Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty

The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues is establishing a series of programmatic events dedicated to the theme of leadership in an age of uncertainty. This initiative is grounded on the reality that today’s generation of Dickinson students confronts a large number of intractable political, economic, and social problems: terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental pollution, global warming, a sustainable energy policy, the ongoing financial crisis, the federal deficit, the amount of public and private debt, the health care crisis, along with issues regarding race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as technology and privacy. These issues and problems directly or indirectly pose challenges to the College and the local community that may in time require fundamental changes in institutions, values, and practices across the public, private, and non-profit sectors of American society. How Dickinsonians respond to these challenges presents us with an opportunity for reflection on the meaning of leadership in the contemporary world. This series is partially supported by a fund created by Betty R. ’58 and Dan Churchill.

David McCormick

Bridgewater Associates

* We are conducting this event virtually. It was previously postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

How Mentors Can Shape Your Future: A Conversation with a Global Leader

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 – 7 p.m.
Live Stream Event

Dickinson College President Margee Ensign and U.S. District Judge John E. Jones will converse with Bridgewater Associates CEO David McCormick (Bridgewater Associates manages approximately $160 billion in global investments). They will discuss the importance of mentorship and the role mentors can play in developing leadership skills.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Office of the President.  It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies

David McCormick is the CEO of the global investment firm Bridgewater Associates, responsible for overseeing the firm’s strategy, governance, and business operations. McCormick joined Bridgewater in 2009 and previously served as the firm’s president, before becoming Co-CEO in 2017 and the CEO in 2020.

Before joining Bridgewater, McCormick was the U.S. Treasury Under Secretary for International Affairs in the George W. Bush Administration during the global financial crisis. Prior to that, he served in senior posts on the National Security Council and in the Department of Commerce. From 1999-2005 McCormick was a technology entrepreneur, serving as CEO and then president of two publicly-traded software companies, FreeMarkets, Inc. and Ariba, Inc.

Earlier in his career McCormick was a consultant at McKinsey & Company. He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and has a Ph.D. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is a former Army officer and a veteran of the First Gulf War.

McCormick serves as a trustee on several boards including the United Service Organizations (USO) and The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). He also serves as the chairman of the Atlantic Council’s International Advisory Board.

Margee Ensign is the 29th president of Dickinson College, which was chartered in 1783—the first college established in the new United States of America. Dickinson is a recognized leader in global education and the first college to receive the Senator Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization twice. Under Ensign’s leadership, Dickinson has expanded its ties with the U.S. Army War College to include graduate courses, and has established a Bridge Program for women whose education has been interrupted by conflict. Ensign is also a long-time vocal advocate for the need for deep international learning. For seven years, she was the president of the American University of Nigeria where she also led the Adamawa Peace Initiative (API), a peace initiative composed of religious and community leaders which successfully promoted peace and countered Boko Haram through education, humanitarian assistance for 300,000 refugees and youth empowerment.

Ensign is a well-respected scholar on development, on Africa, and—growing out of her experience in Rwanda—on genocide. She is a well-respected scholar on development, Africa, and genocide, and is the author of seven books, including  Rwanda: History and Hope and co-editor of Confronting Genocide: Dehumanization, Denial and Strategies for Prevention. She co-edited a recent Peace Review special issue on Religion in War and Peace in Africa and most recently co-authored the forthcoming book Transactional Radio Instruction:  Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Conflict Zones. She has presented at the World Economic Forum, been interviewed multiple times by the BBC and CNN, written for The Washington Post, and has testified before Congress on global education, international affairs and foreign assistance.

United States District Judge John E. Jones III is a 1977 graduate of Dickinson College, and a 1980 graduate of the Penn State Dickinson School of Law. He engaged in the private practice of law and served in the administration of former Pennsylvania Governor and U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge before being appointed by former President George W. Bush to the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania in 2002. Judge Jones is the recipient of honorary degrees from both Dickinson and Muhlenberg Colleges, and in 2005 he was named as one of Time Magazine’s Time 100, the annual ranking of the most influential people in the world for the preceding year.

Judge Jones has presided over a number of noteworthy and high profile cases. In 2003 Judge Jones struck down portions of Shippensburg University’s speech code on the basis that they violated the First Amendment’s free speech guarantee. In that same year he ruled, in a decision later affirmed by the United States Supreme Court, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s statute assessing milk producers in order to fund advertising, including the Milk Mustache/got milk® campaign did not infringe the free speech rights of the producers. In 2005 Judge Jones presided over the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover School District, after which he held that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum. In 2006 he ruled that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s ballot access procedures for minor political parties did not violate the Constitution. In 2014 John resolved the matter of Whitewood v. Wolf by striking down as unconstitutional Pennsylvania’s ban on same-sex marriage.

Judge Jones has appeared as a guest on national television shows and networks such as Today on NBC, the NewsHour on PBS, C-SPAN’s America & The Courts, CNN, Al Jazeera America, and locally on the Pennsylvania Cable Network.

Video of the Presentation

Marie Fortune – “Wesley Lecturer” (Event Postponed *)

FaithTrust Institute

* The event is postponed due to the college’s response to COVID-19.

Wesley Lecture

Wolves in Shepherds’ Clothing

Tuesday, March 31, 2020
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

The problem of misconduct by faith leaders causing harm to congregants and congregations stretches across faith communities.  Finally the extent of this reality is being revealed by the courageous voices of survivors.  Our faith communities now face the challenge of responding with justice and compassion.

