards include two bronze star medals.

Lieutenant Colonel Yssouf Traore is an international fellow of the United States Army War College. He received his commission as an infantry officer from the French Military Academy of Saint-cyr  in 2001. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, The Airborne School, Commando School of Montlouis, Command and General Staff College.  Prior to his arrival at Carlisle Barracks, he was assigned to Malian 33rd Airborne Regiment, where among other jobs he served as the company commander, operations officer and regiment commander. He also served as a operations officer in the Tuareg battalion and the commanding officer of the Malian airborne taskforce during the Sabre, Serval and Maliba operations with allied forces from 2013 to 2015 in northern Mali. Colonel Traore holds a master of international security studies from the Pierre Mendes France University. His awards and decorations include the Medaille de campagne Djiguitougou, Medaille de campagne Badinko, Medaille de campagne Maliba, Medaille des blesses, Medaille d’or de la defense nationale, the Parachutist Badge, the jumpmaster badge, the commando Badge Tab.

 

Related Web Links

Boko Haram, Diffusion of Terror

We are Obsessed with Peace

Silencing Boko Haram

Role of Women in Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) 

The Military’s Role in Countering Violent Extremism (CVE)

Video of the Discussion

 

Seeing = Believing?

Tuesday, April 3, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Eitan Grinspun, Columbia University
Steven Malcic, Dickinson College
Tabitha Peck, Davidson College
Graham Roberts, The New York Times
Gregory Steirer (moderator), Dickinson College

Where is computer-generated imaging and sound technology, including virtual reality, going next? Our panel of experts will discuss new developments in these technologies and what they mean for the politics of media production and consumption.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of English; International Business & Management; Philosophy; the Film Studies Program; and the Churchill Fund. This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Eitan Grinspun is associate professor of computer science and applied mathematics at Columbia University, and co-director of the Columbia Computer Graphics Group. He was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and NSF CAREER Award recipient, NVIDIA Fellow and a Caltech Everhart Distinguished Lecturer. Prior to joining Columbia University, he was a research scientist at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences from 2003-2004, a doctoral student from the California Institute of Technology until 2003, and an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. He was profiled in The New York Times, Popular Science (“Brilliant 10 Scientists of 2011”), Fast Company (“Most Creative People in Business 2013”), Scientific American, New Scientist, and mentioned in Variety. The NSF-funded technologies developed by his laboratory are found in Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator, major film studios including Disney, Pixar, and Weta Digital, and condensed matter physics laboratories. His film credits include The Hobbit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Steven Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin.

Steven Malcic is a visiting assistant professor of film and media studies in the Department of English at Dickinson College, specializing in the areas of media infrastructures, media industries, internet history, and digital culture. His work focuses on the relationship between identity and digital media, having published articles in internationally refereed journals including the Internet Policy Review, Convergence, and the Journal of Information Policy. In 2014, he co-authored a comparative analysis of digital policy in the US and E.U., which was presented to the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, D.C. Malcic holds a Ph.D. in film and media studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Tabitha Peck is a professor of mathematics and computer science at Davidson College. She completed her Ph.D. in computer science from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2010 and has worked in numerous virtual reality research labs including the Palo Alto Research Center and the Experimental Virtual Environments (EVENT) Lab for Neuroscience at the University of Barcelona. Her research interests include the psychological implications of fully immersive body-swap illusions, including implications of racism and stereotype threat, and locomotion interfaces in virtual environments. She is an associate editor for Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments and serves on the ACM SIGGRAPH education committee and the IEEE Virtual Reality program committee.

Graham Roberts, director of immersive platforms storytelling at The New York Times,  leads an innovation team that explores new approaches in video, motion graphics, and virtual/augmented reality. This includes co-direction of editorial for NYT VR. He has received recognition for his work from a number of award-giving bodies, including the Society of News Design, the Emmy’s, the Edward R. Murrow Awards and the Pulitzer Awards. He also teaches at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, Jessica Ferri, a writer and singer and creator of Dearly Departed, their son Roman, and dog Ralphie whose interests include squirrels and skateboards.

