Arab Uprisings

The startling wave of popular protest movements in the Arab world caught the world by surprise and continues to evolve in unpredictable ways. Demonstrators swept leaders from power in Tunisia and Egypt, and a popular rebellion overthrew the Libyan government. The regimes in Yemen, Syria and Bahrain have held on so far, but the social groups opposed to them have not been defeated either. Governments and institutions across the region are facing unprecedented pressures from newly empowered citizens to reform themselves. The Clarke Forum has organized a number of events to share the expertise and perspective of Dickinson faculty and other experts with the campus and local communities.

Arab Spring

Tuesday, November 15, 2011
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Protest movements continue to spread in the Arab world, taking different shape according to local political structures and social dynamics and posing knotty challenges to U.S. policymakers to keep up with the breakneck speed of developments.

Panelists

P.J. Crowley – Omar N. Bradley Joint Chair in Strategic Leadership
Ed Webb -Professor of political science and international studies, Dickinson College
Sherifa Zuhur – Director of the Institute of Middle Eastern, Islamic, and Strategic Studies
David Commins (moderator) – Professor of history and Middle East studies, Dickinson College

Biographies
David Commins is a professor of history and the Benjamin Rush Distinguished Chair in Liberal Arts and Sciences at Dickinson College. He teaches courses in the Middle East studies program and the history department. His publications include Islamic Reform: Politics and Social Change in Late Ottoman Syria (Oxford University Press, 1990), Historical Dictionary of Syria (Scarecrow Press, 1995, revised edition 2004), and The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (IB Tauris, 2006).

P.J Crowley, former United States assistant Secretary of State for public affairs, is the 2011-2012 recipient of the General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership. While in residence, Crowley conducts classes at Dickinson College, the U.S. Army War College and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs.

President Barack Obama nominated Crowley to be assistant secretary of state for public affairs in 2009. Crowley had served as senior director of public affairs for the National Security Council during the Clinton Administration. He was a 26-year veteran of the United States Air Force and served in Turkey, Germany, and at the U.S. Air Force Academy. During the Kosovo conflict, he worked under Javier Solana, secretary general of NATO, helping to develop a strategic communication capability to build public support for the NATO campaign. He retired from the Air Force in 1999 as a colonel.

Ed Webb is assistant professor of Political Science and International Studies. He also contributes to Middle East Studies and Security Studies. Formerly a member of Britain’s Diplomatic Service, including serving at the British Embassy in Cairo in the 1990′s, he has a B.A. from Cambridge University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His teaching and research interests in the Middle East include secularism, education, authoritarianism, and media, including digital and social media. He is a member of the National Advisory Board of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education.

Sherifa Zuhur is the director of the Institute of Middle Eastern, Islamic and Strategic Studies. She was research professor of Islamic and Regional Studies at the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College from 2004-2009. She has held faculty and research positions at MIT, the University of California, Berkeley, the American University in Cairo,UCLA, and Cleveland State University and was President of the Association of Middle East Women¹s Studies. She has published seventeen books and monographs, and more than one hundred and fifty articles or chapters in edited books, most recently Saudi Arabia (ABC-Clio) scheduled for early fall 2011 publication.
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Bernardino León Gross

E.U. Special Representative (EUSR) for the Southern Mediterranean

Arab Spring: A European Perspective

Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Stern Center, Great Room – 12:30 p.m.

Protest movements and uprisings continue to spread in the Arab world, taking different shape according to local political structures and social dynamics. The trend poses knotty challenges to European Union policy makers as they try to keep up with the breakneck speed of developments.

This event is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Bernardino Leon is the European Union Special Representative (EUSR) for the Southern Mediterranean.

He was born in Malaga, where he obtained a degree in Law focusing his studies in public international law. He got a diploma in international studies from the CEI, University of Barcelona. He became a Spanish diplomat in 1989. He was first posted to Liberia in 1990-1991, where the devastating civil war focused his professional interest in understanding the underpinning causes of ethnic violence.

Since then, his political and diplomatic career has been mainly devoted to the Arab world. In 1991, he was part of a short mission to Libya in the context of establishing the international embargo against that country. From 1992-1995, he was posted to Algeria where he lived the process after the elections, de coup d’etat and the subsequent violence. He was then posted to Greece, where he followed the end of the conflict in Bosnia and the Balkans region and the negotiations and implementation of the Dayton Agreement. During this period he traveled frequently to Turkey and followed its political and social evolution very closely.
In 1998, at the outset of the CFSP, he became personal adviser to the EU Special Representative for the Middle East Peace Process, Miguel Angel Moratinos, at the time when the Wye Accords were being negotiated. He remained until 2001, during the Taba Accords negotiations (which were contained in the “Morations Document”) and the set up of the Quartet on the Middle East. His mission was primarily focused in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Israel and Palestine.