This lecture is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Center for Spirituality and Social Justice with special thanks to the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, Community Studies, and the Program in Policy Studies. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Rev. Dr. Marie M. Fortune is a renowned author, lecturer, ethicist, theologian, and a pioneer in the movement to end domestic and sexual violence. Fortune founded the Center for the Prevention of Sexual and Domestic Violence, now known as FaithTrust Institute, in 1977.

In 1983, Fortune was the first theologian who wrote on the relationship between sexual violence and religion with her book, Sexual Violence: The Unmentionable Sin. It was revised with the 2005 release of Sexual Violence – The Sin Revisited. She was one of the first persons to call religious communities to accountability on the issue of sexual abuse by clergy. Her commitment has been to provide the spiritual, intellectual and practical resources to those who encounter victims, survivors and perpetrators of interpersonal violence. Her subsequent efforts have changed the way religious leaders and institutions respond to sexual and domestic violence.

She has authored several books on sexual ethics, sexual and domestic violence, and abuse by religious leaders. She also provided a forum for critical and in-depth discussions on religion and abuse with the founding of the Journal of Religion and Abuse, where she served as editor.

Fortune has received many honors and awards for her work, including Alumni Award of Distinction, Yale Divinity School, New Haven, CT; Social Prophet Award from the United Church of Christ and the 2018 Ed Gondolf COMPASS Award, Battering Intervention Services Coalition of Michigan; as well as Honorary Doctorates from Starr King School for the Ministry, Berkeley, CA, and Eden Theological Seminary, St. Louis, MO.

“No one has done more to name and change the attitude and culture of the church about sexual and domestic violence than Marie Fortune. She has spoken out when it was difficult and given leadership where it is needed.”
– Rev. Dr. David Greenhaw, President of Eden Theological Seminary, 2014

The Wesley Lecture
The Wesley Lecture grows out of the historical relationship between Dickinson College and the Methodist Church, a relationship that has its roots in the 19th century. The lecture highlights contemporary conversations and controversies in faith communities and in higher education about the importance and role of community, commitment, and service for the education of the citizen-scholar.

Ibram X. Kendi (Event Postponed *)

National Book Award-winning historian and author of Stamped From The Beginning

* The event is postponed due to the college’s response to COVID-19.

How to Be an Antiracist

Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium
(Rescheduled from 2/6/20)

When America’s first black president entered the White House, Americans described their nation as “color-blind” and the era as “post-racial.” That was a short-lived illusion. In this deeply personal and empowering lecture, National Book Award-winning Historian and Author Ibram X. Kendi shifts the discussion from how not to be racist to how to be an antiracist. He shares his own racist ideas and how he overcame them, and provides direction to those who want not just Band-Aid programs but actual antiracist action that builds an antiracist America. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State’s Dickinson Law and co-sponsored by the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, the Office of the Provost, the First Year Seminar Program, and Center for Spirituality & Social Justice, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity, and the departments of English, political science, sociology, and American studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

D18_185_Ibram_Kendi nfs

Ibram X. Kendi is professor of history and international relations and the founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. He is a frequent public speaker who speaks with great expertise and compassion about the findings of his book and how they can fit into the national conversation on racial and social justice.

Kendi has received research fellowships, grants, and visiting appointments from a variety of universities, foundations, professional associations, and libraries, including the American Historical Association, Library of Congress, National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Lyndon B. Johnson Library & Museum, Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Brown University, Princeton University, Duke University, University of Chicago, and UCLA. Most recently, he was named a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow for his work.

In addition to winning the National Book Award, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas was also named a finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction and nominated for the 2016 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Nonfiction. The book was featured on many Best Books of 2016 lists, including in the Boston GlobeKirkusThe Washington PostThe RootChicago Review of Books, and Buzzfeed.

Kendi has published numerous academic essays as well as op-eds in publications such as The New York TimesThe Washington Post, Time, The Guardianand The Chronicle of Higher Education. He is also the author of the award-winning book, The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972. In 2018, he was named a columnist for a new vertical of The Atlantic focusing on ideas, opinion, and political and cultural commentary.

Rick Doblin ‘P21

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

Psychedelics: Science, Medicine and Politics

Monday, February 24, 2020
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

This lecture will discuss the politics of psychedelic research from the 1960s to today. Doblin will explore the history of MDMA, mechanisms of actions of psychedelics, and efforts to medicalize psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, depression and other indications.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of philosophy and psychology, the anthropology club, the neuroscience club, the Health Studies Program and the Program in Policy Studies.  This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum student project managers and is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speakers)

Rick Doblin, Ph.D., is the founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). He received his doctorate in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, where he wrote his dissertation on the regulation of the medical uses of psychedelics and marijuana and his master’s thesis on a survey of oncologists about smoked marijuana vs. the oral THC pill in nausea control for cancer patients. His undergraduate thesis at New College of Florida was a 25-year follow-up to the classic Good Friday Experiment, which evaluated the potential of psychedelic drugs to catalyze religious experiences. He also conducted a thirty-four year follow-up study to Timothy Leary’s Concord Prison Experiment. Rick studied with Dr. Stanislav Grof and was among the first to be certified as a Holotropic Breathwork practitioner. His professional goal is to help develop legal contexts for the beneficial uses of psychedelics and marijuana, primarily as prescription medicines but also for personal growth for otherwise healthy people, and eventually to become a legally licensed psychedelic therapist. He founded MAPS in 1986, and currently resides in Boston with his wife, dog, and empty rooms from three children, one of whom is in college and two have graduated.

