Media

Pennsylvania’s 199th District Debate

199th Debate PosterJill Bartoli (D) vs. Stephen Bloom (R)

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 – 7 p.m.
NEW LOCATION:  Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium

The Republican and Democratic candidates running in the general November election for the 199th seat in the Pennsylvania state legislature will debate the central issues confronting local voters and answer questions from the audience. The event will be moderated by Michelle Crowley, president and CEO of the Greater Carlisle Area Chamber of Commerce.

This event is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Greater Carlisle Area Chamber of Commerce, American Association of University Women (AAUW), the League of Women Voters,  YWCA Carlisle and The Sentinel.

Biographies

Jill ProfileJill Bartoli (provided by Bartoli)

I have lived in Cumberland County for my entire life, growing up in a rural area near Cumberland Valley High School, which was built when I was in third grade.  So my first three years of school were in a one room country school house, with a pot-bellied stove and an outhouse, that had grades one to eight.

Growing up, I was a member of the 4-H Baby Lamb Club and 4-H Horse and Pony Club, and I took ballet lessons from Marcia Dale Weary when she was just beginning to teach in Carlisle in the 1950s.  When I was a high school student, CVHS was nicknamed “Cow Valley” because many of us were from farm families.   In addition to farming, my parents began several small businesses, including a successful restaurant business in New Kingston called The Country House.

After college I taught at Cumberland Valley High School for five years, then married Jim Bartoli and moved to the “big city” of Carlisle, where we raised our five children, three of whom have made their home in Cumberland County.   My four sons and daughter spent their elementary years at St. Patrick School, then attended Carlisle High School, followed by Elizabethtown College where I taught for 20 years.  Our sons, David and Stephen, each have four children, making me the proud grandmother of eight.

My university education began in 1963 at Penn State with a scholarship from the Capital Area Science Fair, continued in 1977 with a master’s in reading from Shippensburg University, and ended in 1986 with a doctorate from University of  Pennsylvania in language arts and family literacy.

After 17 years of motherhood, raising my five children, I began teaching at Elizabethtown College in 1990.   I taught reading and language arts, diversity issues, and urban education for 20 years, along with developing service learning programs for social work and education majors.

Marion Wright Edelman of the Children’s Defense Fund said it best: “Service is the rent we pay for living.”   The desire to serve my community as a State Representative, and to better understand and give voice to their values and concerns, is at the heart of my campaign.

Stephen BloomStephen Bloom (provided by Bloom)

Stephen Bloom was first elected to represent the citizens of the 199th District in the Pennsylvania House in 2010. His mission as a lawmaker is to cut the size and scope of government, reduce the burden of taxes and unnecessary regulation, defend constitutional liberties, and unleash the power of free enterprise to create jobs and prosperity. In the 2013-14 legislative session, Stephen was selected to serve on the following House committees: Finance; Agriculture and Rural Affairs; Labor and Industry; and Children and Youth. He has been named a “Guardian of Small Business” by the National Federation of Independent Business, a “Defender of Liberty” by the American Conservative Union, and a “Friend of Agriculture” by the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.

Stephen is an active member of the Carlisle Alliance Church. He authored the books, “The Believer’s Guide to Legal Issues” and “They’ve Crossed the Line: A Patriot’s Guide to Religious Freedom.” He has been a practicing lawyer for more than 25 years, and taught courses in economics, personal finance, and business law at Messiah College.

Stephen earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics and rural sociology from Penn State University in 1983 and graduated from The Dickinson School of Law in 1987, where he attained membership in the Woolsack Honor Society. He is a 1979 graduate of Penncrest High School in Media, Delaware County, where he was inducted into the Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame in 2013.

He currently resides in North Middleton Township, Cumberland County, with his wife, Sharon. They have three grown children, a daughter-in-law, and two grandsons.

Video of the Debate

 

Regionalism in Pennsylvania: Is Bigger Always Better?

Regionalism Final PosterWednesday, October 15, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Ronald Bailey, executive director, Chester County Planning Commission
Elam Herr, assistant executive director, Penn State Assoc. of Twp. Supervisors
Steve Kusheloff, manager, public information, SEDA-COG
Kirk Stoner (moderator), director of planning, Cumberland County

This program will provide an overview of how Pennsylvania developed its system of local government. Local officials will present stories of achievement and lessons learned from specific examples of regional cooperation to identify the principles that will be the foundation for future success.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Greater Carlisle Area Chamber of Commerce.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Ronald BaileyRonald T. Bailey, AICP is the executive director of the Chester County Planning Commission. Mr. Bailey also serves as a member of the Pennsylvania State Planning Board and is a senior research fellow with the Floyd Institute for Public Policy at Franklin and Marshall College. Previously, Mr. Bailey was the executive director of the Lancaster County Planning Commission. Prior to coming to Pennsylvania, he worked in state and local government the Pacific Northwest. He holds a bachelor of science from the California State University at Sacramento and a master of science from Southern Oregon State University. Mr. Bailey is the author of a biography of a frontier photographer, published by Ohio University Press.

Elam Herr, Asst. Ex. Dir.Elam Herr is the assistant executive director for the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors, and has been with the Association  since 1976. Herr primarily represents the Association before the Pennsylvania General Assembly and executive departments on legislative and policy matters affecting Pennsylvania townships. He is also responsible for the planning, development and administration of the Association.

He holds a master’s of public administration, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh, and a bachelor of arts degree in history and political science from Millersville State College.

Steve K2Steve Kusheloff became Manager for Public Information at SEDA-COG in 1977, following a brief career in broadcast news.  In 1977, media was primarily newspapers, radio, and television.  Public information and outreach was largely limited to print-based vehicles, e.g., brochures, news releases.  Today SEDA-COG maintains a significant presence on Facebook, Twitter, and its website.  The organization electronically distributes a monthly newsletter to 8,500 e-mail addresses.  However the basics of public information remain the same — tell a story.  Let the reader/viewer know how it may impact them and their community.  Mr. Kusheloff is a 1973 graduate of the University of Delaware, where he majored in communications and completed a project based on Joe Biden’s first campaign for the United States Senate.  In the early 1980s Mr. Kusheloff was a member of the Sunbury City Council.  Later, he served six years on the Upper Augusta Township Municipal Authority.

head shotKirk Stoner is the director of planning for Cumberland County where he manages land use, transportation and environmental planning initiatives in cooperation with the county’s 33 municipal governments.  Prior to joining the county in 2003, Kirk worked for the Cumberland Area Economic Development Corporation as a business development specialist and Gannett Fleming as a transportation planning project manager.   Kirk is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners and was appointed by Governor Corbett in 2012 to serve on the Pennsylvania State Planning Board where he advises the Governor’s Office on planning, development and land use issues.  He is also the past president of the Planning Directors Association of Pennsylvania and past chairman of the South Middleton Township Zoning Hearing Board. Stoner received both a BS and MS from Shippensburg University in Geoenvironmental Studies with a land use specialization.  Kirk resides in Boiling Springs, PA and is an avid husband, father, golfer, and outdoorsman.

