Past Programs

Alexander Heffner – “Constitution Day Address Lecturer”

Journalist, Writer and Civic Educator

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address

Civil Discourse in an Uncivil Age

Monday, September 18, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

WATCH LIVE

Heffner will discuss the millennial citizen, the space of old and new media, and the character of contemporary political discourse. How can we restore faith in democracy?

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State’s Dickinson Law and co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Division of Student Life and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Alexander Heffner is the host of The Open Mind on PBS. He has covered American politics, civic life and Millennials since the 2008 presidential campaign. His work has been profiled in The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Los Angeles Times, Variety, Medium, and on NBC News, MSNBC, C-SPAN, CNN, BBC and NY1, among other media outlets. His essays, reviews and op-eds have appeared in TIME, Reuters, RealClearPolitics, NYT’s Room for Debate, The Wall Street Journal and The Boston Globe, among other publications. He has lectured, participated in and moderated panels at the Newseum, National Constitution Center, FDR Library and Museum, Center for Information and Bubble Studies, Institute of Applied Politics, Center for Telecommunication and Law, Brian Lamb School of Communication, Graduate School of Political Management, University of San Diego, University of Notre Dame, University of New Mexico, University of South Florida, Simpson College and Skidmore College, among other institutions of learning. He was the political director for WHRB 95.3 FM and host of The Political Arena.  A native New Yorker, he is a graduate of Andover and Harvard.

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address
The annual address is endowed through the generosity of Winfield C. Cook, former Dickinson Trustee. Each year the Clarke Forum invites a prominent public figure to campus to speak on a contemporary issue related to the Constitution. The event celebrates the signing of the United States Constitution and commemorates Dickinson’s connection to that document, through John Dickinson’s participation as an original signer. Previous speakers have included Kenneth Starr, Ira Glasser, Lowell Weicker, Marjorie Rendell, Tom Ridge, Michael Chertoff and Kimberlé Crenshaw.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz – “Morgan Lecturer”

American historian, writer and feminist

Morgan Lecture

The Genocidal Foundation of the United States

Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Dunbar-Ortiz will provide a history of settler colonialism and genocidal war that she argues forms the foundation of the United States. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is  also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma.  As a veteran of the Sixties revolution, she has been involved in movements against the Vietnam War and imperialism, union organizing, and was one of the founders of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960s. Since 1973, she has worked with Indigenous communities for sovereignty and land rights and helped build the international Indigenous movement. With a doctorate in History, she professor emerita at California State University East Bay, and author of numerous scholarly Indigenous related books and articles, including Roots of Resistance:  A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico and The Great Sioux Nation, as well as a memoir trilogy and the award-winning book, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Her book, Unloaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment, will be published in January, and a book challenging the concept of the United States as “a nation of immigrants” will appear in 2019.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison, Patricia Hill Collins, Winona LaDuke and Lila Abu-Lughod.

Video of the Lecture

Breaking Issue: North Korea Today

Thursday, September 7, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Jina Kim, Dickinson College
Richard Lacquement,  U.S. Army War College
Jeff McCausland, Dickinson College
Douglas Stuart (moderator), Dickinson College

Link to Live Stream

This panel of experts will share their ideas regarding the current North Korean political situation, including such perspectives as the relationship between North Korea and South Korea, tactics to control the nuclear threat, and U.S. policy.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Political Science, International Studies and East Asian Studies.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Jina E. Kim is visiting assistant professor of East Asian Studies with a focus on modern Korean history, literature, and media. Her research and teaching areas include Korea under Japanese colonial rule, transnational Asian studies, Korean diaspora, and Korean War, all of which pay close attention to the history of North Korea and North Korean relations with its East Asian neighbors. Her writings on these topics have appeared in Journal of Korean Studies, Review of Korean Studies, and Harvard Asia Quarterly, among others.

