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Feminist Sorority Women: A Place for Intersectionality in Tradition?

Thursday, November 29, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Donna Bickford (moderator), Dickinson College
Brontè Burleigh-Jones, Dickinson College
Diana Turk, New York University
Deborah Whaley, University of Iowa

Sororities can be both a place for women’s empowerment and a site that produces elitism and constructs stereotypical gender roles. This student-initiated panel of experts will address the history of sororities and the possibilities for activism within them.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of English, American studies, philosophy, sociology, women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the First Year Seminar Program, the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, Kappa Delta Pi, and the Churchill Fund. This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Donna M. Bickford has served as the director of the Women’s and Gender Resource Center at Dickinson since January 2016. She also teaches in women’s, gender and sexuality studies and serves as co-chair of the President’s Commission on Women, Gender and Sexuality. Previously she was the director of the Carolina Women’s Center and associate director of the Office for Undergraduate Research at UNC-Chapel Hill. Prior to UNC, she was on faculty in the women’s studies program at the University of Rhode Island. She taught as a Fulbright Scholar at Åbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland.

Bickford earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rhode Island. Her research interests are in the connections between literature and social justice, and contemporary U.S. women writers. A co-edited anthology, University and College Women’s and Gender Equity Centers, is forthcoming in August from Routledge, and her book Understanding Marge Piercy is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2019.

Brontè Burleigh-Jones serves as the vice president for finance and administration at Dickinson College where she oversees all areas of finance and campus operations, including Facilities Management, Dining Services, Human Resource Services, Financial Operations, Conferences and Special Events, Bookstore, Mail Center and Children’s Center.  Burleigh-Jones was recently presented with the 2017 Professional Development Award from the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) at its annual meeting in Minneapolis. She received the award for extensive volunteer service to the association’s professional development activities and publications programs.

Burleigh-Jones is a frequent presenter on a variety of topics, including finance, accreditation, communication, leadership and diversity at NACUBO, American Council of Education (ACE) and Association of Governing Boards (AGB) conferences. She is a frequent author for NACUBO’s Business Officer magazine and, in 2015, presented the “CBO Speaks” podcast, which remains the most downloaded from NACUBO’s website.

Burleigh-Jones has more than 25 years of experience in financial and facilities management in higher education in addition to project management and auditing experience in the state government and nonprofit sectors. Before joining Dickinson in 2013, she served as treasurer of St. John’s College. Previous leadership positions also include vice president for administration and finance at Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas, as well as roles there as dean of enrollment management and assistant dean of financial services. She holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and an MBA from American University and a doctorate in higher education administration from the University of Texas, Austin. She also is a graduate of the Harvard Institute for Higher Education and the HERS Institute for Women in Higher Education at Wellesley College.

Burleigh-Jones is also a very proud Diamond Life Member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., She was initiated at American University through the Nu Alpha Chapter in 1989 and has maintained continuous and active involvement with the sorority since that time.  Her involvement has included serving as the chapter treasurer through both her collegiate and alumnae chapters, serving as the Assistant Controller at the sorority’s National Headquarters (1992-1996) and serving as the collegiate advisor for the Alpha Kappa Chapter at Huston-Tillotson University (1999-2005). She recently played a key role in the reactivation of the Upsilon Delta Chapter at Dickinson College, ending the chapter’s five-year absence from campus (2013-2018). 

Diana B. Turk is director of teacher education and associate professor of social studies education at NYU – Steinhardt. As director of the Steinhardt Teacher Residency, she is passionate about preparing highly effective teachers for under-served settings who are able to reach and teach all students, including those with specialized language and learning needs. She believes that equity, inclusion, and passion belong in every classroom and that all students should have the opportunity to learn in settings that forefront inquiry, intellectual creativity, and joy.

Turk received her Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Maryland at College Park. She is co-author of Teaching Recent Global History (Routledge, 2014) and Teaching US History: Dialogues Between Teachers and Historians (Routledge, 2010), and author of Bound by a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women’s Fraternities, 1870-1920 (New York University Press, 2004). She has also written several articles and book chapters on innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to teaching history and social studies.

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley is an artist, curator, writer, and professor of American studies and African American studies at the University of Iowa. She received degrees in American studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz (BA), California State University, Fullerton (MA), and the University of Kansas (PhD). Her research and teaching fields include the institutional history, theories, and methods of American and cultural studies, 19th and 20th century American cultural history, comparative ethnic studies, Black cultural studies, the digital humanities, popular culture, and the visual arts.

Whaley has published original art, poetry, as well as articles on social movements, popular culture, sequential art, documentary photography, and film. She has been a resident visiting scholar at the Center for Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and was a recipient of a grant from the Monroe Trotter Institute for Black Culture for her research on responses to 9/11 in Black expressive art and in the public sphere.

Her recent book is Black Women in Sequence: Re-inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime (2015); it explores graphic novel production and comic book fandom, looking in particular at African, African American, and multiethnic women as deployed in television, film, animation, gaming, and print representations of comic book and graphic novel characters. Professor Whaley’s first book is: Disciplining Women: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black Counterpublics, and the Cultural Politics of Black Sororities (2010). In it, she examines the cultural practices, cultural work, and politics of the oldest historically Black sorority.

Her book in progress is titled Feeling Her Fragmented Mind: Women, Race, and Dissociative Identities in Popular Culture. It is an examination of dissociative identities (formerly known as multiple personality disorder) as a narrative trope in popular literature, film, television, and memoir, with a particular focus on Latinas, White, Asian/American, and Black women. More than an interpretive and critical analysis of popular cultural productions, Feeling Her Fragmented Mind engages with the intersection of différance, affect, and disability studies and combines the humanities and social sciences to explore the racial, class, and gender disparities in the medical industrial complex.

Whaley was co-curator, with Kembrew McLeod, of the University of Iowa Museum of Art exhibition, “Two Turntables and a Microphone: Hiphop Contexts Featuring Harry Allen’s Part of the Permanent Record; Photos From the Previous Century,” and she has served as a consultant or feature writer for exhibitions on Black popular music and Black sequential art. Whaley is on the editorial board of the journal American Studies, and formerly served on the editorial board for American Studies: Euroasian Perspectives and Lexington Press’ Africana Studies book series. She was the 2013-2014 chair of the Women’s Committee for the American Studies Association and now is serving as a committee member for the ASA’s committee on departments, programs, and centers.

 

 

Sarah McBride – EVENT POSTPONED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER

Activist

Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality

Thursday, November 15, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Sarah McBride is the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign and one of America’s leading public voices in the fight for LGBTQ equality. Her moving memoir, Tomorrow Will Be Different, chronicles her journey as a transgender woman, from coming out to her family and school community, to fighting for equality in her home state and nationally, to her heartbreaking romance with her late husband. A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Services, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the department of women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the Churchill Fund, and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Inclusivity. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Photo Credit: B Proud

Sarah McBride is a progressive activist and currently the national press secretary at the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization. In 2016, Sarah made history when she became the first openly transgender person to address a major party convention.