Video of the Lecture

 

 

 

 

Mark Price

Price PosterLabor Economist, Keystone Research Center

Fighting Runaway Inequality: The Minimum Wage Controversy

Tuesday, October 7, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Through the lens of the debate over the minimum wage, Price will explore the connections between public policy, the social sciences and one of the most pressing social issues of our time, the rise of income inequality.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Sociology,  Political Science, Economics, and American Studies.

Price_1Biography (provided by the speaker)

Mark Price has been the Keystone Research Center’s (KRC) labor economist for over a decade. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Utah in 2005. The KRC is a non-partisan research and policy development institute based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. His areas of research include income inequality, trends in employment and compensation, the construction industry, and low-wage labor markets. Mark’s work involves policy analysis and advocacy on a wide range of issues including, prevailing wage law, unemployment insurance, payday lending, economic and workforce development and tax and budget policy.  His advocacy involves fielding questions from reporters, testifying before the state legislature and making public presentations on current policy issues and research. Mark’s recent research has included an evaluation of the relationship between the state control of alcohol sales and alcohol related motor vehicle fatalities and an estimate of top incomes since 1917 in each state.  You can find Mark’s economic policy blog at thirdandstate.org.

Interview with Mark Price



Video of the Lecture

Trevor Aaronson

Aaronson Final Poster2Award-Winning Investigative Journalist

Inside the FBI’s Terror Factory

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room

Aaronson, author of The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism, will explore how the FBI has built up a network of more than 15,000 informants whose primary purpose is to infiltrate Muslim communities to create and facilitate phony terrorist plots so that the government can then claim victory in the War on Terror.  A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

The event is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of Middle East studies and religion.

Trevor_AaronsonBiography (provided by the speaker)

Trevor Aaronson is an accomplished investigative journalist and author of The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism.  Aaronson reported and produced a one-hour documentary for Al Jazeera Media Network, “Informants,” about the FBI’s counterterrorism program. He co-founded the nonprofit Florida Center for Investigative Reporting, which won national and regional journalism awards under his leadership, and has written for Mother Jones magazine. A two-time finalist for the Livingston Awards, Aaronson has won more than two dozen national and regional awards, including the Molly National Journalism Prize, the international Data Journalism Award and the John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award.

Related Links

Book Excerpt: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2013/01/terror-factory-fbi-trevor-aaronson-book

Trevor Aaronson’s Website

Video of the Lecture

 

Karen Thornber

Thornber PosterProfessor, Harvard University

Ecoambiguity: Asia and the Environmental Humanities

Thursday, September 18, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

This talk examines East Asian writing on environmental degradation, introducing the concept of ecoambiguity (environmental ambiguity) to highlight the contradictions in human behaviors vis-a-vis the nonhuman.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Department East Asian Studies.

Thornber photoBiography (provided by the speaker)

Karen Thornber is professor and chair of comparative literature, Harvard University; she is also chair of Harvard’s Regional Studies East Asia Program and holds an additional faculty appointment in Harvard’s Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations.  Thornber’s research and teaching focus on world literature, East Asian literatures, the literatures of the Indian Ocean Rim, postcolonialism, diaspora, environmental humanities, and medical humanities.

A 2006 Harvard Ph.D., her books include Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature (Harvard, 2009) and Ecoambiguity: Environmental Crises and East Asian Literatures (Michigan, 2012), both of which were awarded multiple international prizes.  She is the author of over 50 articles/chapters as well as of an award-winning translation of Japanese poetry; Thornber is additionally guest editor of a special issue of the journal Literature and Medicine (2013) on world literature and health. Working in over a dozen languages, Thornber is currently writing two books: Global World Literature and Health and Networking Literatures and Environments.

Video of the Lecture

 

Kate Martin – Constitution Day Address Lecturer

Director, Center for National Security Studies

Government SurveillMartin Final Posterance and the Bill of Rights

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

A former senior counter-terrorism official has said that existing surveillance capabilities are creating “the potential for a police state.” This lecture will address whether and how such capabilities can be reconciled with the Constitution’s prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures, its protections for freedom of speech and religion, as well as the demands of an open government in a democracy.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State Dickinson School of Law, and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Project on Civilian-Military Educational Cooperation. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

kate_martinBiography (provided by the speaker)

Kate Martin serves as director of the Center for National Security Studies, in Washington, D.C., the only think tank and advocacy organization devoted exclusively to preserving civil liberties in the national security context. Martin has served as director since 1992, having joined the Center as director of its Litigation Project in 1988 after 10 years as a lawyer in private practice.

Ms. Martin works to protect freedom of information, combat excessive government secrecy, prevent illegal government surveillance, assure effective oversight of intelligence agencies, protect the right of political dissent and the right to due process, ensure congressional authority in war powers, and protect the free exchange of ideas and information across international borders.

Martin testifies frequently before Congress. She regularly provides expert commentary in the media, appearing, for example, on The PBS News Hour and in-depth discussion shows on National Public Radio. She is regularly quoted in the print media, including The New York Times and the Washington Post. She has also has written extensively on these issues for more than twenty years.

Martin and the Center were awarded the 2005 Eugene S. Pulliam First Amendment Award by the Society for Professional Journalists for “years of working to protect open government and freedoms of speech and the press in the face of adversity in the name of national security.” She was inducted into the Freedom of Information Hall of Fame in 2001.

Martin’s court victories include obtaining an emergency order in 1989 on behalf of the National Security Archive that prevented the destruction of the Reagan White House e-mail messages and forcing the historic release of the intelligence budgets for 1997 and 1998 on behalf of the Federation of American Scientists.   After the attacks of September 11, she led the coalition challenge to the Justice Department’s extraordinary policy of arresting hundreds of people in secret and then deporting them after secret immigration hearings.

From 1993 to 2002, Martin worked in emerging democracies, with NGOs in Eastern Europe and Latin America to secure freedom of information and assist in establishing oversight and accountability of secret intelligence agencies. She was co-director with the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights in Warsaw of such a reform project in 12 former communist countries in Europe.

From 1995 to 2001, she also served as general counsel to the National Security Archive, a research library located at George Washington University. Martin has taught Strategic Intelligence and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law School and National Security Law at George Washington University. She is a member of the Liberty and Security Committee of The Constitution Project and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy.