Gregory Steirer is an assistant professor of English and film studies at Dickinson College. His scholarship, which has appeared in a variety of journals and edited collections, including Convergence, Postmodern Culture, and Television and New Media, focuses on the technologies, business practices, and regulatory structures of twentieth and twenty-first century media systems. He has served three times as a researcher for the Connected Viewing Initiative of the Carsey-Wolf Center in Santa Barbara and has received a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2017-18 in support of his monograph on intellectual property law and the history of the narrative-based franchise.

Related Links

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-23709836

Video of the Discussion

Yoko Tawada

 Award-Winning Writer

An Evening with Yoko Tawada

Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Known internationally for her novels, poems and essays in German and Japanese, author Yoko Tawada creates worlds in which foreigners, outsiders and animals, always aware of their strangeness, navigate and read their surroundings with wonder and minuteness. Tawada will collaborate with Bettina Brandt (Pennsylvania State University) in a multilingual performance which includes German and Japanese as well as English translations. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of German; East Asian Studies; English; the Max Kade Foundation; and the Flaherty Lecture Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Citizen/Refugee.

Biography (forthcoming)

Yoko Tawada was born in Tokyo in 1960, educated at Waseda University and has lived in Germany since 1982, where she received her Ph.D. in German literature. She received the prestigious Akutagawa Prize for The Bridegroom Was a Dog. She writes in both German and Japanese, and in 1996, she won the Adalbert-von-Chamisso Prize, a German award recognizing foreign writers for their contributions to German culture. She also received the Goethe-Medal, an official decoration of the Federal Republic of Germany and the prestigious Kleist Prize (2016).

Related Links

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/30/magazine/yoko-tawada.html

https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/yoko-tawadas-magnificent-strangeness

Video of the Presentation

Ajuan Mance

Mills College

The 1001 Black Men Online Sketchbook and the Art of Social Justice

Wednesday, March 7, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Mance created 1001 Black Men: An Online Sketchbook as a reaction against the controlling images that have limited and defined media representations of Black men. Mance will use a slideshow of images from her series as the basis of a wide ranging discussion of art, Black maleness and gender performance, and representation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center; the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity; and the Departments of Africana Studies; American Studies; English; French; and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Ajuan Mance is a professor of English at Mills College in Oakland, California. She holds degrees from Brown University and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. A lifelong artist, she works in acrylic on paper and canvas, ink on paper and, for the 1001 Black Men project, ink on paper and digital collage. Ajuan has participated in solo and group exhibitions throughout the San Francisco Bay Area as well as at the University of Oregon, the Woman Made Gallery in Chicago, and the Brainworks Gallery in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in several digital and print media outlets, including, most recently, Transition, Cog, Buzzfeed.com, NPR,org, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The New York Times. A professor of English at Mills College in Oakland, California, Ajuan is partly inspired by her teaching and research in U.S. Black literature and history. In both her scholarly writing and her visual art, Ajuan explores race and gender, and the literature, lives, and locations, in which they intersect. She is the author of two scholarly books, Inventing Black Women: African American Women’s Poetry and Self-Representation, 1877-2000 and Before Harlem: An Anthology of African American Literature from the Long Nineteenth Century, both from the University of Tennessee Press. She is also the author of several comics and zines, including A Blues for Black Santa, The Ancestors’ Juneteenth, and The Little Book of Big, Black Bears. Gender Studies, her autobiographical comic book series, uses humor to explore her experiences as a Black nerd navigating the complexities of gender.

