Media

Elizabeth Hinton

Hinton Poster FinalHarvard University

Federal Policy, Urban Policing, and the Roots of Mass Incarceration

Thursday, November 19, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Shedding light on the devastating outcomes and the deep racial disparities within American law enforcement and penal institutions, Hinton traces the development of the War on Crime from its origins in the War on Poverty through the rise of mass incarceration and the War on Drugs in the 1980s. Hinton’s historical account situates the punitive policies of Ronald Reagan not as a sharp policy departure but rather as the full realization of the shift towards surveillance and confinement implemented by previous administrations.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of American studies, history, philosophy and sociology. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

ehintonimageElizabeth Hinton is assistant professor in the Department History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Hinton’s research focuses on the transformation of domestic social programs and urban inequality in the 20th century United States. She is the author of a forthcoming history of the War on Crime (with Harvard University Press), as well as articles and op-eds in the Journal of American History, the Journal of Urban History, and Time.

Video of the Lecture

Tibetan Cultural Pageant

Cultural Pageant PosterA Program that is Part of the Tibetan Monk Residency,
Enlightened Activity: The Green Tara Initiative

Wednesday, November 18, 2015
Weiss Center for the Arts, Rubendall Recital Hall, 7 p.m.

Tibetan Monks, Drepung Monastery’s Gomang College

This program is a colorful display of traditional Tibetan arts. The monks will perform a variety of dances—the yak dance, snow lion dance, “good luck” dance—wearing special costumes. They also chant in the distinctive way that they use for pujas and will demonstrate their vigorous style of monastic debating.

This residency is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by a Center for Sustainability Education Grant, the Departments of East Asian Studies and Religion,  Center for Service, Spirituality, and Social Justice,  Waidner-Spahr Library, Division of Student Life and the Luce grant for Asian studies and the environment.

Tibetan Monks Facebook Page

Video of the Lecture:

Inviting Green Tara: An Illustrated Talk and Tibetan Buddhist Ritual

Monks Tara PosterA Program that is Part of the Tibetan Monk Residency,
Enlightened Activity: The Green Tara Initiative

Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Dan Cozort, Dickinson College
Tibetan Monks, Drepung Monastery’s Gomang College

Mandala making is part of a distinctive religious practice called tantra or vajrayana. The practitioner of the Tara tantra chants a liturgy that describes Tara and the cosmos, symbolized by the mandala, but in three dimensions. As he chants, he visualizes the three dimensional mandala and visualizes Tara within it; then he suddenly becomes Tara and visualizes doing feats of vast generosity and healing. The chanting is done in an unusual and distinctive manner; the monks employ a tone so low that it generates overtones, so that each monk is singing a chord. They also use bells, drums, and sometimes a kind of oboe. Before the puja begins, Prof. Cozort will give a short illustrated talk about Tara, the mandala, and the puja, making the connection between what the monks are doing and Buddhist insights into greed, delusion, and ill-will as the roots of environmental degradation and consumerism.

This residency is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by a Center for Sustainability Education Grant, the Departments of East Asian Studies and Religion,  Center for Service, Spirituality, and Social Justice,  Waidner-Spahr Library, Division of Student Life and the Luce grant for Asian studies and the environment.

 Biographies (provided by the speakers)

headshot Oct 11Dan Cozort is associate professor in the Department of Religion at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he teaches comparative religion, specializing in the religions of India, Tibet and Native America. A native of North Dakota, he earned degrees from Brown University and the University of Virginia. He has written two books on Buddhist tantra, a catalogue for an exhibition on tantric art, a video documentary on sand mandalas, a book on the schools of Indian Buddhism, another specifically on the Prasangika Madhyamika School, and several articles and book chapters on topics such as anger, suffering, Western Buddhist teachers, Buddhist ethics, and Tibetan Buddhism in America. He is the editor of the Journal of Buddhist Ethics and the Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics. Before coming to Dickinson, he taught at the University of Virginia, James Madison University, and Bates College. He was one of the founders of the South India Term Abroad (SITA) study program, a collaborative effort of several small liberal arts colleges, and served as its director in Madurai, south India. In 2003‑2005 he directed Dickinson’s program in humanities at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England.

Tibetan Monks

Tibetan Monks Facebook Page

Video of the Presentation

Enlightened Activity: The Green Tara Initiative

Monks Poster 1Tibetan Monk Residency

Tuesday, November 17 – Saturday, November 21, 2015

Monks from Drepung Monastery’s Gomang College, originally near Lhasa, Tibet, and now re-established in south India, will come to Dickinson to present “A Tibetan Buddhist Approach to Thinking About Our Place in the Cosmos.” Over the course of four days, the monks will construct a mandala (symbol of the cosmos) out of colored sand; perform a puja (a ritual involving chanting and visualization of the symbolized cosmos); perform a cultural program with traditional Tibetan dances, chanting, and debating; and visit classes.