Before joining the Center, Martin was a partner with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Nussbaum, Owen & Webster. She graduated from the University of Virginia Law School, where she was a member of the Law Review, and from Pomona College with a B.A. in philosophy cum laude.

Related Links:
For more writings about government surveillance:
http://cnss.org/pages/surveillance-cnss-work-on-surveillance-148.html
For government statements and disclosures: http://icontherecord.tumblr.com/

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address
The annual address is endowed through the generosity of Winfield C. Cook, former Dickinson Trustee. Each year the Clarke Forum invites a prominent public figure to campus to speak on a contemporary issue related to the Constitution. The event celebrates the signing of the United States Constitution and commemorates Dickinson’s connection to that document, through John Dickinson’s participation as an original signer. Previous speakers have included Kenneth Starr, Ira Glasser, Lowell Weicker, Marjorie Rendell, Tom Ridge and Michael Chertoff.

Interview with Kate Martin



Video of the Lecture

Joseph R. Núñez

Nunez Poster FinalColonel, U.S. Army (ret.)

** Breaking Issue **

ISIS in IRAQ: What are our Options?

Thursday, September 11, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

The brutal beheading of American journalist James Foley has dramatically raised the stakes regarding what policy the United States should pursue in reaction to the rise of ISIS in Iraq. Núñez, who served over five years in Iraq, will offer his assessment of the situation and discuss what he thinks is the best way forward.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Project on Civilian-Military Educational Cooperation.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Nunez (R) and Sheikh Abu ChaffatDr. Joseph R. Núñez spent 30 years in the army and retired as a colonel in 2007.  He had the privilege and opportunity to command at the company and battalion level, leading as many as 750 soldiers.  His primary specialty was logistics, which was well tested with a major deployment to Haiti in 1994 for Operations Restore and Uphold Democracy, as he was responsible for planning and executing all logistical support to the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) under very austere and challenging conditions.

Dr. Núñez two teaching assignments were at the U.S. Military Academy (West Point, NY: 1989-1992) and the U.S. Army War College (Carlisle, PA: 2001-2007).  He taught courses in political science, national security, and strategy.  He is a cum laude and distinguished military graduate of St. Lawrence University (1977) with a B.A. in government. Dr. Núñez also earned an M.A. degree in public administration (1989) and Ph.D. in foreign affairs from the University of Virginia (2006).  He won awards for his writing and has a record of opinion pieces in major newspapers, including the New York Times and the Financial Times.

Upon military retirement, Dr. Núñez was recruited to lead a team of experts/advisors in Iraq for the Department of Defense in Baghdad.  That led to a lateral move to the Department of State, where he first served as a senior provincial action officer on a Provincial Reconstruction Team and later as a senior political and economic advisor in our consulates in Kirkuk and Basrah.  He spent over five years serving in Iraq (2007-2013).

Video of the Lecture

 

Stephanie Kaza

Kaza PosterProfessor, University of Vermont

Buddhist Contributions to Climate Ethics

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

This lecture will draw on Buddhist environmental thought to explore climate change and consumerism looking at human behavior and ethical choice.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of East Asian Studies, Religion, the Center for Sustainability Education, and the Luce Foundation’s Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

stephanieDr. Stephanie Kaza is professor of environmental studies at the University of Vermont and director of the Environmental Program. Her courses include Unlearning Consumerism; Religion and Ecology; Women, Health, and Environment; and other values-based courses. She co-founded the Environmental Council at University of Vermont, a campus-wide consortium on sustainability, and is the faculty director for the UVM Office of Sustainability and Sustainability Faculty Fellows program. Her current scholarship focuses on Buddhist perspectives on climate ethics and bicycle commuting quality of life benefits.

Dr. Kaza is the 2011 winner of the UVM George V. Kidder Outstanding Faculty Award for excellence in teaching. Her books include Mindfully Green (2008), Hooked! Buddhist Writings on Greed, Desire, and the Urge to Consume (2005), Dharma Rain: Sources for Buddhist Environmentalism (2000, co-edited with Kenneth Kraft), and The Attentive Heart: Conversations with Trees (1993).   She serves on the executive councils of the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences and the U.S. Council of Environmental Deans and Directors and is a national leader in supporting interdisciplinary teaching and scholarship.

Video of the Lecture

 

 

World War I: The Consequences

WWI Poster FinalTuesday, September 9, 2014
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Wendy Moffat, professor, Dickinson College
Dominique Laurent, professor, Dickinson College
David Commins, professor, Dickinson College
Crystal Moten, professor, Dickinson College
Douglas Mastriano, professor, U.S. Army War College

In commemoration of the centennial anniversary of the start of World War I, this panel discussion will explore the consequences of this world-shattering event from multiple and diverse perspectives in an effort to better understand the impact that international conflicts can have on the social, economic, cultural, ethnic, and political dimensions of human life.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biographies (provided by the participants)moffat

Wendy Moffat, professor of English at Dickinson College, is the author of the award-winning biography A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E. M. Forster ( 2010.) A scholar of 20th century British and American culture, she is writing a dual biography of the psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Salmon and the war correspondent Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant in World War I.

 

Dominique Laurent began teaching at Dickinson in the falllaurent of 1995. He has taught all classes in the French program, including senior seminars such as “America in the Eyes of the French,” “France between the Wars,” and “The French Press.” He also teaches First Year Seminars (“The Great War” and “America in the Eyes of the World”). He directed the Toulouse Program from 1997 to 1999 and has served as department chair on three occasions. His research focuses on the image of America in the French press. He is currently working on the analysis of Woodrow Wilson’s image in the French press during the Paris Peace Conference (December 1918-June 1919).

comminsDavid Commins is a professor of history and the Benjamin Rush Chair in the Liberal Arts and Sciences (1987) at Dickinson College. His teaching interests are in modern Middle Eastern history with an emphasis on Islamic thought and political movements. His most recent book is The Gulf States: A Modern History. A new publication, Islam in Saudi Arabia, will be available later in 2014. His other books are The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia, Historical Dictionary of Syria, and Islamic Reform.  

 

Crystal M. Moten is a 20th century United States historian Moten picwith specialties in women’s/gender history and African American history. Her research examines black women’s struggles for economic justice in the 20th century urban north. Currently, she is working on manuscript which examines the history of black women’s economic thought in the post World War II industrial city of Milwaukee, WI.

 

Colonel Douglas Mastriano Ph.D. is director of Theater Intelligance at the U.S. Army War College.  A native of New Jersey, Colonel MastriMastriano picano joined the faculty of the U.S. Army War College in June 2012 and teaches in the Department of Military Strategy, Planning, and Operations.  He earned a Ph.D. in history in 2013 from the University of New Brunswick, in Fredericton, Canada.