Video of the Lecture

 

 

Martin Burt and Margee Ensign

Martin Burt, Fundación Paraguaya
Margee Ensign, Dickinson College

A Conversation with President Margee Ensign and Global Entrepreneur Martin Burt

Monday, February 26, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Ensign and Burt will discuss what it means to be a social entrepreneur; ways to envision a life in the areas of social innovation, advocacy, and social change; and the possibilities of entrepreneurship as a mechanism for reducing poverty.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship (SINE) Certificate Program and the Department of International Business & Management. This program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the speakers)

Martin Burt is founder (1985) and CEO of Fundación Paraguaya, a 33-year old NGO devoted to the promotion of entrepreneurship and economic self-reliance to eliminate poverty around the world. He is a pioneer in applying new poverty metrics, microfinance, micro-franchise, youth entrepreneurship, financial literacy and technical vocational methodologies to address chronic poverty around the world. He has developed one of the world’s first financially self-sufficient agricultural and tourism high schools for the rural poor. He is co-founder of Teach a Man to Fish, a global network based in London (3000 members-150 countries) that promotes “education that pays for itself” and which is partnering with more than 50 organizations from 27 countries to establish self-sufficient schools, mostly in rural areas. He has also developed the Poverty Stoplight, a new poverty measurement tool and coaching methodology that assists families to self-diagnose their level of multidimensional poverty and develop customized plans to eliminate poverty. This new metric is now being implemented in more than 30 countries by more than 100 organizations, including the U.S. and the UK.  Burt is currently a member of the board of directors of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship at the World Economic Forum and of the Global Foodbanking Network. In public service, he has served as chief of staff to the president of Paraguay, was elected mayor of Asunción, and was appointed vice minister of commerce. Burt has books published on economics, development, municipal government, poetry, and education and has received numerous awards. He holds a Ph.D. from Tulane University Law School and is a visiting professor of social entrepreneurship at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and distinguished visiting professor at University of California, Irvine. Martin Burt was born in Asunción, Paraguay in 1957 where he resides with his family.

Margee M. Ensign became Dickinson College’s 29th president on July 1, 2017. Prior to Dickinson she served for seven years as president of the American University of Nigeria (AUN), a young, private university focused on development based on the U.S. model of university education. There, she oversaw the building of the sustainable campus, the creation of the finest digital library on the continent, and a very active program of community engagement and humanitarian assistance. AUN is located in Yola, the capital of Adamawa state, one of the three northeastern Nigerian states that have been under a state of emergency because of the Boko Haram insurgency. To deal with the crisis, Ensign co-founded and led the Adamawa Peace Initiative (API), a Yola-based response to the escalating violence, which successfully promoted peace in the area through education, empowerment and community development while feeding 300,000 refugees fleeing the fighting to the north.

Ensign has been internationally recognized for her pioneering work at AUN, including receiving the 2011 African Leadership Award in Educational Excellence, granted by London-based African Leadership Magazine. Rotary International made her a Paul Harris Fellow in 2012. In 2014, Ensign received the African Leadership Award from the World Centre for Corporate Social Responsibility. In 2015, the Women of Jama’atul Nasril Islam in Nigeria recognized her for her contributions to leadership, philanthropy, and education of women and girls in northeast Nigeria. She also received an honorary degree from the American University of Paris for her pioneering academic and humanitarian work.

Ensign worked in Africa for 15 years and served as an advisor to the governments of Uganda and Rwanda. She is a widely published scholar whose work focuses primarily on the challenges of international development as well as on the implications of development assistance. She co-authored Rwanda: History and Hope, co-edited Confronting Genocide in Rwanda and is the author of Doing Good or Doing Well? Japan’s Foreign Aid Program and Images and Behavior of Private Bank Lending to Developing Countries.

Prior to AUN, Ensign served as dean of the School of International Studies and associate provost for international initiatives at the University of the Pacific in California. At Pacific, she set up undergraduate and graduate programs in social entrepreneurship, inter-American studies and intercultural relations. She also established the Gerber Lecture Series that attracted such globally renowned speakers as Archbishop (emeritus) Desmond Tutu of South Africa, President Michelle Bachelet from Chile, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda, Vice-President Gilbert Bukenya of Uganda, President César Gaviria of Colombia, and Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland of Norway.