A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Sarah has been involved in politics and progressive advocacy for more than a decade. She co-founded a statewide high school young Democrats organization and worked for the campaigns of Governor Jack Markell (D-DE) and Attorney General Beau Biden (D-DE). During her sophomore year of college, Sarah was elected student body president at American University.

Sarah first made national headlines when, at the end of her term as student body president, she came out publicly as transgender in the student newspaper. She went on to intern in the Obama White House, the first openly trans woman to do so, and, after graduating from college, helped lead the successful effort to pass gender identity nondiscrimination protections in Delaware.

It was during her time at the White House that Sarah met Andrew Cray, a transgender man and fellow advocate. The two fell in love and began working together in the fight for LGBTQ equality. Andy was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2014, and just days after they married, he tragically passed away. Andy’s passing instilled in Sarah a firm belief in the urgency of political and social change.

Now as a spokesperson for the nation’s largest LGBTQ advocacy organization, Sarah has become one of America’s most public voices in the fight for LGBTQ equality, culminating in her address before the nation during the 2016 presidential election. Her moving memoir, Tomorrow Will Be Different chronicles her journey as a transgender woman, from coming out to her family and school community, to fighting for equality in her home state and nationally, to her heartbreaking romance with her late husband.

From Delaware to North Carolina to Texas, Sarah is working to resist the politics of hate and to move equality forward.

 

 

Jane Mt. Pleasant

Cornell University

The Paradox of Productivity: Lessons from an Indigenous Agriculture

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) agricultural systems in the 17th and 18th centuries were three to five times as productive as their European counterparts at the same time. This lecture provides insights into this ‘paradox of productivity.’

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and a Civic Learning and Engagement Initiative Grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of anthropology & archaeology, American studies, environmental studies, philosophy, history and the food studies program. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series and its semester theme, Indigeneity in the Americas.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Jane Mt. Pleasant, associate professor in the Horticulture Section of School of Integrative Plant Science at Cornell University, studies indigenous cropping systems and their productivity. Using her expertise in agricultural science, she examines agriculture from a multi-disciplinary perspective that includes history, archeology, paleobotany, and cultural/social anthropology. Although much of her work has focused on Haudenosaunee agriculture in the 16 through 18th centuries, more recently she has expanded her research to include pre-Columbian agriculture in eastern and central North America.

Mt. Pleasant received her B.S. and M.S. from Cornell University and her Ph.D. (in soil science) from North Carolina State University. She is of Tuscarora ancestry.

Daniel Ziblatt

Harvard University

How Democracies Die

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Is democracy in decline around the world? Is American democracy itself in trouble? Examining the history of democracy in the United States against a global backdrop of how democracies have died throughout history, Ziblatt comes to some surprising conclusions about the sources of vulnerability and strength in American democracy today. After Ziblatt’s presentation, Prof. David O’Connell will offer a brief scholarly counterargument that challenges certain aspects of Ziblatt’s book as they pertain to the American political system.  A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of political science and international studies, and the Churchill Fund. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Daniel Ziblatt is Eaton Professor of the Science of Government at Harvard University and a faculty associate at Harvard’s Minda De Gunzburg Center for European Studies. He researches and teaches in European politics, democratization, and historical political economy.

He is the author of three books, including two recent books, How Democracies Die (2018) (co-authored with Steven Levitsky), which was a 2018 New York Times Best seller as well as Conservative Parties and the Birth of Democracy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017), the winner of several prizes including the American Political Science Association’s 2018 Woodrow Wilson award and the American Sociological Association’s 2018 Barrington Moore Prize. His first book was Structuring the State: The Formation of Italy and Germany and the Puzzle of Federalism (Princeton University Press, 2006).  Recent scholarly articles have appeared in Journal of Economic HistoryAmerican Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, and World Politics.

Ziblatt is the director of a research program at Harvard University called Politics Through Time, which is a hub for social scientific research on the political history of democracy.  He has held fellowships in the United States and Europe, most recently as the Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute (Florence Italy), as well as fellowships at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study.  He has also been a DAAD Fellow in Berlin, an Alexander von Humboldt visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Cologne and the University of Konstanz, Germany, and visiting professor at Sciences Po Paris (2014) and Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (2009).  He serves on governing boards of several academic institutions and the editorial board of academic journals, including Comparative Political Studies, World Politics, and German Politics and Society.

oconneld OConnell DavidDavid O’Connell is an assistant professor of political science at Dickinson College. His major research interests include the presidency and the role of religion in American politics. O’Connell is the author of God Wills It: Presidents and the Political Use of Religion (Routledge, 2014), and his research and writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Politics and Religion, Political Science Quarterly, and White House Studies. O’Connell is also currently completing work on a series of articles examining how members of Congress use their Instagram accounts. A frequent media commentator on American politics, O’Connell has been interviewed by C-SPAN, Fox News, ABC 27, CBS 21, FOX 43, WGAL 8 and WITF, and he has been quoted by national print outlets ranging from CNN to The Christian Science Monitor to the Associated Press. O’Connell received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University, and holds a B.A. in political science and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors. O’Connell is the 2018 recipient of Dickinson’s Constance & Rose Ganoe Memorial Award for Inspirational Teaching.

Video of the Lecture

 

Dovie Thomason

Storyteller and Activist

Residency: Monday, October 29 – Friday, November 2, 2017

How the Wild West was Spun

Thursday, November 1, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Thomason’s story begins in 1887, eleven years after the battle of the Little Big Horn, when Buffalo Bill Cody brought his premiere of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West to Europe, cementing Cody as one of the most famous people of his day. His show, which he called The Drama of Civilization, attracted millions and affected perceptions of history to the present day.

This residency is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and a Civic Learning and Engagement Initiative Grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of English, anthropology & archaeology, sociology, history, American studies, and theatre & dance.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Dovie Thomason has been a storyteller and lecturer for over thirty years, sharing the importance of Indigenous narratives and arts to give voice to untold stories of Indigenous America. Her  ability to craft tales that not only enchant audiences––but also
raise provocative questions about Indigenous realities ––has long made her an inspiriting contributor to schools and organizations across the globe. The wry humor and subtle graces that infuse Thomason’s work enable her broad and modern appeal, while a lifetime of study and tradition bearing ensure the deep cultural roots of her craft remain intact. When she adds personal stories, the result is a contemporary voice, speaking with elegance , wit, passion and intention.

As an adult, Thomason never strayed far from the legacy her grandmother gave her. She  graduated college in 1970, obtaining a Bachelor of Arts in English and Theatre, with a concentration in Native Studies.  Following graduate study in secondary education, she began to teach high school students in Ohio, as well as work with urban Indian centers and Headstart programs which continue to this day. During her time in the classroom, she came to understand that stories were often the most effective way of reaching learners. This realization confirmed the importance of weaving her grandmother’s lessons into formal education, and increased her drive to understand more about her ancestral craft.