The son of a career US Navy man, Colonel Mastriano was commissioned in the United States Army in 1986. He began his career on the Iron Curtain with the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment based out of Nuremberg, Germany. While serving along the East German and Czechoslovakian borders, he participated in the end of the Cold War and after this, deployed to Iraq for Operation Desert Storm. Here, his regiment led the main attack against Saddam’s elite Republican Guards. Having survived several close calls by God’s grace, he subsequently served in tactical, operational and strategic levels that included assignments in the Pentagon, the 3rd Infantry Division “Rock of the Marne,” and U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR) Contingency Plans. His most recent assignment was four years in NATO Land Headquarters in Germany, from where he deployed three times to Afghanistan. While in Afghanistan, he served as the director of the ISAF Joint Intelligence Center, with eighty soldiers from 18 NATO and non-NATO nations. After twelve moves, and living twelve years outside of the United States over the past twenty-five years, Colonel Mastriano is currently serving as faculty at the U.S. Army War College.

Doug is a military historian, a graduate of the Advanced Military Studies “Jedi” Course (School of Advanced Air and Space Studies (SAASS) and has a Ph.D. in history, master’s in military operational art and science, master’s in strategic intelligence, master’s in airpower theory, a master’s in strategic studies and a bachelor’s degree in history.   Doug led the effort to locate the spot where Alvin York in 1918 was awarded the Medal of Honor for eliminating a machinegun nest, and captured 132 Germans. Doug’s efforts were successful, with his work being endorsed by U.S. and French authorities. He led, planned and organized the construction of a five kilometer historic trail, replete with monuments and historic markers in the Argonne Forest, France for all visitors to walk where Sergeant York fought. His website www.sgtyorkdiscovery.com has details and maps. Doug’s book, Alvin York: a New Biography of the Hero of the Argonne, will be published in March 2014.

He is married to Rebecca (Stewart) of Sharpsville, PA. Their son Josiah is an Eagle Scout, recipient of the Duke of Edinburgh Bronze and Silver Awards and the Canadian Chief Scout Award.

Video of the Panel Discussion

World War I: The Causes

WWI Poster FinalMonday, September 8, 2014
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Kamaal Haque, professor, Dickinson College
Craig Nation, professor, U.S. Army War College
Michael Neiberg, professor, U.S. Army War College
Karl Qualls, professor, Dickinson College

In recognition of the centennial anniversary of the beginning of World War I, this panel discussion will address the causes of this world-changing event from multiple and diverse perspectives in an effort to better understand the origins of international conflicts.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biographies (provided by the participants)

haquekKamaal Haque is an assistant professor of German at Dickinson College. His research interests include German film, the literature and culture of the German-speaking Alps, and the influence of the Middle East in German culture. He has published on such diverse topics as the German mountain film, the poetry of Goethe, and Muslim minorities in Germany today. In addition to courses at all levels of German language and culture, he has taught recent courses such as Mountains in the German Cultural Imagination, Minority Cultures in the German Context and Modern German Film. This semester he is teaching German Literature and Culture of the First World War.

Craig Nation has served as a professor of strategy at the U.S. Nation 1Army War College and a visiting professor of security studies at Dickinson College since 1996. He holds a Ph.D. in modern history from Duke University. Professor Nation specializes in the modern history of the European and Eurasian areas with special emphasis on security affairs and war and peace issues. His publications include War On War (rev. ed., 2009), a history of anti-war movements in Europe during the First World War.

 
Michael Neiberg is professor of history in the Department of Natiohead shot 2013nal Security and Strategy at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, PA. His published work specializes on the First and Second World Wars, notably the American and French experiences. His most recent book on the First World War is Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I (Harvard University Press, 2011). In October, 2012 Basic Books published his The Blood of Free Men, a history of the liberation of Paris in 1944. In 2015 Basic will also publish his tentatively titled TERMINAL: The Potsdam Conference and the End of the Age of Total War in Europe, 1914-1945.

Qualls_5085Karl Qualls is professor of history at Dickinson College and specializes in Russian history. His first book, From Ruins to Reconstruction, details the rebuilding of Sevastopol, Ukraine after World War II. The book illustrates how this city, which is at the center of current Russia-Ukraine tensions, emerged from the war more clearly identified with Russia than the Soviet Union or Ukraine. He is now publishing on child refugees from the Spanish Civil War who were raised in the Soviet Union. He received his B.A. in history and Russian area studies from the University of Missouri at Columbia and his Ph.D. in Russian and East European History from Georgetown University.

Video of the Lecture

 

 

Ukraine Update – NEW DATE – MAY 1

Ukraine UpdateNew Date:
Thursday, May 1, 2014
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium

Noon – 1 p.m.

** Bring your Lunch **

Panel Discussion

Participants:

Kristine Mitchell, assistant professor political science and international studies
Anthony Williams, visiting professor of security studies, Dickinson College
Andrew Wolff, professor of political science, Dickinson College
Karl Qualls (moderator), associate professor of history, Dickinson College

Following Russia’s annexation of the former Ukrainian province of Crimea, the United States and its European allies have imposed sanctions on Russia, but pro-Russian Ukrainian separatists have responded by occupying government buildings in eastern Ukrainian cities and Russia has demanded that the Ukraine adopt a federal constitutional structure that would grant considerable autonomy to Russian-speaking areas of the country.  The panel will consider the implications of these ongoing developments from the perspective of the Ukrainian government in Kiev, NATO, the European Union, Russia, and United States.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biographies of the Panelists

Kristine Mitchell is assistant professor of political science and international studies at Dickinson College. Her teaching and research interests include European and EU politics, labor politics, and Left parties. She has conducted field research across Western Europe and has held visiting and short-term appointments at the Institute for European Studies at UC Berkeley, the Center for European Studies at New York University, the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) in Paris, and the Department of Political Science at Northwestern University.

Anthony Williams is a retired CIA senior intelligence officer with a wide range of experience performing an array of domestic and foreign assignments in analysis, operations and management for nearly 32 years.  Experience includes deputy chief of the Arms Control Intelligence Staff,  deputy national intelligence officer for Theater Forces,  chief of strategic planning for Overhead Imagery,  chief of the Russian Affairs Division, chief of the Counterproliferation Interdiction Group, deputy assistant director of Central Intelligence for Collection and executive assistant to the director of Central Intelligence (DCI). Williams held several senior policy-making positions in the national security arena including deputy assistant secretary of defense for Eurasian Policy and congressional fellow in the offices of Senator Sam Nunn and Congressman Edward Markey.  Williams is currently a visiting professor of security studies at Dickinson College and a distinguished fellow of the U.S. Army War College.