Related Links

Rick Doblin’s Ted Talk –  https://www.ted.com/talks/rick_doblin_the_future_of_psychedelic_assisted_psychotherapy?language=en

Fox news 6 minute clip – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVs-urb-6W0

Movie called Trip of Compassion: https://vimeo.com/198560028 Password: trip

Short Documentary – Ecstatic states: treating PTSD with MDMA – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNxuRs6tTuw

Short video interview with SGT Jon Lubecky – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K5sJuTbQvY

Scientific papers:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30245101
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=mdma+mice+dolen
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31572236
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31065731
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30890035
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30529341

More:

https://maps.org/research/mdma

Video of the Lecture

Bill Durden ’71

International University Alliance (IUA)

An Anticipatory Memoir: Aging on the Diagonal

Tuesday, February 18, 2020
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Advanced age – or what is commonly called “The Third Chapter” – arguably remains without operative definition, although so many citizens globally are entering that phase of life. Based upon personal reflection, a definition is proposed for debate – a definition that could lead to a “Good Life.”

The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and is part of our The Good Life series. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

William G. Durden is President Emeritus of Dickinson College, where he served for 14 years (1999-2013). During his tenure at Dickinson he was both a professor of German and a professor of Education. He is currently president of the International University Alliance (IUA), a non-profit association of top-tier U.S. research universities committed to international education (sponsored by Shorelight), chief global engagement officer at Shorelight, a courtesy professor (research) in the School of Education, Johns Hopkins University and an operating partner of Sterling Partners, a diversified investment management platform founded in 1983 and based in Chicago with branch offices in Baltimore and Miami.

Durden received his undergraduate degree from Dickinson College (1971) in German and philosophy and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in German language and literature from Johns Hopkins University. Directly following graduation from Dickinson, he was a Fulbright-Hays Scholar at the University of Basle, Switzerland. He has also studied at the University of Freiburg and the University of Muenster, Germany. He was a Klingenstein Fellow at Columbia University and American Council of Learned Societies’ Fellow in Wolfenbuettel, Germany. He served as an officer in the U.S. Army, Military Intelligence Branch and most recently chaired the Middle States accreditation process for the United States Military Academy (West Point).

Directly prior to his 14-year tenure at Dickinson College, Durden was simultaneously president of a division of the Sylvan Learning Systems, Inc. (today Laureate Education, Inc.) and vice president of academic affairs for the Caliber Learning Network—a joint venture of MCI and Sylvan. Prior to Sylvan, Durden was a member of the German department at the Johns Hopkins University and founding executive director of the Center for Talented Youth (CTY) for 16 years. During his Hopkins’ engagement at CTY, he was also a senior education consultant to the U.S. Department of State for 11 years and chaired the Advisory Committee on Exceptional Children and Youth.  He served as a “private tutor” to then Prime Minister Tony Blair on the topic of talent development and global competitiveness.

Durden served as chair of the advisory board of the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars (the Faculty Fulbright program) and as a member of the board of trustees of the Institute of International Education (IIE) as well as chair of the German Chancellors Fellowship U.S. Selection Committee (Humboldt Foundation). He was a trustee of St. Paul’s School (MD) and Indian Mountain School (CT). He currently serves as a trustee of Walden University and Squashwise Baltimore, a non-profit organization to help Baltimore City youth achieve their academic goals through squash and associated academic tutoring. He is also chair of the board of trustees of Columbia College Hollywood/Flashpoint College, Chicago, a joint non-profit, higher education institution focused on the liberal arts, the arts, film and media. He was appointed to the honorary council of LEAD WITH LANGUAGES campaign commencing March 1, 2017. This campaign was undertaken at the bipartisan request of the U.S. Congress. He was also appointed in 2019 as Ambassador to Maryland (USA) for the University of Freiburg, Germany.

Durden has published and spoken widely on topics ranging from German literature to gifted and talented education, international education policy, higher education, first-generation college students, international education, the distinctiveness of U.S. higher education and the liberal arts. His most recent publication appeared in the London Times (and was reprinted in PIE) and is entitled, ”Can an American Liberal Arts Approach Improve the British Higher Education System” and he is currently writing about what he is calling “precision education.”

Reference Materials

Living on the Diagonal and Other Selected Writings, by William G. Durden
Leading Minds, by Howard Gardner
The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, by Lynda Gratton & Andrew Scott
I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life, by Ed Yong
Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don’t Have To, by David A. Sinclair with Matthew D LaPlante
The Third chapter: Passion, Risk and Adventure in the 25 Years AFTER 50, by Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot.

Video of the Lecture

Kathryn Abrams

University of California, Berkeley Law

Storytelling, Emotion Culture, and Performative Citizenship in the Undocumented Immigrants Movement

Thursday, September 26, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

How have a group of immigrants who lack formal legal status, and have been targeted by anti-immigrant enforcement in their state, developed the sense of authorization necessary to become outspoken and effective activists? This lecture, which draws on four years of observation and interviews with undocumented activists in Phoenix, Arizona, will explore three practices that have helped to form this new social movement.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the departments of philosophy and political science, the Program in Policy Studies and the Churchill Fund.  It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Kathryn Abrams is Herma Hill Kay Distinguished Professor of Law at UC-Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches Constitutional Law, Feminist Legal Theory, and Law and Social Movements. Her early scholarship on constitutional and statutory civil rights – including the Voting Rights Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act – led to a career-long interest in social movements that aim to secure greater equality under law. Her work on feminist legal theory analyzed the use of experiential narratives, and the character of women’s agency under circumstances of constraint. More recently she has become interested in the role of emotion in adjudication, rights claiming, and social movement mobilization. These interests have fueled her current project, a book on the mobilization of undocumented immigrants in Arizona, tentatively titled Open Hand, Closed Fist: Undocumented Immigrants Organize in the Valley of the Sun.