Ensign earned her B.A. from New College in Florida and her Ph.D. in international political economy from the University of Maryland. She began her academic and administrative career at Columbia University in New York City. There, she was both assistant professor of politics and economics and director of the international political economy program.

From Columbia, she became director of USAID’s development studies program at Tulane University and a professor at Tulane’s international development program, offering advanced programs at the master’s and Ph.D. levels in international development. She also has taught as visiting professor at Georgetown University and American University in Washington, D.C.

Video of the Discussion

 

Margot Canaday

Princeton University

Pink Precariat: LGBT Workers in the Shadow of Civil Rights

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

This talk – part of a larger book project that centers the workplace in queer history – offers a preliminary ethnography of LGBTs working in mainstream occupations during the American economy’s “golden age” of the 1950s and 1960s.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of English; American Studies; and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies. It also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Citizen/Refugee.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Margot Canaday is a legal and political historian who studies gender and sexuality in modern America. She holds a B.A. from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Her first book, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth Century America (Princeton, 2009), won the Organization of American Historians’ Ellis Hawley Prize, the American Political Science Association’s Gladys M. Kammerer Award (co-winner), the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero Prize, the American Society for Legal History’s Cromwell Book Prize, the Committee on LGBT History’s John Boswell Prize, the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies, as well as the Association of American Law Schools’ Order of the Coif Biennial Book Award. Canaday has won fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the Princeton University Society of Fellows, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. With Thomas Sugrue, Glenda Gilmore, Michael Kazin, and Stephen Pitti, she is co-editor of the series Politics and Culture in Modern America at the University of Pennsylvania Press.

Komozi Woodard ’71

Sarah Lawrence College

The Strange Career of the Jim Crow North: A Dickinson Story?

Tuesday, February 20, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

In the 1960s, the Congress of African Students at Dickinson College began the study of the Strange Career of the Jim Crow North with the early development of Africana Studies and the Black Arts Movement. This is the story of those Dickinson roots.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Waidner-Spahr Library; the Division of Student Life; and the Departments of History; Africana Studies; American Studies; Sociology; and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Komozi Woodard ’71 is professor of history, public policy and Africana studies at Sarah Lawrence College; he attended Princeton, Andover, Dickinson, the New School, Rutgers, Northwestern University and the University of Pennsylvania. Woodard was managing editor of Unity & Struggle and Black Newark newspaper and radio program in the Black Power Movement, Main Trend journal in the Black Arts Movement and Manhattan’s Children’s Express before writing and editing these: A Nation within a Nation: Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) and Black Power Politics; The Making of the New Ark; The Black Power Movement: Amiri Baraka from Black Arts to Black Radicalism, Freedom North, Groundwork, Black Power 50 and Want to Start a Revolution: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle?.

Komozi Woodard & Jeanne Theoharis curate Conversations in Black Freedom Studies at the Schomburg Center for Culture and Research in Harlem.

Video of the Lecture

Emma Howard

Performer and Writer

I’m Smiling Because I’m Uncomfortable

Friday, February 16, 2018
Adams Hall, Basement Kitchen, 4:30 p.m.

Why do we eat? Why do we stop eating? This one woman show is an autobiographical story traveling from early childhood experiences of queerness and lessons on body image, to a college eating disorder, to the present challenges of eating and living in a human body.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and is part of Love Your Body Week programming.

Biography (provided by the guest)

Emma Howard (Performer, Writer) is a recent graduate from the Experimental Theatre Wing at Tisch School of the Arts. Most of her work addresses eating and mental illness. When not writing or performing, she works for a non-profit theatre organization called The Possibility Project. To pay rent, she works at an overpriced vegan fast food restaurant that caters to a lot of men at JP Morgan. She is interested in one day becoming a medical and humanitarian clown and using physical comedy to tackle body image issues. Her favorite food to binge on is peanut butter granola.