Andrew Wolff is an assistant professor of political science, international studies, and security studies at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He received his doctorate in international relations from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in 2010. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in politics and European history from Washington and Lee University and a master’s degree in European studies from Johns Hopkins University SAIS. Prior to his graduate work, he worked as a legal staff assistant in the United States Senate and as an English teacher in Prague, Czech Republic. His primary research interests are geopolitical theory, NATO security issues, transatlantic relations, U.S. foreign policy, and international diplomacy. His most recent publication is “Crafting a NATO Brand: Bolstering Internal Support for the Alliance through Image Management” (Contemporary Security Policy April 2014).

Karl Qualls (moderator) is associate professor of history at Dickinson College and specializes in Russian history. His first book, From Ruins to Reconstruction, details the rebuilding of Sevastopol, Ukraine after World War II. The book illustrates how this city, which is at the center of current Russia-Ukraine tensions, emerged from the war more clearly identified with Russia than the Soviet Union or Ukraine. He received his B.A. in history and Russian area studies from the University of Missouri at Columbia and his Ph.D. in Russian and East European History from Georgetown University.

Video of Panel Discussion

 

 

Should Pennsylvania Legalize Marijuana?

Marijuana posterWednesday, April 23, 2014
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Participants:

Marc Mastrangelo, professor of classical languages, Dickinson College
Crispin Sartwell, associate professor of philosophy, Dickinson College
William Nelligan, class of 2014
Willa Hut, class of 2017
Alex Toole ’14 (moderator), class of 2014

Crispin Sartwell, associate professor of philosophy, and Willa Hut ’17, will argue in favor of the motion, while Marc Mastrangelo, professor of classical studies, and Will Nelligan ’14 will argue in opposition.  The debate will focus in part on the consequences of legalizing marijuana, both positive and negative, as well as how the question relates to the rights and duties of a human being.

This event is the first in a new series titled Dickinson Debates sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Student Senate Public Affairs Committee.

Biographies (provided by the participants)

Marc Mastrangelo is a professor of classical studies and has taught  at Dickinson for 17 years. He has published books and articles on the literature of the later Roman Empire, Greek tragedy, and ancient intellectual history. He is cofounder of the Humanities Collective and faculty advisor to the Quads Neighborhood.

Crispin Sartwell is an associate professor of philosophy at Dickinson College. He’s the author of a number of books, including Obscenity, Anarchy, Reality and Political Aesthetics. His essays have appeared in many places, including Harper’s, The New York Times, and the Times Literary Supplement.

William Nelligan ’14 is Dickinson’s student senate president. He is a double-major in political science and history, focusing on the history of higher education, urban America, and the civil rights movement. A resident of Portland, Maine, Nelligan is Dickinson’s inaugural Public Service Fellow, the chair of the majors committees in history and political science, and research assistant to Prof. Matthew Pinsker and the House Divided Project.

Willa Hut ’17 is from South Orange, New Jersey. She is currently a first-year at Dickinson College. She has not yet declared her major but is interested in studio art and English. On campus, she is a member of the Outing Club.

Alex Toole ’14 is the student project supervisor at the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues. He is a double-major in political science and French, and also serves as Dickinson’s Student Senate Vice President for Finance. Toole is a member of Dickinson’s all-male a cappella group, and after graduating he will join the Baltimore City School District as an elementary school teacher.

DICKINSON DEBATES

Dickinson Debates is a new series of debates co-sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Student Senate Public Affairs Committee.  In this series, Dickinson professors and students will debate significant and timely issues that are of interest to the Dickinson community.  If you have an issue that you think should be debated as part of this series, please email your idea to the Clarke Forum at clarke@dickinson.edu.

 Video of the Debate

 

Revisiting the Cold War: CIA Analysis and Collection

Coldwar Poster2inddPanel I:

Resolving the Missile Gap

Monday, April 21, 2014
Althouse Hall, Room 106, 7 p.m.
Dickinson College

Panelists:

John Bird, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)
Richard Immerman, U.S. Army War College
Fred Kaplan, Slate Magazine
Gene Poteat, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)
Moderator: Major General William Burns, U.S. Army (Ret.)

In the 1950s, our nation faced one of the gravest military threats in its history. The Soviet Union had nuclear weapons and boasted they had the means to deliver them. Was the U.S. truly vulnerable to a first strike? Intelligence analysts had few answers and assertions of “Bomber Gaps” and “Missile “Gaps” abounded.  President Eisenhower recognized that aerial reconnaissance of the Soviet Union was the answer. The story of the U-2 and Corona satellites is now history, but the success of those programs and their follow-on versions is the stuff of today’s high-tech intelligence and warfare.

Link to more information on the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center Site

Panel II:

CIA Analysis of the Warsaw Pact: The Importance of Clandestine Reporting

Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Army Heritage and Education Center, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m.
(950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle PA)

Panelists:

John and Joan Bird, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)
R. Craig Nation, Dickinson College and U.S. Army War College
Frank Jones, U.S. Army War College
Moderator: Dr. David Robarge, Central Intelligence Agency Historian

 

Panel III:

The Men (Popov, Penkovskiy, Kuklinski)

Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Army Heritage and Education Center, 1 – 3 p.m.
(950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle PA)

Panelists:

Hayden Peake, Central Intelligence Agency Historian
Lou Mehrer, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)
Jerrold Schecter, author
David Forden, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)
Moderator: John Bird, Central Intelligence Agency (Ret.)

Revisiting the Cold War: CIA Analysis and Collection

The job of intelligence is to reduce uncertainty. In the 1950s, our nation faced uncertainty, and one of the gravest military threats in its history. The Soviet Union had an enormous advantage in conventional arms and forces. They also possessed nuclear weapons and boasted they had the means to deliver them. Would the Soviets invade Western Europe? Was the U.S. truly vulnerable to a first strike? Intelligence analysts had few answers and assertions of “Bomber Gaps” and “Missile “Gaps” abounded. Clandestine human sources, the U-2 aircraft and Corona satellites, and the analysis that those collection efforts enabled, gave President Eisenhower and his successors far greater clarity and decision advantage. The efforts are now history, but their success – and those of follow-on programs, is the stuff of today’s high-tech intelligence and warfare. The purpose of this forum is to look back at those early efforts, partly in light of current events, to understand their role in our politics and policies of the last half-century.
The forum is centered on recent publication of two volumes by the CIA’s Historical Collections: Penetrating the Iron Curtain: Resolving the Missile Gap and CIA Analysis of the Warsaw Pact Forces: The Importance of Clandestine Reporting. The authors and editors, John and Joan Bird will present and discuss the publications along with selected historians, authors, and scholars in a series of three panels.