This residency is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by a Center for Sustainability Education Grant, the Departments of East Asian Studies and Religion,  Center for Service, Spirituality, and Social Justice,  Waidner-Spahr Library, Division of Student Life and the Luce grant for Asian studies and the environment.

Video of Opening Ceremony for the Green Tara Mandala Construction

Time Lapse Video of Mandala Construction

Sacred Art Tour Central PA Facebook Page

Green Tara Mandala Construction 
Waidner-Spahr Library

The Green Tara Mandala is a beautiful creation in colored sand. The monks will draw an outline on the mandala platform and then begin to fill it in, working from the center outwards. They use pairs of special funnels that will emit a thin stream of sand when one is rubbed against the other, and sometimes use blocks to make sharp edges or ridges that will give the mandala a more three-dimensional appearance. Over four days, what will emerge is a symbol of the entire cosmos with the Buddha of Enlightened Activity, Tara (in her green form), at its center. Onlookers will be able to watch the monks and converse with them around the mandala platform in the circulation area of the library; they can also gain an “aerial” view from the library’s upper-floor walkway.

Opening Ceremony:  Wednesday, November 18: 10 a.m.
Wednesday, November 18: 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 19: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Friday, November 20: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 21: 9 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Closing Ceremony: Saturday, November 21, 2015: 11 a.m.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

7 p.m.:  Inviting Green Tara: An Illustrated Talk and Tibetan Buddhist Ritual
          
       Stern Center Great Room
                      Dan Cozort, Dickinson College
                      Tibetan Monks, Drepung Monastery’s Gomang College

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

10 a.m.:  Opening Ceremony for Green Tara Mandala Construction
Waidner-Spahr Library

11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.:  Green Tara Mandala Construction
Waidner-Spahr Library

7 p.m.: Tibetan Cultural Pageant
                Weiss Center, Rubendall Recital Hall, 7 p.m.
Tibetan Monks, Drepung Monastery’s Gomang College

Thursday, November 19, 2015

9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.:  Green Tara Mandala Construction
Waidner-Spahr Library

Friday, November 20, 2015

9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.:  Green Tara Mandala Construction
Waidner-Spahr Library

Saturday, November 21, 2015

9 a.m. – 11 a.m.: Green Tara Mandala Construction
Waidner-Spahr Library

11 a.m.: Closing Ceremony
Waidner-Spahr Library

Sand mandalas are temporary creations. The monks will perform a ceremony to de-consecrate the mandala; they will then sweep it into a pile and distribute the sand to any who would like to take some home.

Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte

Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte PosterVanderbilt University

Obama Is Brazilian: (Re)Signifying Race Relations in Contemporary Brazil

Thursday, November 12, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Barack Obama’s election to the American presidency in 2009 sparked a renewed interest in the theme of race in the Americas, and worldwide. The sight of an African American as President of the United States led analysts to declare that North America was living in a post-racial era. But Obama’s election also had a tremendous impact on the imaginary of the African Diaspora.  This lecture will examine his characterizations in the Brazilian media, especially in examples of political humor, such as cartoons and memes.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by Latin American, Latino and Caribbean studies, Portuguese and Brazilian studies and the department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Oliveira-Monte professional pictureBiography (provided by the speaker)
Professor Oliveira-Monte’s research interests include Afro-Brazilian literature, race relations, race in comparative perspective, the Afro-Diasporic experience, the relationship between politics and literature, literature of human rights, as well as Brazilian Cinema and Popular Culture. Her manuscript Writing Identity: The Politics of Contemporary Afro-Brazilian Literature (Purdue UP, 2007) examines the intricate connections between literary production and political action by focusing on the politics of the Brazilian black movement and the literature of a São Paulo-based group of Afro-Brazilian writers, the Quilombhoje. She is currently working on a second book manuscript tentatively entitled Obama Is Brazilian: (Re)Signifying Race Relations In Contemporary Brazil. This study examines Obama’s characterizations in the Brazilian media, especially ones of political humor, such as cartoons and Internet memes. She has also published several articles in professional journals and anthologies and translated Carolina Maria de Jesus’ Diário de Bitita (M.E. Sharpe, 1998).

Professor Oliveira-Monte serves the profession through committees in several professional associations, including the Brazilian Studies Association (2004-2008), the Brazilian section of the Latin American Studies Association), and the Luso-Brazilian section of the Modern Language Association (2010-present). She is also a member of the editorial board of the Afro-Hispanic Review, Chasqui, and Transmodernity: Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World. In 2011, she was guest-editor (together with Isis Costa McElroy) of a special issue of the Afro-Hispanic Review on the Afro-Brazilian Diaspora.

Video of the Lecture

Breaking Issue: The Iran Nuclear Deal

Iran Nuclear Deal PosterTuesday, November 10, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:30 p.m.