Video of the Lecture

Kwame Anthony Appiah – “Morgan Lecturer”

New York University

Morgan Lecture

Identity at Home and in the Wider World

Thursday, September 19, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Appiah will first explore the idea of identity philosophically, then focus on the psychology of identity and the challenges of managing identities in a humane way. He will examine how one particular identity—social class—works in our own society today, and end by discussing the role of identities across the world, defending the continuing relevance of a cosmopolitanism that is very much under attack. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Robert Lecture Fund in the Department of Classical Studies, and the Churchill Fund. It is  also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Exciting and erudite, Kwame Anthony Appiah challenges us to look beyond the boundaries—real and imagined—that divide us, and to celebrate our common humanity. Named one of Foreign Policy’s Top 100 public intellectuals, one of the Carnegie Corporation’s “Great Immigrants,” and awarded a National Humanities Medal by The White House, Appiah currently teaches at NYU, though he’s previously taught at Princeton, Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Duke, and the University of Ghana. He considers readers’ ethical quandries in a weekly column as “The Ethicist” for The New York Times Magazine. From 2009 to 2012 he served as President of the PEN American Center, the world’s oldest human rights organization. He is currently chair of The Man Booker Prize.

Anthony Appiah’s book Cosmopolitanism is a manifesto for a world where identity has become a weapon and where difference has become a cause of pain and suffering. Cosmopolitanism won the Arthur Ross Book Award, the most significant prize given to a book on international affairs. In The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen, Appiah lays out how honor propelled moral revolutions in the past—and could do so in the future. Walter Isaacson (Steve Jobs) calls it “an indispensible book for both moral philosophers and honorable citizens.” Among his most recent books are As If: Idealization and Ideals, an exploration of the way ideals facilitate human progress; Mistaken Identities, further explores subjects of his popular BBC series; and the brand new The Lies That Bind, an incandescent exploration of the nature and history of the identities that define us.

Kwame Anthony Appiah was born in London to a Ghanaian father and a white mother. He was raised in Ghana, and educated in England, at Cambridge University, where he received a Ph.D. in philosophy. As a scholar of African and African-American studies, he established himself as an intellectual with a broad reach. His book In My Father’s House and his collaborations with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.—including The Dictionary of Global Culture and Africana—are major works of African struggles for self-determination. In 2009, he was featured in Astra Taylor’s documentary Examined Life, alongside Martha Nussbaum, Slavoj Zizek, and other leading contemporary philosophers.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison, Patricia Hill Collins, Winona LaDuke, Lila Abu-Lughod and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz .

 

Jo Handelsman – “Joseph Priestley Award Recipient”

Wisconsin Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Joseph Priestley Award Celebration Lecture

Microbial Communities—The Original Internet of Everything

Wednesday, September 18, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Microbial communities run the world. Although they are too small to see with the naked eye, microorganisms determine the health of humans, our food supply, and the environment. They accomplish their amazing feats working in concert in communities, but there is little knowledge about what makes these communities robust and stable. A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

The Joseph Priestley Award recipient is chosen by a different science department each year. The Department of Biology has selected this year’s recipient. The event is supported by the College’s Priestley Fund and is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of biology, chemistry, earth sciences, environmental studies, mathematics & computer science, psychology, and physics & astronomy and the Churchill Fund.  It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by speaker)

Jo Handelsman is the director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Vilas Research Professor, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor. She previously served as a science advisor to President Barack Obama as the associate director for science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) where she served for three years until January 2017, and was on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin and Yale University before that. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in molecular biology and has since authored over 200 scientific research publications, 30 editorials, and 29 essays. She has authored numerous articles about classroom methods and mentoring and she is co-author of six books about teaching – Entering Mentoring and Scientific Teaching. She is responsible for groundbreaking studies in microbial communication and work in the field of metagenomics. She is also widely recognized for her contributions to science education and diversity in science. Notably, she received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring from President Obama in 2011, and in 2012, Nature named her one of “ten people who mattered this year” for her research on gender bias in science.

Joseph Priestley Lecture
The Joseph Priestley Award is presented by Dickinson College in memory of Joseph Priestley, discoverer of oxygen, to a distinguished scientist whose work has contributed to the welfare of humanity. The award, first presented in 1952, recognizes outstanding achievement and contribution to our understanding of science and the world.

Video of the Lecture

Gender, Religion, and Violence

Tuesday, March 26, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists:

Margee Ensign, Dickinson College
Jean-Pierre Karegeye, (moderator), Dickinson College
Christina Li, U.S. Department of State, Office of Religion and Global Affairs
Stephanie Ogorzalek, U.S. Department of State, Secretary’s Office of Global Women’s Issues
Celestino Perez, U.S. Army War College

In several current world conflicts, multiple sides claim religious belief as a motivation for violent actions, including gender-based violence. In fact, the U.N. “Plan of Action for Religious Leaders and Actors to Prevent Incitement to Violence That Could Lead to Atrocity Crimes” lists gender-based violence as one of the key elements related to atrocity crimes. Panelists will discuss prevention strategies, military actions, education, government policies, and constructions of gender.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Churchill Fund. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the speakers)

Margee Ensign became Dickinson’s 29th president on July 1, 2017. Prior to Dickinson she served for seven years as the president of the American University of Nigeria (AUN), a young, private university based on the U.S model of university education. There she oversaw the building of the sustainable campus, the creation of the finest digital library on the continent, the establishment of a law school as well as a graduate school, and a very active program of community engagement and humanitarian assistance. Pres. Ensign also co-founded the Adamawa Peace Initiative, a locally based response to the threat from Boko Haram violence, which successfully promoted peace in the area, and assisted close to 300,000 refugees for three years.