This series is sponsored by the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, the Central Intelligence Agency Historical Collection Division, and the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College.

Panel I Participants’ Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Joan Bird, one of the co-authors of this study, had a 29 year career at CIA as a senior analyst of Soviet issues, including Soviet space activities, Soviet policies on space weapons, and arms control of space and defense issues. She is a graduate of West Virginia University and spent three years at the Center for Naval War Studies of Naval War College developing ways to incorporate intelligence, space, communications and information operations in their studies and war games. In addition to 25 years as an analyst, she spent three years as a member of the Defense and Space negotiating team and a year supporting US delegation to the UN Conference on Disarmament on Arms Control for Space. Since retirement in 1997 she has worked with the Naval War College War Games, and for the Army Training and Doctrine Command assessing the information operations play of their Army after Next Series of war games. She is also the co-author of several historical studies for the Historical Collections Division of CIA.

John Bird, one of the authors of this study, had a 32 year career as an analyst of Soviet military issues at CIA. He has a Master of Arts in economics from the University of Washington and is a graduate of the national war college. In Addition to his many assignments within the CIA, he served as a deputy national Intelligence Officer for General Purpose forces, as director of the Strategic Warning Staff and as national intelligence officer of warning. He was chief of the intelligence community’s monitoring authority for all U.S. arms control treaties and agreements. He also served as the intelligence community’s senior intelligence representative to eh conference on disarmament during the negotiations that resulted in the chemical weapons treaty. Since his retirement from CIA in 1994 he has worked with the Naval War College designing and assessing war games, and for the Army Training and Doctrine Command designing and assessing the Army After Next series of war games. In addition he has undertaken projects for the Intelligence Community during the last several years.

Richard H. Immerman is the Edward J. Buthusiem Family Distinguished Faculty Fellow in History at Temple University. He is also holds the Francis W. DeSerio Chair in Theater and Strategic Intelligence Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Dr. Immerman has taught history and political science at the University of Hawaii, Princeton University, University of Colorado, Rutgers University and Boston College. He has authored or co-authored eight books and edited two more. His latest book, The Hidden Hand: A Brief History of the CIA was published this year. Dr. Immerman has also published 39 articles, essays and contributions and numerous book reviews. In 2007, Dr. Immerman was invited by the director of National Intelligence to join his team as the assistant deputy director of national intelligence for Analytic Integrity and Standards, and Analytic Ombudsman and served in that capacity through 2008. He currently chairs the Historical Advisory Committee to the Department of State and holds the Francis W. De Serio Chair in Strategic Intelligence at the Army War College.

Fred Kaplan is the national-security columnist for the online magazine Slate and a senior Schwartz fellow at the New American Foundation. For 20 years, he was a staff reporter for the Boston Globe, writing as the papers military correspondent (1982-91), Moscow bureau chief (1992-95), and New York bureau chief (1995-2002). In 1983, he was a leading member on the team that wrote the Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Sunday magazine on the nuclear arms race.

Kaplan is the author of the prize winning book about the history of nuclear strategy, The Wizards of Armageddon (Simon & Schuster, 1983; reprinted by Stanford University Press 1991). Daydream believers: How a Few Grand Ideas Wrecked American Power (Wiley & Sons, 2008), and 1959: The Year Everything Changed (Wiley & Sons, 2009).

He has written articles about politics, culture, and technology for the New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, Newsweek, The Washington Monthly, Nature, Scientific American, The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, The New York Magazine, Architectural Digest, and other publications.

From 1978-80, Kaplan worked as the national-security adviser to the Representative Les Aspin in the U.S. House of Representatives. He graduated from Oberlin College and has a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Gene Poteat is a retired CIA senior scientific intelligence officer. Educated as an electrical engineer and physicist, he holds master’s degrees in national security and intelligence studies from the Institute of World Politics, a graduate school in Washington, DC, where he also received an honorary doctorate. At that institution he lectures on technology, intelligence, and national security. He began his career with Bell Telephone Laboratories in New Jersey and Cape Canaveral, Florida, as a missile guidance development engineer. His CIA career followed and included work on the U-2, A-12 Oxcart, and various space and naval systems. His CIA assignments included the directorate of science and technology, the National Reconnaissance Office, technical director of the Navy’s Special Programs Office, and executive director of the Intelligence Research and Development Council. He served abroad in London, Scandinavia, and the Middle East. Since 1999 he serves as president of the 5,000-member Association of Former Intelligence Officers (www.afio.com) located in Falls Church, Virginia, where he frequently addresses media inquiries, counsels students considering intelligence careers, and writes on late-breaking intelligence issues for AFIO  publications, and for many other U.S. and foreign publications.

The Honorable William F. Burns was the 9th Director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. He was commissioned in the Field Artillery of the U.S. Army in 1954 and attained the rank of major general before retiring in 1988 to accept President Reagan’s appointment to head the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.

During his military career, General Burns commanded several nuclear delivery field artillery units in Germany in the mid-1970’s. As a general officer, he served as the Joint Chiefs of Staff representative to the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces negotiations in Geneva from 1981 to 1984, and 1985 to 1986.  In 1986, he was seconded to Department of State as principal deputy assistant secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs and military assistant to The Secretary of State.

In 1992, as President Bush’s special envoy to Russia and other states of the former Soviet Union, he negotiated the terms of U.S. assistance to dismantle former Soviet nuclear weapons. Later, he chaired the National Academy of Science’s 1997 study on the future of U.S. nuclear weapons policy, and co-chaired the 2005 study on monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons reduction agreements .

Video of the Panel Discussion on Resolving the Missile Gap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Salzman

Salzman poster_finalProfessor, Duke University

Drinking Water

Tuesday, April 8, 2014     
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

By explaining how drinking water highlights the most pressing issues of our time, from globalization and social justice to terrorism and climate change, and how humans have been wrestling with these problems for centuries, Salzman shows us how complex a simple glass of water can be.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Economics, Chemistry, Mathematics  and Computer Science, Environmental Studies and Environmental Science.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Water.

015612b_lemos0016.cr2Biography (provided by the speaker)

James Salzman holds joint appointments at Duke University as the Samuel Fox Mordecai Professor of Law at the Law School and as the Nicholas Institute Professor of Environmental Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment. In more than eight books and seventy articles and book chapters, his broad-ranging scholarship has addressed topics spanning trade and environment conflicts, drinking water, environmental protection in the service economy, wetlands mitigation banking, and the legal and institutional issues in creating markets for ecosystem services.