In 2001, he became head of the Three Cultures of the Mediterranean Foundation, which is a Moroccan-Spanish institution for dialogue and mutual understanding among the different cultures and religions in the Mediterranean. During this period, he worked very closely with governments and civil society representatives. That was the case of Tunisia, for instance, where he worked with members of the opposition.
In 2003, Edward Said, Daniel Barenboim and Bernardino Leon, founded the Barenboim-Said Foundation, which focused on the West Eastern Divan orchestra for young musicians from the Arab countries of the Middle East and Israel.

From 2004-2008, he became secretary of state for foreign affairs at the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation. He is particularly proud of having helped launch the Alliance of Civilisations, which is an initiative proposed by PM of Spain, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, at the 59th General Assembly of the United Nations (UN) in 2005. It was co-sponsored by the Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. The initiative seeks to galvanize international action against extremism through the forging of international, intercultural and interreligious dialogue and cooperation. The Alliance places a particular emphasis on defusing tensions between the Western and Islamic worlds. During this period, he worked very closely with Arab countries and was particularly involved in the negotiations between Cyprus and Turkey.

In 2008 he was appointed secretary general at the Spanish Prime Minister’s Office, which involves, among other responsibilities, the role as the main foreign policy advisor to the Prime Minister of Spain.

In 2009 he was appointed, keeping his post as Secretary General of the Presidency, Sherpa for the G20, a forum in which he participated in all the negotiations and summits to date, which has involved holding a very active role in major international economic and financial issues.

He has published and translated several books and articles on the Arab Muslim world and its relationship with the West, and has given numerous lectures on these issues. He maintained a close relationship with the great intellectual and fighter for democracy in the Arab world Edward Said. His son, Wadie, wrote in the Spanish edition of the book Covering Islam, “My father’s memory is honoured in the introduction to this Spanish edition written by Bernardino León. Although many politicians sought the advice of my father throughout his life, almost always were too shy to take heed of it despite agreeing with the analysis. Bernardino León is one of those rare politicians who have recognized the impact of my father’s work both in word and deed, and has never suffered from the weakness that affects other politicians.”

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Uprisings and Interventions in the Arab World

** BREAKING ISSUE **

Thursday, April 7, 2011
Denny Hall, Room 317 – 7:00 p.m.

Panelists

Larry Goodson – professor of Middle East studies, U.S. Army War College
W. Andrew Terrill – professor of national security affairs, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
David Commins – professor of history and Middle East Studies, Dickinson College

Protest movements continue to spread in the Arab world, taking different shape according to local political structures and social dynamics and posing knotty challenges to US policymakers to keep up with the breakneck speed of developments.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)
Larry P. Goodson is professor of Middle East Studies at the U.S. Army War College. He is regularly consulted by senior government officials about Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Middle East. In 2008-2009 he served on a four-month temporary assignment with the U.S. Central Command Assessment Team, where he focused on U.S. strategy and policy toward Afghanistan and Pakistan for General David Petraeus. As U.S. Central Command Fellow in 2004, he served as a senior adviser to General John Abizaid on Afghanistan and Pakistan. Prof. Goodson held the General Dwight D. Eisenhower Chair of National Security at the U.S. Army War College from 2004 to 2007. In 2002, Prof. Goodson was technical adviser on Elections and one of the International Election Monitors for the Emergency Loya Jirga in Afghanistan.

W. Andrew Terrill joined the Strategic Studies Institute in October 2001, and is SSI’s Middle East specialist. Prior to his appointment, he served as a Middle East nonproliferation analyst for the International Assessments Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In 1998-99, Dr. Terrill also served as a Visiting Professor at the U.S. Air War College on assignment from LLNL. He is a former faculty member at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, and has taught adjunct at a variety of other colleges and universities. He is a retired U.S. Army Reserve Lieutenant Colonel and Foreign Area Officer (Middle East). Dr. Terrill has published in numerous academic journals on topics including nuclear proliferation, the Iran-Iraq War, Operation DESERT STORM, Middle Eastern chemical weapons, and ballistic missile proliferation, terrorism, and commando operations. He is also the author of Global Security Watch – Jordan (Praeger 2010). Since 1994, at U.S. State Department invitation, Dr. Terrill has participated in the Middle Eastern Track 2 talks, which are part of the Middle East Peace Process. He has also served as a member of the military and security working group of the Baker/Hamilton Iraq Study Group throughout its existence in 2006. Dr. Terrill holds a B.A. from California State Polytechnic University and an M.A. from the University of California, Riverside, both in Political Science. He also holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California.

David Commins is professor of history and the Benjamin Rush Distinguished Chair in Liberal Arts and Sciences at Dickinson College. He teaches courses in the Middle East Studies program and the history department. His publications include Islamic Reform: Politics and Social Change in Late Ottoman Syria (Oxford University Press, 1990), Historical Dictionary of Syria (Scarecrow Press, 1995, revised edition 2004), and The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (IB Tauris, 2006).