Pres. Ensign left her California home for New College in Florida where she received her B.A. in peace studies and international relations. She went on to earn her master’s and Ph.D. in international political economy from the University of Maryland. From there she proceeded to teach at Columbia University where she was an assistant professor of both economics and political science while serving as the director of the International Political Economy program. Moving to Washington DC, she assumed the role of director of the USAID’s development program through Tulane University, then diving into full-time university administration at the University of the Pacific where she was dean of the School of International Studies and associate provost for international initiatives.

The author and editor of four books, including Rwanda: History and Hope and Doing Good or Doing Well? Japan’s Foreign Aid Program, she has presented at the World Economic Forum, been interviewed multiple times by the BBC and CNN, written for The Washington Post, is a blogger for The Huffington Post, and has testified before Congress on international affairs, defense and foreign assistance.

Jean-Pierre Karegeye is a visiting international scholar in philosophy at Dickinson College. In addition to a Ph.D. in Francophone literature (University of California at Berkeley), Karegeye earned two master’s degrees in social ethics/moral theology (JST at Santa Clara University) and in French (UC Berkeley), three bachelor’s degrees in African linguistics, philosophy, and theology. His work on genocide, religious violence, and child soldiering focuses on testimony and explores both fictional and non-fictional narratives. Some of his current projects explore how genocide and religious radicalization in Africa imply a reconstruction and a relocation of social sciences and humanities. Publications include Children in Armed Conflicts (2012),  “Rwanda’s Paradox of remembering and Suffering”, (2012) “Ruanda : de la literatura post-genocidio o el dialogo entre testimonio y compromiso” (2012) “Religion, Politics, and Genocide in Rwanda” (2012). He recently co-edited with Margee Ensign, a Peace Studies Special issue  “Religion at War and Peace” (forthcoming).

Christina Li is an advisor in the Office of Religion and Global Affairs (RGA) at the Department of State. Prior to joining RGA, Christina managed $50 million in programs for Asia. Her policy experience has been informed by her work in Fortune 500 and Silicon Valley start-up companies, where she led cross-functional teams in risk analysis and marketing. She also possesses experiences working in microfinance and education focused faith-based NGOs.

Christina holds degrees from Stanford and Oxford Universities, as well as the University of California in economics, international human rights law, and international development respectively.

Stephanie Ogorzalek, senior policy advisor in the Secretary’s Office of Global Women’s Issues, leads the U.S. Department of State’s work on preventing and responding to gender-based violence globally.  She previously worked in the Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, coordinating U.S. democracy and human rights policy in West and Central Africa and South America.  Prior to joining the Department of State, Stephanie served as a Strategic Communications Analyst for the Department of Defense, advising on the use of messaging to prevent and mitigate violent conflict and encourage community reconciliation.  She also worked as a social development consultant for the Inter-American Development Bank’s Gender and Diversity Division in Bogota, Colombia, managing efforts to combat gender-based violence and foster post-conflict opportunities for women.  Stephanie holds a MA from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and BA from the University of Notre Dame.

Celestino “Tino” Perez, Jr. is a colonel in the U.S. Army and an associate professor at the U.S. Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, PA, where he teaches national-security policy and strategy. He is trained as a political theorist with a Ph.D. in political science from Indiana University at Bloomington. His military deployments including service in Iraq during 2007 and 2008 and Afghanistan in 2011. His previous teaching assignments include teaching courses in political theory at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and an advanced scholars seminar in strategy and military planning at the U.S. Army Command & General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS. His current research interests include political judgment and military ethics, and his overarching aim is to curate scholarship, especially political science and theory, so that it is useful practitioners of politics.

Video of the Discussion

Lilliana Mason

University of Maryland, College Park

Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity

Wednesday, March 20, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

In her book, Uncivil Agreement, Mason looks at the growing social gulf across racial, religious, and cultural lines, which have recently come to divide neatly between the two major political parties. She argues that group identifications have changed the way we think and feel about ourselves and our opponents.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of philosophy; political science; and sociology; and the program in policy studies. It was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s student project managers and is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Lilliana Mason is assistant professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland, College Park, and author of Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity (University of Chicago Press). She received her Ph.D. in political psychology from Stony Brook University and her B.A. in politics from Princeton University. Her research on partisan identity, partisan bias, social sorting, and American social polarization has been published in journals such as American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, and Political Behavior, and featured in media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, and National Public Radio. Mason received the 2017 Emerging Scholar Award from the Political Organizations and Parties Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA). Her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, philanthropic foundations, and social media platforms.

Sarah McBride

Activist

Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Sarah McBride is the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign and one of America’s leading public voices in the fight for LGBTQ equality. Her moving memoir, Tomorrow Will Be Different, chronicles her journey as a transgender woman, from coming out to her family and school community, to fighting for equality in her home state and nationally, to her heartbreaking romance with her late husband. A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Services, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the department of women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the Churchill Fund, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Inclusivity and Outlaw at PSU -Dickinson School of Law. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Photo Credit: B Proud

Sarah McBride is a progressive activist and currently the national press secretary at the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization. In 2016, Sarah made history when she became the first openly transgender person to address a major party convention.