A dedicated classroom teacher and colleague, Salzman has twice been voted Professor of the Year by students at Duke’s School of the Environment and received two Blueprint Awards from the Law School for institutional service. He has lectured on environmental policy in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa. He has served as a visiting professor at Yale, Stanford, and Harvard (as the Leo Gottlieb Visiting Professor) as well as at Macquarie (Australia), Lund (Sweden), and Tel Aviv (Israel) Universities and the European University Institute (Italy). He has given distinguished lectures at Florida State, Wyoming, Pace and Lewis & Clark (invited for  2013).

An honors graduate of Yale College and Harvard University, Salzman was the first Harvard graduate to earn joint degrees in law and engineering and was named a Sheldon Fellow upon graduation. He has both government and private sector work experience. Prior to entering academia, he worked in Paris in the Environment Directorate of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and in London as the European Environmental Manager for Johnson Wax. His honors include election as a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, as well as appointments as a McMaster Fellow and Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia and as a Bren Fellow at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara.

He has published four casebooks, including International Environmental Law and Policy, Foundation Press (with D. Zaelke and D. Hunter, 1998, 4th ed. 2010), the leading casebook in the field with adoptions at over 200 schools. His articles have appeared in the Stanford, California, NYU, Penn Law Review and other legal, scientific and popular journals. A national survey of environmental law professors has voted his work among the top articles of the year on six separate occasions. Salzman is active in the fields of practice and policy, serving as a Member of the Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee, a government-appointed body providing counsel to the EPA Administrator and U.S. Trade Representative on trade and environment issues, as well as advising several environmental non-profits.

His most recent book, Drinking Water: A History, was praised as a “Recommended Read” by Scientific American and excerpted in Natural History.

Video of the Lecture

A. Breeze Harper

Breeze Harper PosterResearch Fellow, University of California, Davis

Vegan Food Politics: A Black Feminist Perspective

Thursday, April 3, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Using the analytical lenses of critical whiteness studies and black feminism, this lecture will explore how issues of food, health, and “ethical eating” in American veganism are informed by embodied experiences with race, gender, and legacies of colonialism.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Student Senate and co-sponsored by the Department of American Studies, Women’s and Gender Resource Center, Center for Sustainability Education, Office of Diversity Initiatives and the Departments of Women’s and Gender Studies and Africana Studies.

skinnyjeansandafroBiography  (provided by the speaker)
Dr. A. Breeze Harper is the director and founder of the Sistah Vegan Project. Her emphasis are in the the intersections of critical food studies, critical race studies, and black feminist theorizing. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis and is currently a research fellow in the human ecology department of University of California where she is currently researching key black male vegans who use hip hop and decolonial methodologies for their health, food, and environmental activism. You can follow her work at
www.sistahvegan.com.

Video of the Lecture

 

Tamara Lawson

Lawson PosterProfessor, Saint Thomas University School of Law

Stand Your Ground: Discretion, Race, and Culture

Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Allison Great Hall – 7 p.m.

An engaging conversation about how discretion, which is exercised at all levels of the criminal justice system, can affect the outcomes of criminal cases, including claims of self-defense and the right to stand-your-ground.  The dynamics of the discretionary decisions made by legislatures, prosecutors, judges, and juries, in controversial homicide cases like the Trayvon Martin / George Zimmerman case, the Marissa Alexander case, and the Michael Dunn case, as well as other high profile criminal cases, will be discussed.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Development and the Women’s and Gender Resource Center.

Lawson, T008Biography (provided by the speaker)
Tamara F. Lawson is a tenured professor of law at Saint Thomas University School of Law. She joined the Saint Thomas Law faculty in 2004 where she teaches criminal law,criminal procedure, evidence, and a seminar on race and the law. Professor Lawson has twice been awarded Professor of the Year at St. Thomas. Prior to joining the law faculty, Professor Lawson served as a deputy district attorney at the Clark County District Attorney’s Office in Las Vegas, Nevada, for six years where she prosecuted a wide variety of criminal cases and argued cases on appeal at the Nevada Supreme Court. Professor Lawson has authored multiple law review articles on criminal law, forensic evidence, police brutality, and prosecutorial discretion.  One of her most recent articles is entitled A Fresh Cut in an Old Wound – A Critical Analysis of the Trayvon Martin Killing:  The Public Outcry, the Prosecutors’ Discretion, and The Stand Your Ground Law, published at the University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy in the December 2012 issue. In connection with her research on the Trayvon Martin case Professor Lawson has made local media appearances and selected as the Reporter for the American Bar Association’s National Task Force on Stand Your Ground Laws.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Development.

Video of the Lecture

 

Snowden Reflections

Snowden Panel Final PosterTuesday, March 25, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room – 7 p.m.

The Snowden leaks of classified information over the last several months have highlighted a number of important issues, including the lawfulness of certain surveillance programs of the National Security Agency, the proper balance between national security and privacy/civil liberties, and the impact the leaks have had on U.S. foreign relations and the intelligence community.  This panel discussion will address these issues with a general focus on the impact that the Snowden disclosures have had on the United States and its constitutional framework.

Panelists

Amy Gaudion, assistant dean for Academic Affairs, Penn State Dickinson School of Law
Bert Tussing, director of the Homeland Defense and Security Issues Group, Center for Strategic Leadership and Development, U.S. Army War College
Anthony Williams, visiting professor of security studies, Dickinson College
Harry Pohlman (moderator), A. Lee Fritschler Chair in Public Policy and executive director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Dickinson College

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Amy C. Gaudion is the assistant dean for Academic Affairs, Penn State Dickinson School of Law.  Professor Gaudion’s scholarly and teaching interests focus on national security and constitutional law. She holds appointments in the law school and Penn State’s School of International Affairs, serves as the executive editor of the Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs, and a legal advisor to the World on Trial public television/multimedia.  Prior to joining Penn State she was an associate with Hangley Aronchick Segal & Pudlin, and a clerk for The Hon. William H. Yohn of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Bert Tussing is the director of the Homeland Defense and Security Issues Group at the U.S. Army War College’s Center for Strategic Leadership and Development.  He joined the Center in October 1999 following nearly 25 years in the United States Marine Corps. He is a Distinguished Graduate of both the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the Naval War College, and holds master’s degrees in national security strategy and military strategic studies. He has served on three Defense Science Boards; the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Beyond  Goldwater-Nichols Study; and on the Senior Advisory Group for DoD’s Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support He is a senior fellow on George Washington University’s Homeland Security Policy Institute and Long Island University’s Homeland Security Management Institute; a member of the board of experts for the University of California-Irvines’ Center for Unconventional Security Affairs; a member of the Pennsylvania State University’s Homeland Defense and Security Council; and on the Homeland Security Board of Advisors for Kansas State University and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. In 2009 he served on Department of Homeland Security’s Homeland Security Advisory Council, assisting in the development of the Department’s first Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, and in 2013 served on an advisory council for the Secretary of Homeland Security.  