Thomason has been aided in her commitment to Indigenous oral traditions by tribal elders of many nations. The work and support of Vine Deloria (Dakota ) was a critical inspiration to her drawing from writings of his aunt, Ella Deloria , and Gertrude Bonnin, aka Zitka la -Ša (Nakota ). Making the commitment to share these stories publicly was particularly encouraged by the example and direct guidance of Alfonso Ortiz (Tewa ). From them, as well as many other seasoned tradition bearers, Thomason continues to hone her understanding of the ancient craft of storytelling. She was entrusted with new tales from neighboring cultures, different interpretations of familiar stories, and the tales of her  maternal Lakota ancestors. Learning to convey these stories to audiences young and old, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, became Thomason’s vocation.

In the three decades  following her decision to become a professional storyteller, Thomason’s dedication to sharing Indigenous voices has taken her down many roads. She has worked with countless schools and universities, acting as a guest or artist-in-residence for institutions from New  England to New Zealand. She has taught Native studies and regularly visits universities as a visiting lecturer or artist-in-residence, most recently with the Center for Creative Writing and Oral Culture at the University of Manitoba, which also hosts the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. She has presented keynotes, workshops, and consultations for noted organizations, including the National Headstart Conference, TEDx Leadership Conference, and NASA. Her storytelling has been featured on countless prominent stages, including the Kennedy Center, Smithsonian Museum, London’s Barbican, and Shakespeare ’s Globe Theater, working with artistic director Mark Rylance. Thomason has also found the time to work on a variety of special projects, lending her voice to narrations for the BBC, NPR, PBS, RTE, and the National Parks Service. She has also produced award-winning audio recordings of her own, receiving the Parent’s Choice Gold Star, the American Library Association’s Editor’s Choice Award, and the Audiofile Earphones. Other notable recognitions include the National Storytelling Network’s  ORACLE: Circle of Excellence Award, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers’ Traditional Storyteller Award, and acknowledgment as a master traditional /teaching artist by the National Endowment for the Arts, New England Foundation for the Arts, and Smithsonian Associates.

Thomason represented the U.S. as the featured  storyteller in Estonia : EU City of Culture  and Derry/Londonderry: UK City of Culture and Freedom Park in South Africa. She has been hosted multiple time s by The National Museum of the American Indian, as well as international storytelling festivals around the world. Thomason has used her storytelling  to advise the UCLA Film School on narrative in modern film, NASA on Indigenous views of technology, the Smithsonian Associates’ Scholars Program and the premier TEDx Leadership Conference. Her role as a traditional cultural artist has been honored by the National storytelling Network’s ORACLE: Circle of Excellence Award and the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers’ Traditional Storyteller Award.

Eboo Patel

Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC)

Out of Many Faiths: Religious Diversity and the American Promise

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

America is the most religiously devout country in the Western world and the most religiously diverse nation on the planet. Will America’s identity as a Judeo-Christian nation shift as citizens of different backgrounds grow in numbers and influence? In what ways will minority religious communities themselves change as they take root in American soil? In addressing these questions, Eboo Patel will explore how America’s promise is the guarantee of equal rights and dignity for all, and how that promise is the foundation of America’s unrivaled strength as a nation. A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by The Marjorie M. and Irwin Nat Pincus Fund in Honor of their Daughters, The Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life, the Division of Student Life, the Center for Service, Spirituality & Social Justice, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity, the Departments of Judaic Studies and Religion, the First Year Seminar Program and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Eboo Patel is a leading voice in the movement for interfaith cooperation and the founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), a national nonprofit working to make interfaith cooperation a social norm. He is the author of Acts of Faith, Sacred Ground and Interfaith Leadership. Named by U.S. News & World Report as one of America’s Best Leaders of 2009, Patel served on President Obama’s Inaugural Faith Council. He is a regular contributor to the public conversation around religion in America and a frequent speaker on the topic of religious pluralism. He holds a doctorate in the sociology of religion from Oxford University, where he studied on a Rhodes scholarship. For over fifteen years, Patel has worked with governments, social sector organizations, and college and university campuses to help realize a future where religion is a bridge of cooperation rather than a barrier of division.

Video of the Lecture

Congress to Campus

Monday, October 15, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Don Manzullo, (R-IL, 1993-2013) (Replacing Jim Kolbe, R-AZ)
Betsy Markey, (D-CO, 2009-2011)
David O’Connell (moderator), Dickinson College

Live Stream Link

A bipartisan pair of former members of Congress will look back on their own experiences in government and reflect on the challenges currently facing the United States of America. This discussion will be moderated by political scientist David O’Connell.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the department of political science, the Churchill Fund, and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Don Manzullo recently retired as president & CEO, KEI, Korea Economic Institute of America. During his  20  years  of  service  representing  the  16th District  of  Illinois,   Manzullo was  a  leading  voice  in  shaping  congressional  economic  and  foreign  policy towards  the  Asia Pacific region.  He  started  his  career in the  House  of  Representatives  in  1993  on  the  Subcommittee  on  Asia  and  the  Pacific  of  the  House  Foreign  Affairs  Committee  and  ended  his  tenure in Congress serving as the Republican leader of this pivotal subcommittee from 2007 until 2013,  including  chairing  the  Asia  subcommittee  during  his last  two  years in the  House. Manzullo also  served  as  a  member  of  the  Foreign  Affairs  Subcommittee  on  International Economic Policy and Trade.

Manzullo was appointed by House Speaker John Boehner to serve a commissioner on the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, which monitors compliance with human rights obligations and the development of the rule of law in the People’s Republic of China.  He was appointed by a previous speaker to serve as a member of the House Task Force on the Hong Kong Transition.

Manzullo is well-known as a staunch advocate for small business, manufacturing, and trade between the United States and Asian economies.  For 14 years, Manzullo served on the Small Business Committee, first chairing the Exports Subcommittee from 1995 to 2001.  He was then elected by his fellow colleagues to chair the full Small Business Committee – one of just 17 standing committees of the U.S.  House  of  Representatives  – for  a maximum  of  three 2-  year  terms  from  2001  to  2007.

Manzullo  also  served  on the  House  Financial  Services  Committee  for  16  years,  sitting  on  three  important  subcommittees  dealing  with  the  U.S. economic recovery,  capital  markets,  banks,  financial  reforms, and international monetary policy.  He co-founded and co-chaired the bipartisan House Manufacturing Caucus and also served as a co-chair of the House Automotive Caucus.

During the course of his career in Congress,Manzullo authored 17 bills that  were  signed  into  law  by  the  president  and  altered  the  direction  of  18  other  bills  that  also  became  law.    He  also significantly  influenced  over  50  administrative  actions  by  the  Executive  Branch  through  regulatory  changes  or  alterations  to  internal  policy.   Overall,  Manzullo chaired  over 140  hearings   on   diverse   subjects   ranging   from   global   competitiveness   and   manufacturing  to  human  rights.    He  supported  every  free  trade  agreement  (FTA)  in  Congress,  and served on several “whip” teams to encourage his fellow legislators to vote for these market opening initiatives.  Manzullo has been recognized for his leadership on various legislative issues, including receiving the Distinguished Service Award from the Small Business Exporters Association for his work that improved various trade promotion programs, the Leadership Award from the Coalition for Employment through Exports for his legislation that reauthorized the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the prestigious Wings of Liberty Award from the Aerospace Industries Association for his efforts to amend an export control regulation that freed up billions of dollars of commercial aviation parts and components to be sold abroad without requiring a license for each item.