Dickinson  Panelists:

Andrea Lieber, associate professor of religion and Judaic studies
Jeffrey McCausland, visiting professor of international security studies
Edward Webb, associate professor of political science and international studies
Anthony Williams (moderator), visiting professor of political science and security studies

On July 11th, 2015, Iran and a group of six nations led by the United States reached a historic agreement limiting Tehran’s nuclear ability in exchange for lifting international oil and financial sanctions. The overall goal of the accord is to increase Iran’s “breakout time” – the time it would take Iran to make enough material for a single nuclear weapon. Critics of the negotiation question the verifiability of the constraints and the long-term impact on  regional and world stability.  The panel, comprised of Dickinson College faculty members, will explore the historic negotiation and its international policy, security and cultural implications.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues. It is was also initiated by the Student Project Managers of the Clarke Forum.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

lieberAndrea Lieber is associate professor of religion and Sophia Ava Asbell Chair of Judaic Studies.  She is the author of The Essential Guide to Jewish Prayer and Practices, and has published articles on a diverse range of topics within the field of religion, from early Jewish and Christian origins to contemporary issues related to religion and technology. Her courses at Dickinson focus on both classical and contemporary issues, such as Judaism in the Time of Jesus, Women, Gender & Judaism and Jewish Environmental Ethics. All of her courses address the complexities of the relationship between Jewish life in “the diaspora” and Israel, both ancient and modern.

JeffHeadshot_HighResJeffrey McCausland is the founder and CEO of Diamond6 Leadership and Strategy, LLC and a visiting professor of international studies at Dickinson College. He serves as the senior fellow at the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership at the United States Naval Academy and the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. McCausland is a retired colonel from the U.S. Army and completed his active duty in 2002 culminating his career as dean of academics at the U.S. Army War College.  During his military career he served as director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council Staff and he also commanded a field artillery battalion during Operations Desert Storm and Shield. McCausland has experience working on nuclear weapons, arms control, and multilateral negotiations during his time working in the Pentagon and subsequently on the National Security Council staff in the White House.  He has provided extensive commentary and analysis on the Iran nuclear issue for for CBS radio and television.

Edshot_Mar11Ed Webb served with Britain’s Diplomatic Service 1992-2000, much of that time in Cairo, before completing a Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania. Associate professor of political science and international studies, and currently chair of the political science department, he helped establish Dickinson’s Middle East studies program and also contributes to the security studies certificate. Author of Media in Egypt and Tunisia: From Control to Transition? (Palgrave 2014), he has also published articles and book chapters on authoritarianism, education policies in Turkey and Tunisia, censorship in the Arab world, and Doctor Who. He is active in international debates on a range of issues, particularly but not limited to Middle East politics: you can find him on Twitter via @edwebb.

Headshot 1Anthony R. Williams is currently visiting professor of security studies at Dickinson College where he specializes in international terrorism and international intelligence studies. He is a retired U.S. senior intelligence officer serving for 32 years. Williams also held the Francis De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the US Army War College from 2008 to 2012. During his professional life he focused on arms control and weapons proliferation matters in addition to other fields of activity. For example, he served on the support team that negotiated the Intermediate Nuclear Force Treaty between the US and the USSR in 1988. Later in his career he supervised the US Intelligence Community’s Weapons Interdiction Group which focused on weapons of mass destruction materials and components. He has been on the adjunct faculty at Dickinson College since 2004.

Video of Panel Discussion for Campus Viewing Only

 

 

 

Doris Fuller

Doris Fuller PosterTreatment Advocacy Center, Arlington, VA

The New Asylums: Mentally Ill and Behind Bars

Thursday, November 5, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

In the 1930s, barely one in 100 jail inmates had a serious mental illness. Today, the most conservative estimates are one in five jail inmates and even more of the prison population. With video, personal story and professional insight, Fuller will discuss the role of mental illness in turning the U.S. into the world leader in incarceration and discuss practical measures to curb this trend.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Life, health studies and the department of psychology. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States. 

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Doris-Fuller-SeriousDoris A. Fuller is chief of research and public affairs, where she conducts and directs the Treatment Advocacy Center’s original studies abd research-driven communications, including public education related to mental illness.

Fuller has co-authored several recent studies from the Treatment Advocacy Center, including:

She also co-directed the organization’s documentary short, “Mental Illness on Trial” and other video productions.

A frequent guest on national TV and radio, often quoted in print and author of many timely op-eds, Fuller is an author of books, former award-winning journalist and mother of a daughter who experienced a first psychotic break as a college student. Doris described her daughter’s struggles with severe mental illness and March 2015 suicide in a feature for the Washington Post, “How the ‘Demons’ Took My Daughter,” which has been read by millions of readers worldwide.

Doris joined the Treatment Advocacy Center in 2010 as director of communications and subsequently served as executive director for three years before being named to found and build the organization’s new Office of Research and Public Affairs.