Anthony Williams is a retired CIA senior intelligence officer with a wide range of experience performing an array of domestic and foreign assignments in analysis, operations and management for nearly 32 years.  Experience includes deputy chief of the Arms Control Intelligence Staff,  deputy national intelligence officer for Theater Forces,  chief of strategic planning for Overhead Imagery,  chief of the Russian Affairs Division, chief of the Counterproliferation Interdiction Group, deputy assistant director of Central Intelligence for Collection and executive assistant to the director of Central Intelligence (DCI). Williams held several senior policy-making positions in the national security arena including deputy assistant secretary of defense for Eurasian Policy and congressional fellow in the offices of Senator Sam Nunn and Congressman Edward Markey.  Williams is currently a visiting professor of security studies at Dickinson College and a distinguished fellow of the U.S. Army War College.

Harry Pohlman holds the A. Lee Fritschler Chair in Public Policy and is currently the executive director of The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College. His areas of research specialization include American constitutional law and political and legal thought. His recent publications include an undergraduate constitutional law textbook, Terrorism and the Constitution: The Post-9/11 Cases (2008). His book May It Amuse the Court: Editorial Cartoons of the Supreme Court and Constitution (with Michael A. Kahn) was published by Hill Street Press in 2005. He has also published three recent volumes in the second revised edition of Rowman and Littlefield’s Constitutional Debate in Action series: Civil Rights and Liberties (2005), Criminal Justice (2005), and Governmental Powers (2004).

 Video of the Panel Discussion

 

Laura Suchoski

Suchoski Poster FinalSocial Media Manager, McKinney

Sports, Social Media & the Empowerment of Women

Monday, March 24, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

The ever-growing landscape of social media is changing how we, as fans and athletes, consume sports.  Laura Suchoski, a former social media manager at ESPN, will be exploring social innovations in sports media and how businesses are using them to engage diverse audiences with a focus on women.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Department of Athletics.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

lsuchoski_kLaura Suchoski is a social media and creative marketing professional, currently social media manager at the advertising agency McKinney in North Carolina.  Prior to joining McKinney in 2014, Laura managed social media for four years at ESPN and espnW, the company’s business dedicated to female fans and athletes.  Growing up with three competitive siblings and parents who drove her to far-away clinics and tournaments, Laura developed a passion for sports and being a part of a team.  She became the first four-time field hockey All-American at Duke University, a two-time captain, All-Academic honoree, and Athlete of the Decade.  Laura competed with the U.S. Field Hockey National Team program for seven years, before choosing to pursue a career that she loves in creative marketing.  Laura is originally from northeast Pennsylvania and graduated from Duke University with a B.A. in sociology and a certificate in policy journalism and media studies.

Video of the Lecture

Howard Winant

Winant Poster FinalProfessor, University of California, Santa Barbara

The Dark Matter: Race and Racism

Thursday, March 20, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Race and racism are in many ways the building blocks of the contemporary world and the social universe we take for granted.  The unfreedom, despotism, exclusion, inequality, and violence that are associated with the absolutist regimes from which contemporary society has evolved lives on in the profound presence of race and racism: the “dark matter” of our lives today.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Spanish & Portuguese, Sociology, and Middle East Studies.

HW2010Biography (provided by the speaker)

Howard Winant is a professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he is also affiliated with the Black Studies and Chicana/o Studies departments.  He chaired the UCSB Law and Society program during the 2009-2010 academic year.  He received his Ph.D from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1980.  He has worked and taught in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.

Winant is the founding director of the UC Center for New Racial Studies (UCCNRS), a MultiCampus Research Program active on all ten UC campuses. He is the author of The New Politics of Race: Globalism, Difference, Justice (University of Minnesota Press 2004); The World is a Ghetto: Race and Democracy Since World War II (Basic Books 2001); Racial Conditions: Politics, Theory, Comparisons (University of Minnesota Press 1994); Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s (co-authored with Michael Omi – Routledge 1986 and 1994); and Stalemate: Political Economic Origins of Supply-side Policy (Praeger 1988).

Video of the Lecture

 

Ukraine?

Ukraine Final Poster - Resch**  Breaking Issue **

Thursday, March 6, 2014
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium – 7 p.m.

As the Sochi Olympics were drawing to a close, the long simmering tug-of-war between the EU and Russia over the future of Ukraine boiled over into street violence and political chaos in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital. This panel will examine the origins of this crisis, the interests at stake for Russia, the EU, and the US, and the possible outcomes and consequences for international relations and for Ukraine itself.

Panelists

R. Craig Nation – Visiting Professor of Political Science & Security Studies, Dickinson College;  and Professor of Eurasian Studies at the U.S. Army War College
Karl Qualls
– Associate Professor of History, Dickinson College
Marybeth Ulrich
– Professor of Government, Department of National Security and Strategy, U.S. Army War College
Russell Bova (moderator)
– Professor of Political Science, Dickinson College

Biographies (provided by the panelists)Nation 1

R. Craig Nation has been professor of strategy and director of Eurasian studies at the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania since 1996. He also serves as a visiting professor of security studies at Dickinson College. Professor Nation specializes in the foreign policy and security affairs of the Europan and Eurasian regions. He received is bachelor’s in history and political science from Villanova University and his Ph.D. in Russian and contemporary European history from Duke University.

QuallsKarl Qualls is associate professor of history at Dickinson College and specializes in Russian history. His first book, From Ruins to Reconstruction, details the rebuilding of Sevastopol, Ukraine after World War II. The book illustrates how this city, which is at the center of current Russia-Ukraine tensions, emerged from the war more clearly identified with Russia than the Soviet Union or Ukraine. He received his B.A. in history and Russian area studies from the University of Missouri at Columbia and his Ph.D. in Russian and East European History from Georgetown University.

Marybeth Peterson Ulrich is the professor of government in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War Ulrich PhotoCollege. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Illinois and a B.S  from the U.S. Air Force Academy where she was a Distinguished Graduate in the Class of 1984.  Her research interests are focused on strategic studies with a special emphasis on civil-military relations, European security, and national security democratization issues. Among Dr. Ulrich’s many publications is a book, Democratizing Communist Militaries: The Cases of the Czech and Russian Armed Forces. A colonel in the Air Force Reserve, she currently serves as the reserve air attaché to the Russian Federation.

bova_8785Russell Bova is professor of political science and teaches a variety of courses on international relations and comparative politics. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on Russian politics and comparative democratization. His international relations textbook, How the World Works, and an accompanying book of readings, Readings on How the World Works, were published in 2009. He received his B.A. from  State University of New York at Buffalo and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Indiana University.

Video of the Panel Discussion