Richard A. Lacquement Jr. is the dean of the School of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. As dean he oversees senior-level military education programs for more than 1200 rising national security professionals annually. The most considerable programs he leads are the one-year resident education program and the two-year distance education program that both award graduates a Masters of Strategic Studies degree in addition to Army and joint professional military education credentials. Lacquement is a political scientist with a doctorate in international relations specializing in security studies. During more than 29 years of active service in the U.S. Army, he was a strategist and field artillery officer, to include combat experience in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Before his military retirement in 2013, he had many senior level assignments, to include with NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) Joint Command in Afghanistan, as chief of plans for U.S. Forces Korea, and in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy.  He had tactical assignments in U.S. Army Airborne, Air Assault and Armored units and teaching assignments at the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Naval War College.  He is the author of the book Shaping American Military Capabilities after the Cold War and several articles and book chapters on national security, the Army, civil-military relations, post-war drawdowns, stability operations and counterinsurgency. He holds a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy, master’s degrees from the Naval War College and Army War College, and M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University.

Jeff McCausland is the founder and CEO of Diamond6 Leadership and Strategy, LLC.  He is a visiting professor of International Security Affairs at Dickinson College and former dean of academics at the U.S. Army War College as well as distinguished visiting professor of research and Minerva chairholder.  McCausland is a retired U.S. Army Colonel, holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and a West Point graduate.  His military assignments included: the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans, Army Staff; command of an artillery battalion during the Gulf War; dean of the Army War College; and director for Defense Policy and Arms Control, National Security Council Staff, the White House.  Since retiring from the military he has served as a chaired professor of Leadership at the U.S. Naval Academy and subsequently a visiting professor at the Penn State Graduate School of International Affairs prior to joining the Dickinson faculty.

McCausland is a national security consultant for CBS radio and television.  He has provided extensive analysis of American national security policy and the crisis in Korea for over fourteen years.  He is also a senior fellow at both the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership at the Naval Academy.  He has published and lectured broadly both in the United States and over twenty-five foreign countries on national security affairs, NATO, the wars in Afghanistan/Iraq, security in Asia, civil-military relations, and leadership development.

Douglas Stuart (moderator) is the first holder of the Stuart Chair in International Studies at Dickinson College.  He is also an adjunct research professor at the U.S. Army War College.  His research tends to focus on two topics: the history of, and proposals for reform of, the U.S. national security bureaucracy and U.S. foreign and security policies in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.  His writings on Asian security have appeared in several journals, including Asian Affairs, the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, and the Korean Journal of Defense Analysis.

Video of the Lecture

 

H. Andrew Schwartz

Stony Brook University

The Power of Big Social Media Data

Wednesday, September 6, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Schwartz will focus on what large-scale social media data can reveal about the users generating it and how this is changing social science.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science and the Department of American Studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Big Data.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

H. Andrew Schwartz is an assistant professor of computer science at Stony Brook University (SUNY), where he runs the HLAB: Human Language Analysis Beings, and teaches courses in data science. His interdisciplinary research focuses on large and scalable language analyses for health and social sciences. Utilizing natural language processing and machine learning techniques he seeks to discover new behavioral and psychological factors of health and well-being as manifest through language in social media. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Central Florida in 2011 with research on acquiring lexical semantic knowledge from the Web, and he was previously a visiting assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania and lead research scientist for the World Well-Being Project, a multi-disciplinary team of computer, health, and social scientists seeking to measure and advance our understanding of human well-being using big data. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Wired, and The Washington Post.