Video of the Lecture

Nikki Jones

Nikki Jones Final PosterUniversity of California, Berkeley

How Things Fall Apart: Race and Suspicion in Police-Civilian Encounters

Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Drawing on years of field research among Black residents in urban neighborhoods, interviews with police, and videorecordings of police-civilian encounters, sociologist Nikki Jones illustrates how race, suspicion and bias shape the earliest moments of such encounters. She will also share findings from her research which reveals key interactional adjustments that could be used to improve the quality of police encounters with the public.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of women’s and gender studies, educational studies, policy studies, and sociology. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States, and its Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

_EmilyKiyomiPhotography 06172Biography (Link to UC Berkeley Web site)

Nikki Jones is an associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also a faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Her areas of expertise include urban ethnography, race and ethnic relations and criminology and criminal justice, with a special emphasis on the intersection of race, gender, and justice. Professor Jones has published three books, including the sole-authored Between Good and Ghetto: African American Girls and Inner City Violence (2010), published in the Rutgers University Press Series in Childhood Studies (betweengoodandghetto.com). Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals in sociology, gender studies, and criminology. Jones’ next book, based on several years of field research in a San Francisco neighborhood, examines how African American men with criminal histories change their lives, and their place in the neighborhood once they do. Her current research draws on the systematic analysis of video records that document routine encounters between police and civilians, including young Black men’s frequent encounters with the police. Professor Jones is the past-Chair of the American Sociological Association’s Race, Gender and Class Section (2012-13). She also serves on the editorial boards of the Contexts and Feminist Criminology. Jones has received awards for her research and publications including the William T. Grant Award for Early Career Scholars (2007-12) and the New Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Women and Crime (2010) and Division on People of Color and Crime (2009). Before joining the faculty at Cal Professor Jones was on faculty in the Department of Sociology at UC-Santa Barbara (from 2004-2013). She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology and Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Video of the Lecture

Interview with Clarke Forum Student Project Manager Rehoboth Gesese ’17

John Geer

GeerPosterVanderbilt University

The Bruce R. Andrews Lecture

Attacking Democracy

Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Conventional wisdom says negative political attacks undermine democracy. This lecture will argue, instead, that “attack politics” advance democratic governance.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Bruce R. Andrews Fund and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

John G. Geer is vice provost for Academic and Strategic Affairs at Vanderbilt University, interim dean of the Graduate School, and the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Political Science.  He earned his Ph.D. in 1986 from Princeton University.  Geer is past editor of The Journal of Politics. Geer has published widely on campaigns, elections, and public opinion.  He is author of In Defense of Negativity: Attack Ads in Presidential Campaigns, which won Harvard University’s Goldsmith Prize in 2008.  Geer has recently published the third edition of Gateways to Democracy (2015).  He has provided extensive commentary in the news media about American politics, including live nationwide interviews for FOX, CNN, NBC, CBS, MSNBC, ABC, and NPR.  Geer has also written numerous op-ed pieces for Politico, The Washington Post, LA Times, USA Today, and Chicago Tribune.  His lecturing has earned him a number of awards at Vanderbilt, including the “Squirrel Award,” the 2004 Birkby Prize, the 2005 Jeffrey Nordhaus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the 2009 the Ellen Gregg Ingalls Award for Excellence in Classroom Teaching, and the 2014 Vanderbilt Alumni Education Award.  He is also co-director of the Vanderbilt Poll.

The Bruce R. Andrews Lecture
Until he passed away on January 8, 2005 Bruce R. Andrews was Robert Blaine Weaver Professor Emeritus of Political Science. Bruce taught at Dickinson from 1960 until his retirement in 1992. Recipient of The John J. Curley and Ann Conser Curley Faculty Chair in 2003, Bruce was one of the college’s most distinguished and influential professors in the last 50 years. Bruce was loved and respected by students, colleagues on the faculty and staff, and many friends he and his wife Margery and children Stephen, Mary-Margaret and Carolyn had and have in the Carlisle community. His warm and engaging personality, deep knowledge of American politics, commitment to the liberal arts and active role as a citizen brightened and informed everything he did at Dickinson. As a living memorial to the example Professor Andrews set as a teacher, mentor and friend, those who knew him have endowed the Bruce R. Andrews Fund to continue the kind of vibrant discussion of politics and public life to which Bruce devoted his life.

 

Video of the Lecture

Interview with John Geer by Sam Weisman ’18

 

Steven Strogatz – “Joseph Priestley Award Recipient”

Strogatz PosterCornell University

Joseph Priestley Award Celebration Lecture

Synchronization in Nature

Monday, October 12, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Strogatz will discuss spectacular examples of synchronization in nature, from rhythmically flashing fireflies to crowds of pedestrians that inadvertently caused London’s Millennium Bridge to wobble on its opening day.