Manzullo was also appointed by the Speaker of the House to serve as chairman of the Canada-U.S. Inter-parliamentary Group and the U.S.-China Inter-parliamentary Exchange. He also was a frequent participant in the U.S.-European Union Inter-parliamentary Exchange; the U.S.-Mexico Inter-parliamentary Exchange; and the U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange program, developing relationships with legislators from all around the world. Manzullo also led two of the largest official Congressional delegations to visit dignitaries in China, Australia, and New Zealand. Manzullo was one of the first critics of easy lending practices for residential real estate, which created and then led to the collapse of the subprime mortgage market that quickly spread to other financial markets both in the United States and around the world. In 2000, he was an early co-sponsor of the Housing Finance Regulatory Improvement Act, which would have reduced the systemic risk posed to capital markets by financial institutions that engaged in lax mortgage lending practices. Manzullo has spoken before numerous groups on financial services and trade issues. He also gained a reputation for being one of the most knowledgeable U.S. legislators on manufacturing, leading him to be a featured speaker before numerous manufacturing organizations such as the National Association of Manufacturers, the Precision Metalforming Association, and the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering (SAMPE). Mr. Manzullo has also visited hundreds of manufacturing facilities in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He also authored numerous op-eds and letters to the editor that appeared in local and national publications, including the Rockford Register Star, the Northwest Herald, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Times. Prior to his congressional service, Manzullo practiced law as an attorney in Oregon, Illinois before entering politics. He holds a Juris Doctor from Marquette University (1970) and a B.A. from American University (1967), and honorary Juris Doctor from Inha University, Inchon, Korea.

Betsy Markey has over 35 years of experience as a member of Congress, a senior federal government executive, the co-founder and CFO of a high tech company and a small retail store.

In January 2015, Markey was appointed by President Obama to serve as the regional administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration based in Denver. In this capacity she oversaw the delivery of the agency’s small business programs and services in Colorado, Montana, North and South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.  As an appointee she was required to resign her position in January 2017.

In 2011, Markey was appointed to serve as the assistant secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Washington DC. She facilitated the direct line of communication between the department and governors and mayors across the country on all DHS mission areas, including cyber security, terrorism prevention, transportation security, immigration enforcement, border security, human trafficking and disaster assistance.

Markey was elected to serve as a member of Congress in Colorado’s 4th Congressional District in 2008, and represented over 700,000 constituents in one of the country’s largest congressional districts in the 111th Congress. She served on the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on Agriculture. Prior to being elected to Congress, she was the regional director in northern Colorado for U.S. Senator Ken Salazar.  She worked closely with local elected officials, businesses, agricultural groups and non-profit groups.

In the late-1980’s, Markey and her husband launched a successful technology company, Syscom Services, which was one of the first companies to market email, and subsequently expanded into the area of web design and web-based information management systems. The firm has been ranked in the Inc. 500 listing of America’s fastest-growing private companies. She participated in the sale of the company to a group of investors.

In the mid-1990’s, she purchased a coffee/ice cream shop in Fort Collins called Huckleberry‘s. After making extensive changes, she sold the business four years later for double the purchase price.

Markey worked for the U.S. Department of State from 1984-1988 as the director of Computer Security Policy and Training, where she traveled extensively to our overseas Embassies and consulates conducting computer security threat and vulnerability analyses. She entered the federal government as a Presidential Management Fellow in 1983, where she held positions as budget and program analyst in the Department of the Treasury and the U.S. Customs Service.

She has also served as president of the board of directors for the Larimer County Food Bank, chair of its Capital Campaign, and a member of the Local Legislative Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Florida and a master’s of public administration from American University.

oconneld OConnell DavidDavid O’Connell is an assistant professor of political science at Dickinson College. His major research interests include the presidency and the role of religion in American politics. O’Connell is the author of God Wills It: Presidents and the Political Use of Religion (Routledge, 2014), and his research and writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Politics and Religion, Political Science Quarterly, and White House Studies. O’Connell is also currently completing work on a series of articles examining how members of Congress use their Instagram accounts. A frequent media commentator on American politics, O’Connell has been interviewed by C-SPAN, Fox News, ABC 27, CBS 21, FOX 43, WGAL 8 and WITF, and he has been quoted by national print outlets ranging from CNN to The Christian Science Monitor to the Associated Press. O’Connell received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University, and holds a B.A. in political science and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors. O’Connell is the 2018 recipient of Dickinson’s Constance & Rose Ganoe Memorial Award for Inspirational Teaching.

Video of the Discussion

Sustainable Endowment?

Thursday, October 11, 2018
Weiss Center for the Arts, Rubendall Recital Hall, 3 p.m. 

Panelists

Alice Handy, Investure
Sarah Kolansky, Graham Partners
Rob Symington, Dickinson Board of Trustees

What is the purpose of Dickinson’s endowment? How is it managed? Should Dickinson join a growing movement to invest our endowment in ways that align with community values regarding corporate behavior, social justice, environmental stewardship, climate change and other issues? What might be the implications for the performance of our endowment and the financial wellbeing of the college? Is it possible to have a sustainable endowment? Join us for a discussion about these issues.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the President’s Office, Dickinson Sustainable Investment Group, Board of Trustees, Office of Finance & Administration, and Center for Sustainability Education.

Biographies (provided by the speakers)

Alice Handy founded Investure in December 2003. Prior to founding Investure, Alice spent 29 years managing the endowment of the University of Virginia. She started as the first investment officer, later became treasurer, and finally president of the University of Virginia Investment Management Company.  Alice began her career as a bond portfolio manager and assistant vice president at the Travelers Insurance Company. She also served as state treasurer for the Commonwealth of Virginia from October 1988 to January 1990.

Alice earned her B.A. cum laude from Connecticut College and took graduate courses in economics at the University of Virginia.  Alice is an active member of the governing council for the Miller Center of the University of Virginia and serves on the boards of Bessemer Securities Corporation and MSCI, Inc. Additionally, she serves on the board of the American Friends of the National Gallery, London, Inc. Alice also serves on the Investment Committees of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Charlottesville Area Community Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institute.

Sarah Kolansky joined Graham Partners in 2017 to support the firm’s work on sustainability opportunities and issues, as well as environmental, social and governance (ESG) matters, across its investment portfolio and internally within Graham Partners. Kolansky works with portfolio companies on various sustainability initiatives, including monitoring resource usage, increasing operational efficiency through energy auditing, and evaluating sustainable alternatives to traditional manufacturing processes.

Prior to joining Graham Partners, Kolansky was an associate in Climate Change and Sustainability with ICF, where she worked with local and federal government agencies, as well as with external clients, on various ESG initiatives.

Kolansky received her B.S. in civil and environmental engineering from Bucknell University, where she graduated cum laude, and is pursuing her master of environmental studies from the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, she passed both the LEED Green Associate exam and the Fundamentals of Engineering exam. She has completed and is credited with five industry publications.

Rob Symington is currently a senior advisor to the Avenue Capital Group as well as a senior lecturer of finance at the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. Symington was previously the senior portfolio manager for the U.S. Funds at Avenue Capital Group having joined Avenue in 2005. Prior to joining Avenue he was the chief investment officer of the Resurgence Funds at M.D. Sass Investment Services.