Related Links

Personality, Gender, and Age in the Language of Social Media: The Open-Vocabulary Approach

Yelp Reviews Of Hospital Care Can Supplement And Inform Traditional Surveys Of The Patient Experience Of Care

Transparency and Trust — Online Patient Reviews of Physicians

Twitter Can Predict Rates of Coronary Heart Disease, According to Penn Research

Video of the Lecture

Lance Freeman

Columbia University

The End of the Ghetto? Gentrification in Black Neighborhoods 1980-2015

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

In the first decades of the 21st century gentrification has accelerated in black neighborhoods across a number of cities. This talk examines the prevalence of this trend, some possible causes and the implications for the Black Ghetto.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Black Student Union, the Departments of Political Science, Economics, and Sociology and the Program in Policy Studies. This is a Clarke Forum student project manager initiated  event.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Lance Freeman is a professor in the Urban Planning Program at Columbia University in New York City. His research focuses on affordable housing, gentrification, ethnic and racial stratification in housing markets, and the relationship between the built environment and well being. Freeman teaches courses on community development, housing policy and research methods.  He has also taught in the School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Delaware.  Prior to this, Freeman worked as a researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, a leading social policy research firm in Washington D.C.  Freeman holds a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Freeman has published several articles in refereed journals on issues related to neighborhood change, urban poverty, housing policy, urban sprawl, the relationship between the built environment and public health and residential segregation.  He is also the author of the book There Goes the Hood: Views of Gentrification from the Ground Up (Temple University Press). Freeman also obtained extensive experience working with community development groups while working as a community development coordinator for the North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development and as a research associate at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  Freeman also has professional experience working as a city planner for the New York City Housing Authority, and as a budget analyst for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

Video of the Lecture

Kelly Brownell – “Joseph Priestley Award Recipient”

Duke University

Joseph Priestley Award Celebration Lecture

Harnessing Academic Work to Make a Difference: Food Policy as an Example

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

With the goal of more tightly connecting work in academic settings with the real world of social and policy change, a model of strategic scholarship will be described. Examples will be drawn from work on food policy (e.g., menu labeling, food marketing, soda taxes).

The Joseph Priestley Award recipient is chosen by a different science department each year.  The Department of Psychology has selected this year’s recipient, Kelly Brownell. The event is supported by the College’s Priestley Fund and is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of biology, chemistry, earth sciences, environmental studies, math & computer science, psychology, and physics & astronomy.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Kelly Brownell is dean of the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, where he is also Robert L. Flowers Professor of Public Policy and professor of psychology and neuroscience.

In 2006 Time magazine listed Kelly Brownell among “The World’s 100 Most Influential People” in its special Time 100 issue featuring those “.. whose power, talent or moral example is transforming the world.” Brownell was elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) in 2006 and has received numerous awards and honors for his work, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association and the Graduate Mentoring Award from Yale University.

Prior to joining the faculty at Duke, Brownell was at Yale University where he was the James Rowland Angell Professor of Psychology, professor of epidemiology and public health, and director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. While at Yale he served as chair of the Department of Psychology and as Master of Silliman College.

Dr. Brownell has published 15 books and more than 350 scientific articles and chapters. He has served as president of several national organizations and has advised the White House, members of congress, governors, world health and nutrition organizations, and media leaders on issues of nutrition, obesity, and public policy.  He was cited as a “moral entrepreneur” with special influence on public discourse in a history of the obesity field and was cited by Time magazine as a leading “warrior” in the area of nutrition and public policy.

Joseph Priestley Lecture
The Priestley Award is presented by Dickinson College in memory of Joseph Priestley, discoverer of oxygen, to a distinguished scientist whose work has contributed to the welfare of humanity. The Priestley Award, first presented in 1952, recognizes outstanding achievement and contribution to our understanding of science and the world.

Video of the Lecture

Winona LaDuke – “Morgan Lecturer”

Executive Director, Honor the Earth

Morgan Lecture

The Next Energy Economy: Grassroots Strategies to Mitigate Global Climate Change & How We Move Ahead

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 
(Rescheduled from Fall 2016)
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Native American writer and activist Winona LaDuke will draw from her grassroots experiences, including the #NoDAPL movement at Standing Rock, to explore how we can move forward to create a new energy economy. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Center for Sustainability Education, the Churchill Fund and the Departments of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Environmental Studies, American Studies, Anthropology & Archaeology and Political Science.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s  Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series and part of the Clarke Forum’s Fall 2016 semester theme, Food.

laduke_winona5-10(300)Biography (provided by the speaker)

Winona LaDuke is an internationally renowned activist working on issues of sustainable development renewable energy and food systems. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and is a two-time vice presidential candidate with Ralph Nader for the Green Party.