A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Sarah has been involved in politics and progressive advocacy for more than a decade. She co-founded a statewide high school young Democrats organization and worked for the campaigns of Governor Jack Markell (D-DE) and Attorney General Beau Biden (D-DE). During her sophomore year of college, Sarah was elected student body president at American University.

Sarah first made national headlines when, at the end of her term as student body president, she came out publicly as transgender in the student newspaper. She went on to intern in the Obama White House, the first openly trans woman to do so, and, after graduating from college, helped lead the successful effort to pass gender identity nondiscrimination protections in Delaware.

It was during her time at the White House that Sarah met Andrew Cray, a transgender man and fellow advocate. The two fell in love and began working together in the fight for LGBTQ equality. Andy was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2014, and just days after they married, he tragically passed away. Andy’s passing instilled in Sarah a firm belief in the urgency of political and social change.

Now as a spokesperson for the nation’s largest LGBTQ advocacy organization, Sarah has become one of America’s most public voices in the fight for LGBTQ equality, culminating in her address before the nation during the 2016 presidential election. Her moving memoir, Tomorrow Will Be Different chronicles her journey as a transgender woman, from coming out to her family and school community, to fighting for equality in her home state and nationally, to her heartbreaking romance with her late husband.

From Delaware to North Carolina to Texas, Sarah is working to resist the politics of hate and to move equality forward.

 

 

Unveiling America: Addressing Issues of Contemporary Homelessness

Thursday, February 28, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Jim Hoefler (moderator),  Dickinson College
Christina Kapp, Cumberland County Housing & Redevelopment Authorities (Panelists was unable to present due to unforeseen circumstances)
Beth Kempf, Community CARES
Scott Shewell, Safe Harbour
Tim Whelan, Cumberland County Housing & Redevelopment Authorities

A panel of community leaders will discuss their efforts to find sustainable solutions to homelessness in this region.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund; the departments of English; American studies; religion; and sociology; and the health studies program. It was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s student project managers and is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Jim Hoefler is professor of political science and coordinator of the policy studies program here at Dickinson where he has been teaching courses on politics and policy making since he joined the faculty in 1989.

Hoefler’s primary area of research is end-of-life care and end-of-life decision making. He has published several books and numerous articles in this area and has served on the UPMC Pinnacle Carlisle’s Biomedical Ethics Committee since 1993. Jim has also published several websites, done numerous interviews on television and radio, given talks all across the country, and taught courses on the subject of “Managing Death” both here at the college and at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad in Copenhagen.

In his spare time Hoefler is working to extend the Cumberland Valley Rail Trail from Newville to Carlisle. He also volunteers with Domestic Violence Services of Cumberland and Perry Counties.

Christina Kapp was born into a public-service focused family in a small village just outside of Cincinnati, Ohio, and grew up doing disaster relief and community service work with her father throughout the Midwest and Atlantic south.  Kapp majored in radio broadcasting with a minor in community development at Mt. Vernon Nazarene University, working for local radio stations and continuing her practice of community outreach and disaster services. After Mt. Vernon, she moved to New York City to continue her studies in theology and social practice at The Salvation Army’s College for Officer’s Training, where she graduated as a commissioned officer with the rank of captain.

While in NYC, she served as a first-wave first responder at Ground Zero on 9/11, running the Greenwich St. Mobile Kitchen and First Aid Station, serving the NYPD, FDNY, and other rescue workers for months after the attack.

Following her service at Ground Zero, she served as a corps officer in The Salvation Army for 12 years, serving in New York City, Maine, South Carolina, New Jersey, Scranton PA, and Carlisle PA, focusing on marginalized youth, poverty issues, homelessness eradication, and food insecurity remediation. She has commanded homeless shelters, drug and alcohol halfway houses, and drop-in centers for the homeless, developed arts programming curricula for underprivileged youth, revitalized holiday assistance services, strategized and campaigned for community- and county-wide information sharing programs, and even established a new Salvation Army chapter from the ground up in Central NJ.

When her time with The Salvation Army came to an end, Kapp settled in Carlisle, PA, where she spent several years working in hospice and dementia care as a recreational therapist and chaplain, before taking a two-year long ‘private sector sabbatical’  to work for an international large-format print marketing company as their U.S. national accounts manager, while still engaging as a social activist and as a non-profit coordinator for several projects here in Carlisle [First Night Carlisle, V-Day Carlisle, The Pomfret Group].

In December of 2017, Chris returned to the public sector as the coordinated entry regional manager for the Central Valley Regional Homeless Advisory Board, working through the Cumberland County Housing Authority.  She has helped to implement and oversee one of the most substantial federal and county systems change strategies that has happened in many years, creating ‘one front door’ into the social services system and facilitating unprecedented inter-agency collaborative efforts to end homelessness in our region. She also currently serves as the vice-president of the Cumberland-Perry Local Housing Options Team.

Beth Kempf is the executive director of a non-profit called Community CARES, which provides shelter to about seventy men, women and children every night in Carlisle Pennsylvania.  Beth desires to provide a door of hope, particularly those who experience homelessness.  Before coming to CARES, Beth took teams of people around the world as an ordained minister helping to provided food and shelter for the most vulnerable in those communities.  She believes that serving individuals with dignity and respect can create a sense of community and relationship that can inspire individuals to be better equipped to transform their circumstance.  Her most favorite people to be with are her husband and two daughters, the youngest they adopted at age 15.