The Joseph Priestley Award recipient is chosen by a different science department each year.  The Department of Physics and Astronomy has selected this year’s recipient, Steven Strogatz. The event is supported by the College’s Priestley Fund and is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Student Senate and the Churchill Fund  and co-sponsored by the departments of physics and astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, environmental studies, math & computer science, and psychology.

Photo Credit: John GrooBiography (provided by the speaker)

Steven Strogatz is the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University. He works in the areas of nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, often on topics inspired by the curiosities of everyday life. He studied at Princeton, Cambridge, and Harvard and taught at MIT before moving to Cornell in 1994. A renowned teacher and one of the world’s most highly cited mathematicians, he has blogged about math for the New York Times and has been a frequent guest on RadioLab. His honors include a Presidential Young Investigator Award; MIT’s highest teaching prize; a lifetime achievement award for the communication of mathematics to the general public; the Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science; and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, Sync, and The Calculus of Friendship. His latest book, The Joy of x, has been translated into 15 languages.

Joseph Priestley Lecture
The Priestley Award is presented by Dickinson College in memory of Joseph Priestley, discoverer of oxygen, to a distinguished scientist whose work has contributed to the welfare of humanity. The Priestley Award, first presented in 1952, recognizes outstanding achievement and contribution to our understanding of science and the world.

Video of the Lecture

 

Christopher Wildeman ’02

Wildeman Final PosterCornell University

With Comments by Lauren Porter ’06, University of Maryland

Family Life in an Era of Mass Incarceration

Tuesday, October 6, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

This lecture will consider the implications of mass incarceration for American families, focusing especially on the consequences of men’s incarceration for their parents, partner, and progeny.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and is part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States.

portrait_cjw279 from Cornell Web siteBiographies (provided by the speakers)

Christopher Wildeman is an associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University. He is also currently a senior researcher at the Rockwool Foundation Research Unit in Copenhagen, Denmark (since 2015) and a visiting fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics in Washington, D.C. (since 2013). Prior to joining Cornell’s faculty, he was an associate professor of sociology at Yale University (from 2010-2014) and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Michigan (from 2008-2010). He received his Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Princeton University in 2008 and his B.A. in philosophy, sociology, and Spanish from Dickinson College in 2002. His interests revolve around the consequences of mass imprisonment for inequality, with emphasis on families, health, and children. He is also interested in child welfare, especially as relates to child maltreatment and the foster care system. He is the 2008 recipient of the Dorothy S. Thomas Award from the Population of America and the 2013 recipient of the Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology.

 Lauren Porter (Link to University of Maryland Web site)

 Video of the Lecture

Interview with Christopher Wildeman ’02 by Julia Mercer ’18

Patricia Hill Collins – “Morgan Lecturer”

PHC Final PosterUniversity of Maryland

Intersectionality, Black Youth and Political Activism

Thursday, October 1, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

This talk examines how intersectional frameworks shed light on new directions for anti-racist activism, especially among African American youth.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, Division of Student Life, the departments of sociology, women’s and gender studies, Africana studies, American studies, anthropology, English, history,  philosophy, and political science. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States and the Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

PatriciaHillCollins_2014 Head ShotBiography (provided by the speaker)

Patricia Hill Collins is Distinguished University Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park and Charles Phelps Taft Emeritus Professor of Sociology within the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Cincinnati. Her award-winning books include Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment (1990, 2000) which received both the Jessie Bernard Award of the American Sociological Association (ASA) and the C. Wright Mills Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems; and Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism (2004) which received ASA’s 2007 Distinguished Publication Award. She is also author of Fighting Words: Black Women and the Search for Justice (1998); From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism (2005); Another Kind of Public Education: Race, Schools, the Media, and Democratic Possibilities (2009); The Handbook of Race and Ethnic Studies (2010) edited with John Solomos; and On Intellectual Activism (2013). Her anthology Race, Class, and Gender: An Anthology, 9th edition (2015), edited with Margaret Andersen, is widely used in undergraduate classrooms in over 200 colleges and universities.

Professor Collins has taught at several institutions, held editorial positions with professional journals, lectured widely in the United States and internationally, served in many capacities in professional organizations, and has acted as consultant for a number of community organizations. In 2008, she became the 100th President of the American Sociological Association, the first African American woman elected to this position in the organization’s 104-year history. Her next book, Intersectionality, co-authored with Sirma Bilge, will be published in 2016 as part of Polity Press’s Key Concepts Series.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber and Kay Redfield Jamison.

Video of the Lecture

Bob Weick

Weick PosterActor and Monologist, Featured as Karl Marx

Marx in Soho by Howard Zinn

Monday, September 28, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.

Karl Marx launches into a passionate, funny and moving defense of his life and political ideas in Howard Zinn’s brilliant and timely play, Marx in Soho.

The presentation is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of economics and sociology.