As executive director of the Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on the issues of climate change, renewable energy, and environmental justice with indigenous communities. And in her own community, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation based nonprofit organizations in the country, and a leader in the issues of culturally based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy, and food systems. In this work, she also continues national and international work to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering.

In 2007, LaDuke was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, recognizing her leadership and community commitment. In 1994, she was nominated by Time magazine as one of America’s 50 most promising leaders under 40. She has been awarded the Thomas Merton Award in 1996, Ms. Woman of the Year (with the Indigo Girls) in 1997, and the Reebok Human Rights Award, with which in part she began the White Earth Land Recovery Project. The White Earth Land Recovery Project has won many awards, including the prestigious 2003 International Slow Food Award for Biodiversity, recognizing the organization’s work to protect wild rice from patenting and genetic engineering.

A graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities, she has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. She is a former board member of Greenpeace USA and is presently an advisory board member for the Trust for Public Lands Native Lands Program as well as a board member of the Christensen Fund. The author of five books, including Recovering the Sacred, All Our Relations, and a novel, Last Standing Woman, she is widely recognized for her work on environmental and human rights issues.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison and Patricia Hill Collins.

Video of Event for Campus Viewing Only

Bees and Beekeeping Today

Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Olivia Bernauer, graduate student, University of Maryland
Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban, beekeeper and professor, Rhode Island College
Rodney Morgan, beekeeper
Samuel Ramsey, doctoral student, University of Maryland
Marcus Welker, (moderator), projects coordinator, Center for Sustainability Education, Dickinson College

This panel explores the significance of bees and beekeeping from a variety of perspectives, including the recent entomological research, the growth of beekeeping, and the work we are doing here at Dickinson.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Center for Sustainability Education, the Department of Biology and the Food Studies Certificate Program.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Olivia Bernauer is currently a second-year Masters student at the University of Maryland, College Park working in the vanEngelsdorp bee lab. Her ongoing research combines citizen science with a specimen collection to determine the most valuable pollinator plants for the native pollinators in the state of Maryland. Previously, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, she worked to understand the response of bumble bee colonies to fungicide both in the field and in a controlled cage experiment.

Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban is a professor emerita of anthropology at Rhode Island College and is a faculty member of the doctoral program in education. She is also adjunct professor of African studies at the Naval War College, Newport. At Rhode Island College she taught courses on race, gender, African, Middle East and Islamic studies and received both the awards for Distinguished Teaching and Distinguished Scholarship.

Besides her academic history, she has been a beekeeper since 2003 as well as a beekeeping educator giving annual lectures for the Urban Agriculture program at Brown University. She was the main inspiration behind the installation of beehives for public education on the urban campus of Rhode Island College in Providence in 2010 where the RI Beekeepers’ Association Bee Schools are held each year in February and March. She also initiated a Bee Education Center on campus which offers educational tours of the beehives for school children from around the state on the environmental importance of bees.

Her academic experiences include living and conducting research in the Sudan, Egypt and Tunisia. Her research subjects cover: Islamic law and Islamic society, women’s status in Muslim societies, race, ethics and anthropological research, human rights and cultural relativism, and comparative studies in law and society. She is the author of several books including Islamic Law and Society in the Sudan, Ethics and the Profession of Anthropology: Dialogue for Ethically Conscious Practice, and most recently a textbook Ethics and Anthropology, Ideas and Practice.

Rodney Morgan has been a beekeeper for the last 10 years.  He currently manages 35-50 hives throughout the year, with several of the hives located at Dickinson College Farm.  Rodney works as an electronics technician, but also owns and runs Whistleberry Farm in Boiling Springs, along with his wife, Lynne.  They grow a variety of produce in addition to beekeeping and are regular vendors at the Farmers on the Square Market in Carlisle and the Dillsburg Farmers Market.