 

Substantia Jones

Founder and Photographer, The Adipositivity Project

The Adipositivity Project

Wednesday, February 14, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Jones discusses (and displays) a decade of body politics activism promoting fat acceptance and physical autonomy by subverting that most commonly used tool of what she calls the angst industrial complex: photography.

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by The Trout Gallery. This program is also part of Love Your Body Week programming.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Substantia Jones is the founder and Photographer of The Adipositivity Project.  Jones’ work has been included in art exhibitions at the Tate Modern in London, the Steirischer Herbst Arts Festival in Graz, Austria, Lesbiche in Sardinia, Italy, and in a two-month solo exhibition of her photographs at Te Manawa Museum in New Zealand. She’s also been featured in VICE News, Glamour Magazine, US News & World Report, Cosmopolitan, BUST, MIC.com, Huffington Post, Bustle, Mashable, The Establishment, on numerous podcasts and radio broadcasts, and in a TIME magazine video profile of Jones and The Adipositivity Project. She hopes to soon produce a book of her photographs, and looks forward to another decade of The Adipositivity Project.

Video of the Lecture

 

Food Access & Poverty

Thursday, February 8, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Alyssa Feher, Tapestry of Health
Becca Raley ’94 (moderator), Partnership for Better Health
Risa Waldoks ’12, The Food Trust
Robert Weed ’80, Project Share

Food security allows all people to have access to regular, culturally appropriate food sources to ensure a healthy existence. Increased reliance on national and state food assistance programs reflect rising poverty and food insecurity in our community. Panelists will discuss both the systemic nature of persistent poverty and food insecurity and innovations designed to address these root concerns.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Department of Environmental Studies, the Center for Sustainability Education, the Food Studies Program, Partnership for Better Health and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Alyssa Feher has served as the director of the Tapestry of Health WIC Program servicing Cumberland, Perry, Mifflin, and Juniata counties since 2011.  Feher is responsible for overseeing clinic operations and works frequently with clients needing assistance from multiple agencies.  She previously served as the human resources manager for a non-profit medical facility. Feher has a B.A. in political science from Shippensburg University and a M.A. in organizational leadership from Mansfield University.

Becca Raley ’94 is the executive director of the Partnership for Better Health where she oversees the foundation’s strategic direction and community investments to improve the health of the people and communities in our region. Raley serves as the organization’s lead spokesperson, advocates for effective policies, cultivates community partnerships, develops new public health initiatives and ensures sound fiscal and human resource management.

Prior to joining the foundation in 2009, Becca worked as director of institutional advancement and senior research associate at Public/Private Ventures (P/PV), a national nonprofit think tank. At P/PV, she designed new projects across the fields of youth programming, community health, workforce development and crime reduction. With 10 years of experience in applied research, Becca’s expertise includes directing multi-method program evaluations, securing and managing philanthropic grants, supporting demonstration projects and providing technical assistance to promising social programs. She has written and contributed to numerous research reports on the effectiveness of community-based programs for youth, young adults and seniors.

Becca serves on the Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center’s Advisory Council and is a board member of the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank, the state’s largest nonprofit food distribution organization serving 27 counties. She is an active member of the Pennsylvania Health Funders Collaborative and serves on numerous local coalitions including the Greater Carlisle Project, the Cumberland County State Health Improvement Partnership and the Perry County Health Coalition. She was appointed to Dickinson College’s Presidential Commission on Community and Civic Learning & Engagement. She served on the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner’s 2017 Consumer Health Literacy Work Group and is past chair of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Cancer Prevention and Control’s Stakeholder Leadership Team. She has led foundation initiatives focused on addressing the region’s opioid epidemic, end-of-life planning, rural health access, postpartum depression, chronic disease prevention, and health policy advocacy. Becca graduated cum laude from Dickinson College and holds a master’s degree in sociology from Temple University.