Symington has a B.A. in English literature from Dickinson and a M.B.A. from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University (’92). In addition to being a member of the board of trustees at Dickinson, Symington is a member of the Advisory Council for Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. He also serves on three private company boards: NextWave Wireless Inc., All-American Poker Network and CycloPure Inc.

Jacqueline Patterson

 NAACP

Environmental Racism in the Age of Climate Change

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Environmental racism proliferates throughout the climate change continuum from who is most likely to be exposed to the co-pollutants from facilities that spew the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, to who is most likely to be displaced or even killed from climate change induced disasters. The depth of the systemic inequities require a transformative response to ensure that civil, human, and earth rights are upheld. A book sale and signing will follow the program.

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, the Churchill Fund, the departments of American studies, sociology, Africana studies, the program in policy studies, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM), and the Center for Sustainability Education. This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.  

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Jacqueline Patterson is the director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program. Since 2007 Patterson has served as coordinator & co-founder of Women of Color United. Patterson has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate and activist working on women’s rights, violence against women, HIV&AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, emergency response, and environmental and climate justice. Patterson served as a senior women’s rights policy analyst for ActionAid, assistant vice-president of HIV/AIDS Programs for IMA World Health, outreach project associate for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, research coordinator for Johns Hopkins University, and as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Jamaica, West Indies.

Patterson’s publications/articles include: “Equity in Resilience Building for Climate Adaptation: An Indicators Document” “Jobs vs. Health: An Unnecessary Dilemma,” “Climate Change is a Civil Rights Issue,” “Gulf Oil Drilling Disaster: Gendered Layers of Impact,” “Disasters, Climate Change Uproot Women of Color,” “And the People Shall Lead: Centralizing Frontline Community Leadership in the Movement Towards a Sustainable Planet,” and book chapter, “Equity in Disasters: Civil and Human Rights Challenges in the Context of Emergency Events” in the book Building Community Resilience Post-Disaster.

Patterson holds a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland and a master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University. She currently serves on the steering committee for Interfaith Moral Action on Climate, advisory board for Center for Earth Ethics as well as on the boards of directors for the Institute of the Black World, Center for Story Based Strategy, GRID Alternatives, Center for Sustainable Climate Solutions,  and the National Black Workers Center.

Video of the Lecture

 

Bob Weick

Actor and Monologist, Featured as Karl Marx

Marx in Soho by Howard Zinn

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

In Howard Zinn’s one-person play, Karl Marx, the revolutionary socialist, comes back to earth to clear his name. Performed by Bob Weick, Marx in Soho, is a freewheeling and entertaining show, and Weick delivers an impassioned performance that connects Marx to contemporary themes.

The presentation is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of history, sociology, economics, American studies and the First Year Seminar program.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Bob Weick is the celebrated national touring actor of Howard Zinn’s Marx in Soho. A veteran stage actor in Philadelphia, he is a two-time Barrymore nominee with Iron Age Theatre (TERRA NOVA) and Theatre Horizon (CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION). Weick’s friendship and working relationship with the late Howard Zinn began in 2004 with the critically acclaimed sold out Philadelphia premiere of Marx in Soho. Weick has gone on to perform the piece over 300 times across the country from Maine to California.

Weick is a company member of Iron Age Theatre, where he collaborates with artistic director John Doyle as theatre activist and educator.

Weick also serves the equine community as a farrier. Earlier this year, he presenting hoof care clinics in hurricane ravaged Vieques, while also performing the play for the beleaguered Island community.

Related Links
Interview with Bob Weick

Video of Performance for Campus-Viewing Only

Angela Belcher – “Joseph Priestley Award Recipient”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Joseph Priestley Award Celebration Lecture

Giving New Life to Materials for Energy, the Environment and Medicine

Thursday, September 27, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

This talk will address the possibilities Engineering Biology provides for working with a larger toolkit of materials to tailor properties in devices for energy, environmental remediation, and cancer diagnostics and treatment.

The Joseph Priestley Award recipient is chosen by a different science department each year. The Department of Chemistry has selected this year’s recipient. The event is supported by the College’s Priestley Fund and is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of biology, chemistry, earth sciences, environmental studies, mathematics & computer science, psychology, and physics & astronomy and the Churchill Fund.  It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography

Angela Belcher is a biological and materials engineer with expertise in the fields of biomaterials, biomolecular materials, organic-inorganic interfaces and solid-state chemistry and devices. Her primary research focus is evolving new materials for energy, electronics, the environment, and medicine.

She received her B.S. in creative studies from The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). She earned a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry at UCSB. Following with her postdoctoral research in electrical engineering at UCSB. She now holds the James Mason Crafts Professor of Biological Engineering and Materials Engineering at MIT. She is faculty in the Department of Biological Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering and the Koch Institute of Integrative Cancer Research. She teaches undergraduate subjects in material sciences and engineering and biological engineering. In 2002, she founded the company Cambrios Technologies, Inc., and in 2007 she founded Siluria Technologies, Inc.

Some recent awards include the 2013 $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize for her inventions, 2010 Eni Prize for Renewable and Non-conventional Energy, in 2009 Rolling Stone Magazine listed her as one of the top 100 people changing the country. In 2007, Time magazine named her a “Hero”- for her research related to Climate Change. In 2004, she received the Four Star General Recognition Award (US Army) for significant contribution to army transformation. In 2000, she was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE). She was named Research Leader of the Year by Scientific American, and is a MacArthur Fellow, a Packard Fellow, a NAI (National Academy of Inventors) Fellow, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, a NAE (National Acedemy of Engineers) Fellow, and a member of American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Related Links

NOVA series “Making Stuff.”
NOVA series “Making More Stuff.” (Starting at ~43 minute mark)
Better Batteries through Biology
Lawrence Hall of Science – Who Works on Nanotechnology?
AACR Annual Meeting 2017

Joseph Priestley Lecture
The Joseph Priestley Award is presented by Dickinson College in memory of Joseph Priestley, discoverer of oxygen, to a distinguished scientist whose work has contributed to the welfare of humanity. The award, first presented in 1952, recognizes outstanding achievement and contribution to our understanding of science and the world.