Samuel Ramsey‘s enduring interest in entomology started 19 years ago and shows no signs of waning. A Ph.D. student studying in Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp’s lab at the University of Maryland, College Park; Ramsey tries to maintain a focus on how insect research can benefit the public through development of IPM strategies and STEM outreach initiatives. Ramsey studied entomology at Cornell University as an undergraduate focusing on predatory/parasitic insect behavior. His current work focuses on the effects of honey bee parasites on individual and colony level survivorship specifically targeting Varroa destructor.

Marcus Welker came to Dickinson in fall 2015 after completing his master of science in ecology and evolutionary biology degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. At Dartmouth, Marcus studied Atlantic salmon migration and traveled to Alaska, Greenland, and Svalbard to learn more about the effects of climate change on the Arctic. While not studying, Marcus learned to keep honeybees, ride and maintain bicycles, and brew beer. Marcus enjoys sharing his passions for the outdoors, the environment, and sustainability with the Dickinson community and is excited to mentor students, staff, faculty, and alumni in the art and science of beekeeping.

Video of the Panel Discussion

Lila Abu-Lughod – “Morgan Lecturer”

Professor, Columbia University

Morgan Lecture

Muslim Women and the Freedom to Choose

Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

What can we learn from public debates about Muslim women that hinge on a right – the “right to choose freely”- that has been enshrined in international feminist conventions and that animates the popular American imagination about such practices as veiling and arranged marriage?  Anthropologist Abu-Lughod will examine the everyday lives of young women in one Egyptian village to open up new ways of thinking about choice and to expose the politics of common fantasies about this right. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Morgan Lecture Fund and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science at Columbia University where she teaches anthropology and women’s studies.  A leading voice in the debates about culture, gender, Islam, and global feminist politics, her books and articles have been translated into 14 languages. Her scholarship, mostly ethnographic and based on long term fieldwork in Egypt, has focused on the relationship between cultural forms and power; the politics of knowledge and representation; and the question of human and women’s rights in the Middle East and globally. Her award-winning books include Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society (whose 30th anniversary edition with a new Afterword was published in September 2016);  Writing Women’s Worlds: Bedouin Stories (1993); and Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt (2005). Her most recent book,  Do Muslim Women Need Saving? was published by Harvard University Press in 2013. A founding member of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University, she has also published on memory, and violence, having co-edited a book called Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory (2007). She has just begun work this year on a collaborative project funded by the Henry Luce Foundation on “Religion and the Global Framing of Gender Violence.”

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison and Patricia Hill Collins.

Video of the Lecture

Sonya Renee Taylor

Author/Poet

These events are part of “Love Your Body Week

Your Body is Not an Apology

Thursday, February 23, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

This performance by author/poet Sonya Renee Taylor uses popular education, performance poetry and media examples to introduce participants to the concepts of body terrorism and radical self-love.

Workshop: 10 Tools for Radical Self Love

Friday, February 24, 2017
(Open only to Dickinson community. RSVP to clarkeforum@dickinson.edu  – Space is limited)
TIME & LOCATION CHANGE: Noon – 1:30 p.m. in Althouse 106

Can you re-imagine a relationship with your body and your life that is not adversarial? In this two-hour workshop get practical tools and a step by step action plan that can dramatically shift your relationship with your body from enemy to gorgeous partner in creating your most unapologetic life of radical self-love!