Scott K. Shewell is the president and CEO of Safe Harbour.  Safe Harbour’s mission is to provide housing and supportive services for homeless and nearly homeless individuals and families to help them achieve independent living by improving their basic life skills.

As president, Shewell is responsible for the overall direction and administration of Safe Harbour’s programs in accordance with the organization’s mission and objectives. He manages Safe Harbour finances, facilities, policies, practices, staff, and the relationships between employees and the clients that they serve.  Working with the board of directors, Shewell participates in a collaborative working effort to monitor progress and promote the growth of the organization.

Shewell previously served as vice president for community relations and development for Safe Harbour.  In that role, he was responsible for Safe Harbour’s fundraising initiatives, including the Annual Campaign, major gifts and planned giving, grant development, and state and federal appropriations. Shewell also directed the organization’s public relations and marketing initiatives, special events, and government and community relations.

Prior to joining Safe Harbour, Shewell served as higher education business development manager for Delta Development Group, Inc.  His previous professional positions included serving as public relations director for Barry Group Inc., a strategic planning and implementation firm in York, Pennsylvania; director of public relations with the Pennsylvania School Boards Association; director of public affairs with the State University of New York at Potsdam (SUNY Potsdam); and press secretary, with the Office of the Chancellor for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).

Tim Whelan serves as the executive director of the Cumberland County Housing and Redevelopment Authorities.  In this position, he manages and directs the operations of two complex local government authorities.  The two organizations lead operations of rental assistance programs in Cumberland and Perry counties; operation of public housing program; development and management of multi-family, special needs and homeless housing programs; community development and/or redevelopment activities and programs.  He leads a staff of 60 with combined annual budget of $15 million.

Previously, he served as the vice-president for Community Impact with the United Way of the Capital Region from February 2001 to July 2016.  In this capacity, he was responsible for implementing the United Way’s “community building” activities which focused on developing the Capital Region’s capacity to respond to human service needs.  In addition, he oversaw the organization’s fund distribution process, Volunteer Center and community research activities.

In addition, in his career Whelan served as executive director of the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art and the South Central Pennsylvania Food Bank.  He worked as the first Eastern Region Coordinator for Second Harvest, the National Network of Food Banks and for the American Red Cross, Baltimore Regional Chapter in Disaster Services.

Whelan holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Frostburg State College in history, Far Eastern Concentration and a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

Related Links

Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania
National Alliance to End Homeless
National Coalition for the Homeless
National Low Income Housing Coalition
Eastern PA Continuums of Care
Connect To Home: Coordinated Entry System of Eastern PA (CES)

Video of the Discussion

 

 

 

Sharrell Luckett

Scholar & Performance Artist

Program is part of Love Your Body Week

YoungGiftedandFat: From Liberation to Creation

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

YoungGiftedandFat author, Sharrell Luckett, outlines the journey towards self-love through the sharing of narratives that are at once specific and universal. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. This event is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Love Your Body Week events are co-sponsored by Clarke Forum; Women’s and Gender Resource Center; Office of LGBTQ Services, Student Life and Campus Engagement; Wellness Center; PALS; Psi Chi; Psych Club; Center for Service, Spirituality and Social Justice; Access and Disability Services; Departments of Theatre & Dance; Psychology; and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies; Creative Writing and the Waidner-Spahr Library.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Sharrell D. Luckett, Ph.D. is director of the Helen Weinberger Center for Drama and Playwriting and assistant professor of drama and performance studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cincinnati. She is also affiliate faculty in the women’s, gender, and sexuality studies program, in addition to faculty collaborator with the College-Conservatory of Cincinnati.

Luckett is the author of YoungGiftedandFat: An Autoethnography of Size, Sexuality, and Privilege, and co-editor of Black Acting Methods: Critical Approaches, an award-winning book that highlights performance theory rooted in black American cultural aestheticsHer upcoming book projects engage with the work of Tarell Alvin McCraney, the Freddie Hendricks Youth Ensemble of Atlanta, and transweight celebrity performance.

Luckett is a proud invitee of Harvard University’s Mellon Institute of Theater and Performance Research, Cornell University’s Performance Encounters series, Northwestern University’s Mellon Program in Black Feminist Performance, and the esteemed Lincoln Center Directors Lab in NY.

Video of the Lecture

 

Nikole Hannah-Jones

Award-winning Investigative Reporter for The New York Times Magazine

Morgan Lecture & KDP Spring Forum & MLK Jr. Symposium

Understanding the Impact of Modern Day Segregation

Award-winning The New York Times Magazine investigative reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, will explore the important roles schools play in their communities, how they’re affected by their surrounding neighborhoods, and how seeing race from the lens of education tells a whole new story of inequality in America.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by Dickinson’s Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the International Education Honor Society; the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity; the Churchill Fund, the Department of English; the Women’s & Gender Resource Center; and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Nikole Hannah-Jones covers racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine, and has spent years chronicling the way official policy has created—and maintains—racial segregation in housing and schools. Her deeply personal reports on the black experience in America offer a compelling case for greater equity. She has written extensively on the history of racism, school resegregation, and the disarray of hundreds of desegregation orders, as well as the decades-long failure of the federal government to enforce the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act. She is currently writing a book on school segregation called The Problem We All Live With, to be published on the One World imprint of Penguin/Random House.

Her piece “Worlds Apart” in The New York Times Magazine won the National Magazine Award for “journalism that illuminates issues of national importance” as well as the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism. In 2016, she was awarded a Peabody Award and George Polk Award for radio reporting for her This American Life story, “The Problem We All Live With.” She was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists, and was also named to The Root 100. Her reporting has also won Deadline Club Awards, Online Journalism Awards, the Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service, the Fred M. Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting, the Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Leadership, and was a previous finalist for the National Magazine Award.