Video of the Lecture

Neal Katyal

Georgetown Law

Talk is Trump and the Rule of Law

Wednesday, September 26, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Neal Katyal, former acting solicitor general of the United States, will be discussing the Supreme Court, President Trump, the Mueller investigation, and the rule of law in a wide ranging discussion.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State’s Dickinson Law and co-sponsored by the Departments of Political Science and History.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Neal Katyal is the Paul and Patricia Saunders Professor of Law at Georgetown University and a partner at Hogan Lovells. He previously served as acting solicitor general of the United States. He has argued 37 cases before the Supreme Court of the United States, with 35 of them in the last 9 years. Most recently, Neal argued the “Travel ban” case on behalf of the State of Hawaii against President Trump in the Supreme Court of the United States. In the 2016-17 term alone, Neal argued 7 cases in 6 separate arguments at the Supreme Court, far more than any other advocate in the nation – nearly 10% of the docket. At the age of 48, he has already argued more Supreme Court cases in U.S. history than has any minority attorney, recently breaking the record held by Thurgood Marshall. His numerous distinctions include: the Edmund Randolph Award (the highest civilian award given by U.S. Department of Justice), The Litigator of the Year by American Lawyer (2017, chosen as the sole Grand Prize Winner of all the lawyers in the United States), Appellate MVP by Law360 numerous times (most recently in 2017), winner of Financial Times Innovative Lawyer Award in two different categories (both private and public law) (2017), one of GQ’s Men of the Year (2017), 40 Most Influential Lawyers of the Last Decade Nationwide by National Law Journal (2010), and 90 Greatest Washington Lawyers Over the Last 30 Years by Legal Times (2008). He has appeared on virtually every major American news program, as well as on Stephen Colbert and House of Cards on Netflix (where he played himself).

Video of the Lecture

The Fugitive Slave Law and the Crisis Over Immigration Policy: Assessing a Forgotten Legacy

 Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address

Monday, September 17, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Panelists:

Richard Blackett, Vanderbilt University
Andrew Delbanco, Columbia University
Judy Giesberg, Villanova University
Matthew Pinsker (moderator), Dickinson College

The controversial 1850 Fugitive Slave Law provoked a bitter national debate over open borders, due process, family separation, federal power and northern states’ rights. Our panelists will discuss those earlier controversies and assess how they might offer important insights or perspective for the current and increasingly intense debates over Trump Administration immigration policies. A book sale and signing will follow.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the House Divided Project and co-sponsored by the Departments of History and American Studies and the Program in Policy Studies.

Biographies (provided by the speakers)

Richard Blackett is Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author, most recently, of The Captive’s Quest for Freedom: Fugitive Slaves, the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law and the Politics of Freedom (2018) and Making Freedom: The Underground Railroad and the Politics of Freedom (2013). He teaches courses on 19th century U.S. history and the history of the Caribbean. During the academic year, 2013-14, he was Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford University.

Andrew Delbanco is the Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1985. He earned his A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. On July 1, 2018, he became president of the Teagle Foundation, which supports liberal education for students of all backgrounds.

Photo Credit: Zachary Peckler

Delbanco is the author of several books, including most recently College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be (Princeton University Press, 2012), which has been translated into several languages.  Melville: His World and Work (Knopf, 2005) was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography, and was awarded the Lionel Trilling Award by Columbia University. His essays appear regularly in The New York Review of Books and other journals, on topics ranging from American literary and religious history to contemporary issues in higher education.

Delbanco has been a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2001. That same year he was named “America’s Best Social Critic” by Time Magazine.  In 2006 he was honored with the Great Teacher Award by the Society of Columbia Graduates, and in 2013 he was elected to the American Philosophical Society. He holds honorary degrees from Ursinus College, Occidental College, and Marlboro College. In 2012, he was awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama.

Delbanco’s new book, The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War will be published by Penguin in the fall.

Judith Giesberg is professor of history at Villanova University. Giesberg is the author of five books, Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women’s Politics in Transition (Boston, MA:  Northeastern University Press, 2000),“Army at Home:” Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (Chapel Hill, NC:  University of North Carolina Press, 2009), Keystone State in Crisis:  Pennsylvania in the Civil War (Pennsylvania Historical Association, 2013), and Emilie Davis’s Civil War:  The Diaries of a Free Black Woman in Philadelphia, 1863-1865 (State College, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2014.)  Giesberg’s latest book, Sex and the Civil War, began as a short paper on Anthony Comstock presented to the Civil War Caucus several years ago, where fellow caucusers offered terrific advice and leant their enthusiasm to an attempt to explore pornography and the sexual culture of the U.S. Army camps during the Civil War. Giesberg is editor of the Journal of the Civil War Era.

Currently, Giesberg is directing a digital project, Last Seen:  Finding Family After Slavery, that is collecting, digitizing, and transcribing information wanted ads taken out by former slaves looking for family members lost to the domestic slave trade.  Her new project is a study of the administration of the 1870 census.

Photo Credit: Ryan Burke

Matthew Pinsker is a professor of history and holds the Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College.  He also serves as director of the House Divided Project at Dickinson College, an innovative effort to build digital resources on the Civil War era. Pinsker has previously held fellowships at the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College, National Constitution Center and New America Foundation. Pinsker graduated from Harvard College and received a doctoral degree in modern history from the University of Oxford. He is the author of two books:  Abraham Lincoln –a volume in the American Presidents Reference Series from Congressional Quarterly Press (2002) and Lincoln’s Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers’ Home (Oxford University Press, 2003).  Pinsker’s next book is forthcoming from W.W. Norton & Co., entitled, Boss Lincoln: The Partisan Life of Abraham Lincoln.  Pinsker has helped train over 5,000 K-12 history educators and frequently leads teacher-training workshops for organizations such as the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. He currently serves the Organization of American Historians (OAH) as a “Distinguished Lecturer.” Finally, Pinsker sits on the advisory boards of several historic organizations, including Ford’s Theatre Society, Gettysburg Foundation, National Civil War Museum, and President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home.

Teaching Materials

Teachers and students who want to prepare for this discussion might want to begin by consulting Giesberg’s recent op-ed for the Washington Post entitled, “Jeff Sessions is Wrong.  Sanctuary-city advocates aren’t like secessionists. They’re like abolitionists.”  Another good starting point for understanding this historic parallel comes from law professor Jeffrey Schmitt who has written law review articles on this subject.  But Schmitt also has a helpful blog post that describes why Blackett’s new book on the fugitive crisis (Captive’s Quest) is such an important addition to our understanding of how the resistance to the fugitive law evolved.  Drawing historical lessons for the “resistance” was also a topic that noted historian Eric Foner explored in a recent op-ed for The Nation.  Delbanco’s new and much-anticipated book on the fugitive slave law is not quite available for sale yet (War Before the War, November 2018), but audience members can preview some of his views on President Trump’s historical legacy in this roundtable from the New York Review of Books which came out at the very end of the 2016 election.  Finally, for those seeking more in-depth treatments of these subjects and the historic parallels and connections between the fugitive slave crisis of the 1850s and the immigration crisis of our era, see freely available scholarly articles by  Kraehenbuehl (2011), McKanders (2012), and Schmitt (2013), or shorter but context-filled recent magazine pieces in Time or Slate.

Finally, what makes this topic so especially relevant here in Carlisle is something the panelists will also address.  In particular, they will describe Dickinson College’s complicated and surprisingly deep connections to the fugitive issue.  In 1847, for example, the college and the Carlisle community were nearly ripped apart by a violent fugitive slave episode, involving Professor John McClintock and a network of black antislavery figures in town. It is also true that the most notorious fugitive slave commissioner of the 1850s, a man named Richard McAllister, was a graduate of the college (Class of 1840).