Marx Photo with ManifestoBiography (provided by the speaker)

Bob Weick, is the national touring actor of Howard Zinn’s, Marx in Soho. The celebrated actor and Barrymore Award nominee has presented over 250 performances of Zinn’s play from Maine to California. A farrier by trade, Bob began his acting career in 1995 and in the aftermath of the 2000 election, 9/11, and the 2003 invasion of Iraq, chose to use his talent to contribute to the education and engagement of students and citizens.

Related Links
www.ironagetheatre.orghttp://phindie.com/howard-zinn-bob-weick-peoples-history-6757/

Video of Performance for Campus-Viewing Only

Interview with Bob Weick

Anthony Ingraffea

Ingraffea PosterCornell University

Shale Gas and Oil Development: Latest Evidence on Leaky Wells, Methane Emissions, and Energy Policy

Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.
(360 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA)

Ingraffea will discuss the myths and realities concerning large-scale development of unconventional natural gas/oil resources in shale deposits on both a local and global scale.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund,  Center for Sustainability Education, department of environmental studies and Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM). The program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s  Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Dr Ingraffea_ithaca fallsBiography (provided by the speaker)

Dr. Ingraffea is the Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering Emeritus and a Weiss Presidential Teaching Fellow at Cornell University where he has been since 1977. He holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado. Dr. Ingraffea’s research concentrates on computer simulation and physical testing of complex fracturing processes. He and his students performed pioneering research in the use of interactive computer graphics and realistic representational methods in computational fracture mechanics. He has authored with his students and research associates over 250 papers in these areas, and is director of the Cornell Fracture Group (www.cfg.cornell.edu). Since 1977, he has been a principal or co-principal investigator on over $36M in R&D projects from the NSF, EXXON, NASA Langley, Nichols Research, NASA Glenn, AFOSR, FAA, Kodak, U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Transportation, IBM, Schlumberger, Gas Technology Institute, Sandia National Laboratories, the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers, General Dynamics, Boeing, Caterpillar Tractor, DARPA, and Northrop Grumman. Professor Ingraffea was a member of the first group of Presidential Young Investigators named by the National Science Foundation in 1984. For his research achievements in hydraulic fracturing he has won the International Association for Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics “1994 Significant Paper Award”, and he has twice won the National Research Council/U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics Award for Research in Rock Mechanics (1978, 1991). He became a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1991, and named the Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering at Cornell in 1992.   His group won a NASA Group Achievement Award in 1996, and a NASA Aviation Safety /Turning Goals into Reality Award in 1999 for its work on the aging aircraft problem. He became co-dditor-in-chief of Engineering Fracture Mechanics in 2005. In 2006, he won ASTM’s George Irwin Medal for outstanding research in fracture mechanics, and in 2009 was named a Fellow of the International Congress on Fracture. TIME Magazine named him one of its “People Who Mattered” in 2011, and he became the first president of Physicians, Scientists, and Engineers for Healthy Energy, Inc. (www.psehealthyenergy.org) in that same year. He is a co-author of recent papers on wellbore integrity in Pennsylvania (2014), and on conversion of New York (2012) and California (2014) to wind/sun/water power for all energy uses in the next few decades.

Video of the Lecture

Rush Holt

Final Holt PosterAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

The Glover Memorial Lecture
Advancing Science

Wednesday, September 9, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.
(360 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA)

Science is, as physician and essayist Lewis Thomas wrote, the “shrewdest maneuver” for discovering the world. Asking questions that can be answered empirically and engaging in open communication so that others can collectively review and verify possible answers lead to the most reliable knowledge—a knowledge that is powerfully applicable in daily life. To thrive, however, science needs the support of the society it serves, and that support must be cultivated.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Glover Memorial Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of physics, policy studies and political Science. This program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Rush D. Holt, Ph.D., became the 18th chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of the Science family of journals in February 2015. In this role, Holt leads the world’s largest multi-disciplinary scientific and engineering society.

Over his long career, Dr. Holt has held positions as a teacher, scientist, administrator, and policymaker. From 1987 to 1998, Holt was assistant director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), a Department of Energy national lab, which is the largest research facility of Princeton University and one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country. At PPPL, Holt helped establish the lab’s nationally renowned science education program. From 1980 to 1988, Holt served on the faculty of Swarthmore College, where he taught courses in physics and public policy. In 1982, he took leave from Swarthmore to serve as an AAAS/American Physical Society Science and Technology Policy Fellow on Capitol Hill. The Fellowships program, dating to 1973, places outstanding scientists and engineers in executive, legislative, and Congressional branch assignments for one or two years; by early 2015, the program had served nearly 3,000 alumni working worldwide in the policy, academic, industry, and nonprofit realms. Holt has said that his AAAS S&T Policy Fellowship was “life changing,” and served as a springboard to his role in Congress. He also served as an arms control expert at the U.S. State Department, where he monitored the nuclear programs of countries such as Iraq, Iran, North Korea, and the former Soviet Union. In 1981, Holt was issued a patent for an improved solar-pond technology for harnessing energy from sunlight.