Risa Waldoks ’12 is a project manager with The Food Trust’s National Campaign for Healthy Food Access. In this role, she brings together community residents, policymakers, public health and economic development leaders, grocers, farmers, foundations and other diverse partners in order to advance equity across the country. She lives in Philadelphia, where she is engaged in an array of food and social justice organizations, and she completed the city’s Citizen Planning Institute. Risa graduated from Dickinson College in 2012, and she majored in Policy Management and Political Science.

Robert Weed ’80, interim-CEO of Project Share, is a seasoned business leader, coach, and organizational change agent.  With almost 35 years’ experience in the Retail Banking industry, Bob has built the skills necessary to guide and lead teams through organizational and cultural reorganizations and systems integrations.  Weed has a record of successfully leading teams through integrations during bank mergers, including the PNC acquisition of Sterling Financial and PNC’s acquisition of NCC.  He also has experience in reorganizational activities and strategic tactical execution with Summit Bank and CoreStates Bank.

Weed earned his B.S.  in political science and psychology from Dickinson College.  He received his MBA with a concentration in human resource management from American University.  Bob has obtained coaching certification through various organizations and is a Gallup Great Workplace Award winner.

Related Resources

Articles

Web Resources

Books

Video of the Lecture

 

Christopher S. Parker

University of Washington, Seattle

2018 MLK Jr. & Black History Month Symposium

Donald Trump, Race, and the Crisis of American Democracy

Monday, February 5, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

The Democratic Party likes to make the argument that Trump can be defeated by wooing working-class whites. A classed-based strategy must be scrapped in favor of one that emphasizes race.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Christopher S. Parker is Stuart A. Scheingold Professor of Social Justice and Political Science in the department of political science at the University of Washington, Seattle. After serving in the military for a total of ten years, and another five as a probation officer for Los Angeles County, Parker attended UCLA. He then earned his doctorate at the University of Chicago. Parker is the author of Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America (Princeton). Parker’s award-winning first book, Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South, was also published by Princeton University Press. He resides in Seattle.

Video of the Lecture

Gabriela González

Louisiana State University

The Glover Memorial Lecture
Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

Monday, January 29. 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.
(360 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA)

More than a billion years ago, the merger of two black holes produced gravitational waves  that were observed traveling through Earth on September 14, 2015. The talk will explain how Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves more than one hundred years ago, and describe the latest exciting discoveries with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Glover Memorial Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by department of physics & astronomy and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Gabriela González is a physicist working on the discovery of gravitational waves with The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) team.  She was born in Córdoba, Argentina, studied physics at the University of Córdoba, and pursued her Ph.D. in Syracuse University, obtained in 1995. She worked as a staff scientist in the LIGO group at MIT until 1997, when she joined the faculty at Penn State. In 2001 she joined the faculty at Louisiana State University, where she is a professor of physics and astronomy. She has received awards from the American Physical Society, the American Astronomical Society and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and is a fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has been a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration since it was funded in 1997, served as the elected LSC spokesperson in 2011-2017, and is known for participating in the announcement of the discovery of gravitational waves in 2016.  Her work has focused on LIGO instrument development (especially reducing noise sources and tuning alignment systems) and LIGO data calibration and diagnostics, critical to increasing the astrophysical reach of data analysis methods.

The Glover Memorial Lecture

The Glover Memorial Lectures are usually presented in alternate years. This lectureship in science was established in 1958 in memory of John Glover of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, the inventor of the Glover Tower, and in memory of his son and grandson, Henry and Lester Glover, by the late Dr. John D. Yeagley and Mrs. Blanche Yeagley of York, Pennsylvania. Recent Glover Lectures include Peter Brancazio’s “Sports on the Moon,” Clint Sprott on “The New Science of Chaos,” Dr. Dorrit Hoffleit’s presentation on “A Century of Women in Astronomy,” Lawrence Krauss’ lecture on “The Physics of Star Trek,” Albert Bartlett’s lecture on “Arithmetic, Population, and Energy,” David Lee’s lecture on “Superconductivity and Superfluidity: A Century of Discovery”and Rush Holt’s lecture on “Advancing Science.”

Video of the Lecture