These events are sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Churchill Fund, the Division of Student Life, the Women’s and Gender Resource Center, the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Ethnicity, the Office of LGBTQ Services, and the Departments of Sociology, Psychology and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Sonya Renee Taylor is the founder and radical executive officer of The Body is Not An Apology (TBINAA), an international movement, digital media and education company committed to radical self-love and body empowerment as the foundational tool for social justice and global transformation. TBINAA reaches over 250,000 people weekly in 140 countries with their content and educational projects. Taylor’s work as an award-winning performance poet, activist, speaker, and transformational leader continues to have global reach. She has appeared across the U.S., New Zealand, Australia, England, Scotland, Sweden, Germany, Canada and the Netherlands. Sonya and her work has been seen, heard and read on HBO, BET, MTV, TV One, NPR, PBS, CNN, Oxygen Network, The New York Times, New York Magazine, MSNBC.com, Today.com, Huffington Post, Vogue Australia, Shape.com, Ms. Magazine and many more. She has shared stages with such luminaries as Carrie Mae Weems, Theaster Gates, Harry Belafonte, Dr. Cornell West, Hilary Rodham Clinton, the late Amiri Baraka and numerous others. Sonya continues to perform, speak and facilitate workshops globally.  Visit her at www.sonya-renee.com or  www.thebodyisnotanapology.com.

Video of the Presentation

Yoga for Every Body

Tuesday, February 21, 2017
HUB, Dance Studio, Noon – 1 p.m.

Our spectacular, local yoga instructor Michele Landis, owner of Simply Well Yoga, will conduct a yoga class for everyone–all levels, all bodies, all ages.  Mats are provided or bring your own!

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and is part of Love Your Body Week.

Biography of Michele Landis

Michele Landis is the owner of Yoga at Simply Well. Michele teaches yoga and works as a one-on-one holistic health coach in Carlisle, PA. She graduated with honors from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York, NY. The Institute for Integrative Nutrition is the only nutrition school integrating all of the different dietary theories, combining the knowledge of traditional philosophies with modern concepts such as the USDA food guidelines, the glycemic index, the Zone and raw foods. Michele’s passion is helping her clients cook more and buy and eat local, seasonal foods. She earned her teacher certification in Kripalu Yoga from the Karma Yoga Lifestyle Program of the renowned Kripalu Institute in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. At the Kripalu Institute, where she studied and served on staff for almost two years, Michele learned the value of incorporating work as a spiritual practice through daily workshops, yogic breathing, nutrition, and connection to nature and community. Michele’s own connection to nature is reflected in her passion for backpacking. She has hiked the entire Appalachian Trail, from Georgia to Maine, and has taught day-hiking classes at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, where she first began practicing yoga. Michele has also hiked the Colorado Trail and New England’s Long Trail. She holds an associate degree from the Harrisburg Area Community College.

 

Lester Spence

Johns Hopkins University

Trump, Race, and the Slow Death of Democracy

Thursday, February 16, 2017
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m. (New Location)

Spence will talk about the causes and the potentially stark consequences of Donald Trump’s election. While some point solely to racial politics, Spence examines the role of the neoliberal turn.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Ethnicity, the Division of Student Life, and the Departments of American Studies, Political Science, Sociology, and the Program in Policy Studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series. This event was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s student project managers.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Lester Spence is an associate professor of political science and Africana studies at Johns Hopkins University and the Center for Emerging Media Scholar in Residence. Spence  specializes in the study of black, racial, and urban politics. Over the past decade Spence published articles on American institutional legitimacy in the wake of the contentious 2000 Presidential election, the effects of long-term black political empowerment on black participation, the role of media narratives on black attitudes about HIV/AIDS, and the determinants of support for black nationalism. But with his first and second books (2011 W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award Winner Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics and Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics) he’s become particularly interested in studying the causes and consequences of growing inequality within black communities.

In the classroom Spence strives to accomplish three goals: To infuse a love of learning and the life of the mind; to clarify the role politics plays in the world; and finally, to increase the capacity to change it. In 2009 he received an Excellence in Teaching Award from Johns Hopkins University. In 2010 he received an Arts Innovation Grant to fund a course that combined Black Politics and Documentary Photography. In 2016 as a Center of Social Concern Engaged Scholar Spence taught two “deep dive” courses designed to get students to understand the political circumstances leading up to the Baltimore Uprising.