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address
The annual address is endowed through the generosity of Winfield C. Cook, former Dickinson Trustee. Each year the Clarke Forum invites a prominent public figure to campus to speak on a contemporary issue related to the Constitution. The event celebrates the signing of the United States Constitution and commemorates Dickinson’s connection to that document, through John Dickinson’s participation as an original signer. Previous speakers have included Kenneth Starr, Ira Glasser, Lowell Weicker, Marjorie Rendell, Tom Ridge, Michael Chertoff and Kimberlé Crenshaw.

Video of the Discussion

Dan Longboat – Roronhiakewen (He Clears the Sky)

Trent University

Honoring Indigeneity: Indigenous Knowledge(s) and Indigenous Sovereignty

Wednesday, September 12, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

For millennia Indigenous Nations have cared for and actively engaged with the landscape and through our respective cultures and unique ways of life have worked to create the bio-diverse richness of the Americas. Today, the Americas are confronted by a complexity of issues and problems that Indigenous Knowledge(s) can help to address. But we’ll need to start from the beginning, opening our minds to learning, understanding and honoring the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of anthropology & archaeology, American studies, psychology, environmental studies, and earth sciences. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series and its semester theme, Indigeneity in the Americas.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Dan Longboat – Roronhiakewen (He Clears the Sky) is a Turtle Clan member of the Mohawk Nation and a citizen of the Rotinonshón:ni (Haudenosaunee – People of the Longhouse), originally from Ohsweken – the Six Nations community on the Grand River. Longboat is an associate professor in the Chanie Wenjack School for Indigenous Studies at Trent University, founding director of the Indigenous Environmental Science/Studies program (IESS) and acting director of the newly formed Indigenous Environmental Institute (IEI). He was also the first director of studies of Trent’s Indigenous Studies Ph.D. program. Longboat designed and developed the IESS program – the first of its kind on Turtle Island. Granting both B.A. and B.Sc. degrees since 2009, the IESS program is an innovative and multidisciplinary undergraduate program that brings together principles of both Indigenous and Western (or neo-European/colonial) Knowledge systems for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners. It is based on a collaborative partnership between university departments. Unique IESS courses, along with courses in Indigenous Studies and Environmental Resource Studies and Sciences, form the curriculum.

Longboat is celebrated for his Traditional Rotinonshón:ni Knowledge and embeds this into his teaching and in developing the IESS program ongoing. Dan also acts as a cultural advisor and instructor for several programs at the First Nations Technical Institute, Ryerson University and several Ontario universities and colleges. Longboat is invited to share across Turtle Island and lectures and teaches on diverse topics including Indigenous environmental knowledges and philosophy, Indigenous responses to environmental issues, interactive science and Indigenous Knowledge systems, Indigenous education, pedagogy and Indigenous ways of knowing as founded upon Indigenous languages and cultures, the recognition and resurgence of Traditional Indigenous lifeways and practices, human health and the environment, traditional Indigenous foods and medicines, natural resource development and restoration, community sustainability, international Indigenous networks, the recognition of treaty and Indigenous rights and understandings of the environmental and human impacts of colonialism. Longboat stresses the importance of learning from Indigenous elders and knowledge holders as the critical foundation for Indigenous identity, vision and life purpose. He creates links between traditional Indigenous teachings and science and promotes using a “Good Mind” as part of our responsibilities in taking the collective actions needed to restore the earth for the next seven generations.

Longboat and Professor Chris Furgal created the TRent Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge and Science Initiative (TRACKS), in 2011, alongside IESS faculty. TRACKS is a youth education and outreach program that offers classroom and after-school workshops, outreach programming and summer camp experiences for children with a focus on weaving Indigenous knowledges with math and science curriculum. Oshkwazin is a new TRACKS program, which works to develop Indigenous Youth Leadership and Advocacy. In 2018, the Indigenous Environmental Institute (IEI) is a non-profit dedicated to public education, professional development and training, and community-based research.

Longboat has a B.A. from Trent University in Native Studies with a special interest in Human Psychology. Dan completed his M.E.S and Ph.D. in Environmental Studies at York University where his dissertation, The Haudenosaunee Archipelago: The Nature and Necessity of Bio-Cultural Restoration and Revitalization won the Faculty of Graduate Studies prize in 2009.

Related Links

Selected Publications
Kulnieks, A., Longboat, D.R., & Young, K. (Eds.). (2013). Contemporary studies in environmental and Indigenous pedagogies: A curricula of stories and place. Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers.
Selected Videos 2017 – Indigenous Studies/Dan Longboat (3.29) This features Dan and has information on IESS courses.
2017 – Dan Longboat: A Way of Life: Indigenous Knowledge to Sustain the World (1.22.04) Dan shares teachings at Dalhousie University’s College of Sustainability in Halifax, NS with an introduction by Mi’kmaw Elder Albert Marshall.
2016 – Sustainability and Indigenous Understandings – Trent Talks (16.13) Dan expounds on Indigenous frameworks for making daily changes in the face of the current environmental issues we face.
2015 – Trent University: Centre for Teaching and Learning – Dan Longboat (4.52) Dan shares understandings of Indigenous Knowledge and pedagogies, Traditional teachings and the benefits of bringing Indigenous Knowledge systems into the academy.

Video of the Lecture

A snapshot of our upcoming programs is listed below. Check back in mid-January or the full programming schedule for spring 2019

Monday, February 4, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.
The Bruce R. Andrews Lecture
Topic: Political Propaganda and Belief in Misinformation and Conspiracy Theories
Joanne Miller, University of Minnesota

Tuesday, February 5, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.
The Morgan Lecture
Understanding the Impact of Modern Day Segregation
Nikole Hannah-Jones, award-winning investigative reporter

Tuesday, February 19. 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.
Blackness in the Dominican Americas
Dixa Ramierz, Brown University

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

An Evening with Writer Linda Hogan
Linda Hogan, poet and novelist

Thursday, April 18, 2019
The Cubiculo, 7 p.m.
Jack & Jill
Mark Blashford, Lanky Yankee Puppet Co.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Rick Smolan ’72

New York Times Best-Selling Author and National Geographic Photographer

The Good Fight: America’s Ongoing Struggle for Justice

Friday, April 27,  2018
Althouse Hall, Room 106, 4:30 p.m.