Before coming to AAAS, Holt served for 16 years as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. In Congress, Holt served as a senior member of the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. On Capitol Hill, Holt established a long track record of advocacy for federal investment in research and development, science education, and innovation. He served on the National Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics and Science (known as the Glenn Commission), founded the Congressional Research and Development Caucus, and served as a co-chair of the Biomedical Research Caucus. Holt served eight years on the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and, from 2007 to 2010, chaired the Select Intelligence Oversight Panel, which worked to strengthen legislative oversight of the intelligence community. His legislative work earned him numerous accolades, including being named one of Scientific American magazine’s “50 National Visionaries Contributing to a Brighter Technological Future” and a “Champion of Science” by the Science Coalition. He has also received awards from the American Chemical Society, the American Association of University Professors, the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Council of Scientific Society Presidents, the American Geophysical Union, and the Biotechnology Industry Organization. Holt is also a past recipient of two of AAAS’ highest honors: the William D. Carey Lectureship Award (2005) and the Philip Hauge Abelson Award (2010).

From December 2014 to February 2015, Holt was appointed a Director’s Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

Holt is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from New York University. He is an elected fellow of AAAS, the American Physical Society, and Sigma Xi, and he holds honorary degrees from Monmouth University, Rider University, and Thomas Edison State College. He is married to Margaret Lancefield, a physician, and they have three children and seven grandchildren.

The Glover Memorial Lecture

The Glover Memorial Lectures are usually presented in alternate years. This lectureship in science was established in 1958 in memory of John Glover of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, the inventor of the Glover Tower, and in memory of his son and grandson, Henry and Lester Glover, by the late Dr. John D. Yeagley and Mrs. Yeagley of York, Pennsylvania. Recent Glover Lectures include Peter Brancazio’s “Sports on the Moon,” Clint Sprott on “The New Science of Chaos,” Dr. Dorrit Hoffleit’s presentation on “A Century of Women in Astronomy,” Lawrence Krauss’ lecture on “The Physics of Star Trek,” Albert Bartlett’s lecture on “Arithmetic, Population, and Energy,” and David Lee’s lecture on “Superconductivity and Superfluidity: A Century of Discovery.”

Video of the Lecture

Peterson Toscano – (Second Night of Two Performances)

Toscano Final PosterTheatrical Performer, Bible Scholar and LGBTQ Activist

Peterson Unplugged

Wednesday, April 22, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

With sparkling social commentary, Peterson Toscano, a bible scholar, an LGBTQ activist, and a skilled actor, will share excerpts from his original one-person comedies. These comedies include:  Doin’ Time in the Homo No Mo Halfway HouseJesus Had Two DaddiesTransfigurations—Transgressing Gender in the Bible, and Does this Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat?

Tonight is the second evening of two performances. The first performance, Climate Change: What’s Faith Got to Do with It? is scheduled for Tuesday, April 21 at 7 p.m.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Life, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, Office of Community Service and Religious Life, Center for Sustainability Education and Office of LGBTQ Services.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Toscano PicPeterson Toscano is a theatrical performance activist using comedy and storytelling to address social justice concerns. He spent 17 years and over $30,000 on three continents attempting (and failing) to change his same-sex orientation. He is the author of one-person comedies including, Queer 101–Now I Know My gAy,B,C’s, Jesus Had Two Daddies, and Doin’ Time in the Homo No Mo Halfway House, which chronicles his two years in “gay rehab” in Memphis, TN. With his play, Transfigurations–Transgressing Gender in the Bible, Peterson has delighted diverse audiences and received high praise for his ground-breaking, genre-bending, gender blending Bible scholarship wrapped up in a performance. He is the host of the Climate Stew Show. His newest play, Does This Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat? is a comedy about broken things and provides an LGBTQ response to climate change.

Video of Lecture

Peterson Toscano – (First Night of Two Performances)

Toscano Climate Change PosterTheatrical Performance Activist

Climate Change: What’s Faith Got to Do with It?

Tuesday, April 21, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

People are searching for new ways of looking at climate change. Peterson Toscano provides a lively, insightful, and hilarious presentation that helps his audiences wrap their heads and hearts around global warming.

Tonight is the first night of two performances. The second performance, Peterson Unplugged, is scheduled for Wednesday, April 22 at 7 p.m.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Life, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, Office of Community Service and Religious Life, and Center for Sustainability Education.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Toscano PicPeterson Toscano is a theatrical performance activist using comedy and storytelling to address social justice concerns. He spent 17 years and over $30,000 on three continents attempting (and failing) to change his same-sex orientation. He is the author of one-person comedies including, Queer 101–Now I Know My gAy,B,C’s, Jesus Had Two Daddies, and Doin’ Time in the Homo No Mo Halfway House, which chronicles his two years in “gay rehab” in Memphis, TN. With his play, Transfigurations–Transgressing Gender in the Bible, Peterson has delighted diverse audiences and received high praise for his ground-breaking, genre-bending, gender blending Bible scholarship wrapped up in a performance. He is the host of the Climate Stew Show. His newest play, Does This Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat? is a comedy about broken things and provides an LGBTQ response to climate change.