Video of the Lecture

Community Responses to Anti-Muslim Hatred

Monday, February 13, 2017
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Joyce Davis (moderator), founder and president, World Affairs Council
Samia Malik, director of education, Council on American-Islamic Relations Harrisburg chapter
Ikram Rabbani ’17, student, Dickinson College
Ann M. Van Dyke, Community Responders Network

Since 2015, attacks on Muslims have spiked in the United States, including Central Pennsylvania. This evening’s panel will discuss community responses designed to combat anti-Muslim hatred by promoting pluralism and interfaith dialogue.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program.

Biographies
Joyce M. Davis is director of communications for the City of Harrisburg and supervisor of WHBG Channel 20, the region’s government and public affairs television station.  She also is founder and president of The World Affairs Council of Harrisburg. A former foreign correspondent and foreign editor for National Public Radio and Knight Ridder Newspapers, Davis is author of many articles, broadcasts and two books: Between Jihad and Salaam: Profiles in Islam and Martyrs: Innocence, Vengeance and Despair in the Middle East. Davis is a member of several boards, including the World Affairs Councils of America, United Way of the Capital Region, Elizabethtown College, Penn State School of Humanities Advisory Board and State Street Academy of Music. Davis has received numerous awards, including the U.S. State Department’s Distinguished Service and an honorary doctorate from Kyrgyz International University for her work in advancing a free and independent press in the former Soviet Union, and for securing the free flow of information to Kyrgyzstan during the downfall of its dictatorial regime in the “Tulip Revolution” of 2005.

Samia Malik is from Chennai, India, where she attended St. Ursula’s Catholic high school and Stella Maris University. As a student, Malik was active in varsity track and field, basketball, and volleyball as well as debate and literature clubs. A member of several interfaith organizations, Malik serves as director of education for the Council on American-Islamic Relations Harrisburg chapter, co-chair for the Community Responders Network, and board member of the Pennsylvania Immigrant and Refugee Women’s Network. Malik is a task force member of the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission and board member of the South Central Pennsylvania chapter of the ACLU. She volunteers at an interfaith shelter for the homeless, a shelter for battered women and children, and the Central Pennsylvania food bank. A spokesperson for several area mosques, Malik is a frequent speaker at colleges, schools, churches, and synagogues. For her work in interfaith relations she has received awards from The World Affairs Council of Harrisburg and Market Square Presbyterian Church.

Ikram Rabbani was born and raised in Flushing, NY, a predominantly Muslim Pakistani-American community,  and is currently studying 20th century American History, Secondary Education, and Philosophy at Dickinson. Rabbani devoted his career at Dickinson to prepare himself to teach high school history in an inner city public school. He conducted research in South Africa regarding race and education in Apartheid and Post-Apartheid South Africa, while also comparing those to pre- and post 1954 education in the United States.  More recently, Rabbani studied in Israel and Palestine, focusing primarily on the conflict and attempts at conflict resolution. At Dickinson he works at the College Farm, Media Center, and is the president of the Muslim Students Association.

Ann M. Van Dyke is a former civil rights investigator and trainer for the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission serving for 33 years. For more than twenty years, she worked with communities and schools affected by hate crimes and organized hate groups. She conducted training sessions on civil rights law, state and federal hate crimes laws, and civil tension for municipalities, schools, employers, and religious and civic groups. Van Dyke often partnered with the Pennsylvania State Police, the Office of Attorney General, and Pennsylvania and US Departments of Education, and the US Department of Justice. Since retirement, Van Dyke has been active in the Community Responders Network, which works to prevent and respond to bias incidents; Heeding God’s Call to End Gun Violence, an interfaith group that focuses on the trafficking, purchase and use of illegal hand guns; the Criminal Justice and Community Relations Task Force working to improve police-community relations in Harrisburg; and the Common Ground Community Center on Allison Hill, Harrisburg.

Video of the Discussion