Smolan will share images and stories from his new book The Good Fight. The book captures the sporadically violent, often triumphant, always risky struggles of Americans who have experienced hatred, oppression or bigotry because of their gender, skin color, country of origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability or beliefs over the past 100 years. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Rick Smolan, CEO of Against All Odds Productions is a New York Times best-selling author   with more than five million copies of his books in print.  A former Time, Life, and National Geographic photographer, Smolan is best known as the co-creator of the “Day in the Life” book series.  His global photography projects, which feature the work of hundreds of the worlds leading photographers and combine creative storytelling with state-of-the-art technology, are regularly featured on the covers of prestigious publications around the globe including Fortune, Time, and GEO. His latest book, The Good Fight:  American’s Ongoing Struggle for Justice, is a powerful reminder of how much progress America has made over the past 100 years against hatred, bigotry, racism, misogyny, homophobia and injustice and what’s at risk right now. Smolan has spoken at TED, The Davos World Economic Forum, The Ford Foundation, The Wired Health Conference, TEDMED, Techonomy, DLD in Munich, IdeaCity in Canada, INK in India. His TED talk “Natasha’s Story: An American Homecoming” has been watched by more than a million people.  American 24/7, a New York Times bestseller, enabled thousands of Americans to create a national family album during one ordinary week, and was featured as one of Oprah Winfrey’s “Favorite Things.” In the fall of 2012 Smolan released The Human Face of Big Data focusing on humanity’s new ability to collect, analyze, triangulate and visualize vast amounts of data in real time. The project, sponsored by EMC, Cisco and SAP resulted in a large format book, an iPad app which won a 2013 WEBBY award, and an award-winning PBS TV special. The book was delivered to 10,000 key influencers in 50 countries courtesy of FedEx.  In 2014 the Oscar Winning Producers of The Kings Speech released TRACKS based on Smolan National Geographic cover story about 27-year-old Robyn Davidson’s 1,700 mile nine-month solo camel trek across the treacherous Australian Outback. In the movie Robyn Davidson was portrayed by Mia Wasikowska (Stoker, The Kids are Alright, Alice in Wonderland). Smolan was portrayed by Adam Driver, (Kylo Ren in Star Wars).  Fortune magazine describes Smolan’s company, Against All Odds as “One of the 25 Coolest Companies in America.”

Related Links

  • The Good Fight became one of Amazons top 100 books within a week after it was released and it just sold out of its second printing
  • It was recently featured in New York Times
  • CBS did this terrific segment
  • TED just sent copies to all 1,500 members as the official TED BOOKCLUB selection
  • People Magazine chose it as one of the 10 best gift books of the year
  • The book comes with a free THE GOOD FIGHT VIEWER app that enables readers to point their phones at any one of 63 photographs to immediately stream short compelling videos that expand each story

Video of the Lecture

Stephen Walt

Harvard University

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars Program

Where is U.S. Foreign Policy Headed?

Thursday, April 26, 2018  (Rescheduled from March 22, 2018)
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Watch Live Stream

This lecture explores the future of U.S. foreign policy under President Trump. Walt argues that Trump, his bellicose tweets notwithstanding,  is gradually being captured, coopted, and constrained by the foreign policy establishment. Under Trump, therefore, U.S. foreign policy is likely to be an even more inept version of our recent follies.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Phi Beta Kappa and co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Advising, Political Science and International Studies.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Stephen Walt is Belfer Professor of International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a former academic dean. He also taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago and has been a resident associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution. He is a contributing editor at Foreign Policy, co-chair of the editorial board of International Security, and co-editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs book series. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received the International Studies Association’s Distinguished Senior Scholar award in 2014. His books include The Origins of Alliances; Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy; and The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy. He is currently writing a book about why U.S. foreign policy keeps failing.

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars Program

Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Visiting Scholar Program has been offering  undergraduates the opportunity to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the intellectual life of the institution by making possible an exchange of ideas between the Visiting Scholars and the resident faculty and students.

The Visiting Scholars travel to more than 100 colleges and universities each year, spending two days on each campus and taking full part in the academic life of the institution. They meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the academic community and the general public.

Over the last 60 years, 648 Visiting Scholars have made 5,288 visits to Phi Beta Kappa sheltering institutions.

Founded in 1776, the Phi Beta Kappa Society is the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society. Its mission is to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences, to recognize academic excellence, and to foster freedom of thought and expression.

Video of the Lecture

Dale Bredesen

UCLA and Buck Institute

Reducing the Global Burden of Dementia: The First Alzheimer’s Survivors

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Watch Live Stream

Bredesen describes his treatment for Alzheimer’s and pre-Alzheimer’s, along with associated challenges and implications. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Office of Senior Associate Provost; the Career Center; Pre-Health Society; Pre-Health Program; Division of Student Life;  the Wellness Center; Department of Biology; and the Program in Policy Studies. It was initiated by the Clarke Forum Student Project Managers.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Dale E. Bredesen, M.D. received his undergraduate degree from Caltech and his medical degree from Duke.  He served as resident and chief resident in neurology at UCSF, then was postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Nobel laureate Prof. Stanley Prusiner.  He was a faculty member at UCLA from 1989-1994, then was recruited by the Burnham Institute to direct the Program on Aging.  In 1998 he became the founding president and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, and Adjunct Professor at UCSF; then in 2013 he returned to UCLA as the director of the Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research.

The Bredesen Laboratory studies basic mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative process, and the translation of this knowledge into effective therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, leading to the publication of over 220 research papers. He established the ADDN (Alzheimer’s Drug Development Network) with Dr. Varghese John in 2008, leading to the identification of new classes of therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease.  His group has developed a new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and this approach has led to the discovery of subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease, followed by the first description of reversal of symptoms in patients with MCI and early Alzheimer’s disease, with the ReCODE (reversal of cognitive decline) protocol, published in 2014 and 2016.  His book, The End of Alzheimer’s, is a New York Times Bestseller.

Related Links
CBN: New Alzheimer’s Treatment, Prevention Shows Impressive Results

First Paper 2014: Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program

2016 Paper: Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease

Subtypes: Metabolic profiling distinguishes three subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease

Silicon Valley Health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D5aA_-3Ip8

Video of the Lecture

 

Aloys Mahwa

 Living Peace Institute  – Promundo

Masculine Identity and Sexual Gender Based Violence: The Case of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

Thursday, April 19, 2018
Althouse Hall, Room 106
Noon – 1 p.m. (Light lunch will be provided)
RSVP strongly encouraged, but not required to clarkeforum@dickinson.edu.

Sexual gender-based violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been described as the worst in the world.  Mahwa will discuss ProMundo and Living Peace Institute preventative approaches that engage men, working to eradicate the root causes of violence.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Aloys Mahwa is Promundo’s Living Peace project director in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Using group therapy and group education techniques, the Living Peace initiative addresses the trauma associated with conflict and promotes equitable, nonviolent paths to healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Mahwa manages the scale-up of Living Peace in the North and South Kivu provinces of eastern DRC, playing a key role in coordinating stakeholder working sessions, developing the Living Peace Institute, documenting and building upon the program’s lessons learned and best practices, and supervising monitoring and evaluation of the initiative. Mahwa joined Promundo after five years of experience working with USAID to support Rwandan health financing initiatives.

Mahwa has a master’s degree in project management and anthropology and a master’s degree in managerial economy from the Catholic University of Central Africa. He earned his  bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Jesuit Faculties of Paris.

Reece Jones

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Violent Borders: The State vs. the Right to Move

Monday, April 16, 2018
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Over 40,000 people died trying to cross a border in the past decade around the world. Jones argues these deaths are part of a long history of states using movement restrictions to protect privileges and to contain the poor. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program, the Departments of Sociology and International Studies and the Security Studies Certificate Program. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Citizen/Refugee.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Reece Jones is professor of geography at the University of Hawaii and the author two books: Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move (Verso 2016) and Border Walls: Security and the War on Terror in the United States, India, and Israel (Zed Books 2012), four edited books, and over two dozen journal articles. His work has been published in the Guardian, the New York Times, and dozens of other media outlets around the world. He is currently working on a book about racial profiling by the US Border Patrol.

Video of the Lecture