 

Akbar Ahmed

Ahmed posterAmerican University

Islam & the West: A Clash of Civilizations?

Wednesday, April 15 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Ahmed will explore Samuel Huntington’s thesis of a clash of civilizations and challenge it in light of his own research examining relations between the West and the World of Islam after 9/11.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Political Science,  Middle East Studies, Sociology and the Churchill Fund. This program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, War at Home, and the Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

akbar-ahmed-hi-resBiography (provided by the speaker)

Ambassador Akbar Ahmed is the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington, D.C. He has served as a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and was the first distinguished chair of Middle East and Islamic studies at the U.S Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Ahmed belonged to the senior Civil Service of Pakistan and was the Pakistan High Commissioner to the U.K. and Ireland. Previously, Ahmed was the Iqbal Fellow (Chair of Pakistan Studies) and Fellow of Selwyn College at the University of Cambridge. He has also taught at Harvard and Princeton Universities. He is the author of over a dozen award-winning books including a quartet of studies published by Brookings Press examining relations between the West and the World of Islam after 9/11: Journey into Islam: The Crisis of Globalization (2007), Journey into America: The Challenge of Islam (2010), The Thistle and the Drone: How America’s War on Terror Became a Global War on Tribal Islam (2013), and Journey into Europe: Islam, Immigration, and Empire (forthcoming).

Video of the Lecture

Catherine Clinton

Clinton PosterUniversity of Texas at San Antonio

Mary Lincoln’s Assassination

Monday, April 13, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Lincoln’s assassination on April 14, 1865 proved a momentous evening for the people of Washington, for the people of the American nation – and its impact would be felt across the world. But perhaps the person most affected by this epic tragedy was Abraham Lincoln’s widow, Mary Lincoln– whose fate would be forever transformed by the death of her husband that Easter Saturday.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the House Divided Project and the Digital Humanities Advisory Committee.

Catherine Clinton 2Biography Forthcoming (provided by the speaker)

Catherine Clinton earned her undergraduate degree in African American studies from Harvard, her master’s in American studies from the University of Sussex and received her doctorate in history from Princeton in 1980. She now  holds the Denman Chair of American History at the University of Texas San Antonio and is an international research professor at Queen’s University Belfast. She has written and edited over two dozen books to date, including three biographies, Fanny Kemble Civil Wars (2000), Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom (2004)–which was named as one of the best nonfiction books of 2004 by the Christian Science Monitor and the Chicago Tribune—and Mrs. Lincoln: A Life (2009). She is currently working on a study of soldiers diagnosed with insanity and confined to St. Elizabeth’s hospital in Civil War Washington.

Video of the Lecture

Paul Mayewski

Mayewski PosterUniversity of Maine

The Limits of Climate Change

Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

To understand and predict climate change requires more perspective than is available from a short instrumental climate record.  To expand the climate record in time and space, Mayewski and his teams have recovered ice cores from some of the remotest high and cold places on Earth.  These records tell us a great deal about where we are today in the climate system and enable us to chart the pathways for future mitigation, adaptation and sustainability in the decades ahead.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

MayewskiCroppedDr. Paul Andrew Mayewski is director and professor of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine and has academic affiliations with the university’s School of Earth and Climate Sciences, School of Policy and International Affairs, and School of Marine Sciences. He is an internationally acclaimed scientist and explorer, leader of more than 55 expeditions to some of the remotest reaches of the planet including many field seasons traveling across previously unexplored regions of Antarctica, many first ascents of mountains and considerable high altitude experience in the Himalayas and Andes.

Mayewski has over 360 publications and two popular books, The Ice Chronicles and Journey Into Climate.  His contributions to science include discovery of: human impacts on the chemistry of the atmosphere; modern Antarctic and Himalayan ice loss; abrupt climate change; and the impact of climate change on past civilizations. He has received numerous honors including the first-ever internationally awarded Medal for Excellence in Antarctic Research, the International Glaciological Society Seligman Crystal (highest in his field), and the Explorers Club Lowell Thomas Medal; developed several highly prominent international research programs in Antarctica, Greenland and Asia and public outreach efforts with organizations such as the American Museum of Natural History and the Boston Museum of Science; and appeared hundreds of times in the media (eg., NOVA, NPR, NBC, BBC, CBS 60 Minutes and most recently ShowTime’s Emmy Award winning climate change series Years of Living Dangerously).

Related Links

http://climatechange.umaine.edu/

http://journeyintoclimate.com

http://climatechangeinsights.org/

Video of the Lecture