Hannah-Jones co-founded the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting with the goal of increasing the number of reporters and editors of color. She holds a Master of Arts in Mass Communication from the University of North Carolina and earned her BA in History and African-American studies from the University of Notre Dame. For the Institute for Advanced Journalism Studies, she investigated social changes under Raul Castro and the impact of universal healthcare on Cuba’s educational system. She was also selected by the University of Pennsylvania to report on the impact of the Watts Riots for a study marking the 40th anniversary of the Kerner Commission report, 2007. Along with The New York Times, her reporting has been featured in ProPublicaThe Atlantic Magazine, Huffington Post, Essence Magazine, The Week MagazineGrist, Politico Magazine, and on Face the Nation, This American Life, NPR, The Tom Joyner Morning Show, MSNBC, C-SPAN, Democracy Now, and radio stations across the country.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison, Patricia Hill Collins, Winona LaDuke, Lila Abu-Lughod, and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.

 

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Feminist Sorority Women: A Place for Intersectionality in Tradition?

Thursday, November 29, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Donna Bickford (moderator), Dickinson College
Brontè Burleigh-Jones, Dickinson College
Diana Turk, New York University
Deborah Whaley, University of Iowa

Sororities can be both a place for women’s empowerment and a site that produces elitism and constructs stereotypical gender roles. This student-initiated panel of experts will address the history of sororities and the possibilities for activism within them.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of English, American studies, philosophy, sociology, women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the First Year Seminar Program, the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, Kappa Delta Pi, and the Churchill Fund. This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Donna M. Bickford has served as the director of the Women’s and Gender Resource Center at Dickinson since January 2016. She also teaches in women’s, gender and sexuality studies and serves as co-chair of the President’s Commission on Women, Gender and Sexuality. Previously she was the director of the Carolina Women’s Center and associate director of the Office for Undergraduate Research at UNC-Chapel Hill. Prior to UNC, she was on faculty in the women’s studies program at the University of Rhode Island. She taught as a Fulbright Scholar at Åbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland.

Bickford earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rhode Island. Her research interests are in the connections between literature and social justice, and contemporary U.S. women writers. A co-edited anthology, University and College Women’s and Gender Equity Centers, is forthcoming in August from Routledge, and her book Understanding Marge Piercy is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2019.

Brontè Burleigh-Jones serves as the vice president for finance and administration at Dickinson College where she oversees all areas of finance and campus operations, including Facilities Management, Dining Services, Human Resource Services, Financial Operations, Conferences and Special Events, Bookstore, Mail Center and Children’s Center.  Burleigh-Jones was recently presented with the 2017 Professional Development Award from the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) at its annual meeting in Minneapolis. She received the award for extensive volunteer service to the association’s professional development activities and publications programs.

Burleigh-Jones is a frequent presenter on a variety of topics, including finance, accreditation, communication, leadership and diversity at NACUBO, American Council of Education (ACE) and Association of Governing Boards (AGB) conferences. She is a frequent author for NACUBO’s Business Officer magazine and, in 2015, presented the “CBO Speaks” podcast, which remains the most downloaded from NACUBO’s website.

Burleigh-Jones has more than 25 years of experience in financial and facilities management in higher education in addition to project management and auditing experience in the state government and nonprofit sectors. Before joining Dickinson in 2013, she served as treasurer of St. John’s College. Previous leadership positions also include vice president for administration and finance at Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas, as well as roles there as dean of enrollment management and assistant dean of financial services. She holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and an MBA from American University and a doctorate in higher education administration from the University of Texas, Austin. She also is a graduate of the Harvard Institute for Higher Education and the HERS Institute for Women in Higher Education at Wellesley College.

Burleigh-Jones is also a very proud Diamond Life Member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., She was initiated at American University through the Nu Alpha Chapter in 1989 and has maintained continuous and active involvement with the sorority since that time.  Her involvement has included serving as the chapter treasurer through both her collegiate and alumnae chapters, serving as the Assistant Controller at the sorority’s National Headquarters (1992-1996) and serving as the collegiate advisor for the Alpha Kappa Chapter at Huston-Tillotson University (1999-2005). She recently played a key role in the reactivation of the Upsilon Delta Chapter at Dickinson College, ending the chapter’s five-year absence from campus (2013-2018). 

Diana B. Turk is director of teacher education and associate professor of social studies education at NYU – Steinhardt. As director of the Steinhardt Teacher Residency, she is passionate about preparing highly effective teachers for under-served settings who are able to reach and teach all students, including those with specialized language and learning needs. She believes that equity, inclusion, and passion belong in every classroom and that all students should have the opportunity to learn in settings that forefront inquiry, intellectual creativity, and joy.

Turk received her Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Maryland at College Park. She is co-author of Teaching Recent Global History (Routledge, 2014) and Teaching US History: Dialogues Between Teachers and Historians (Routledge, 2010), and author of Bound by a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women’s Fraternities, 1870-1920 (New York University Press, 2004). She has also written several articles and book chapters on innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to teaching history and social studies.

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley is an artist, curator, writer, and professor of American studies and African American studies at the University of Iowa. She received degrees in American studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz (BA), California State University, Fullerton (MA), and the University of Kansas (PhD). Her research and teaching fields include the institutional history, theories, and methods of American and cultural studies, 19th and 20th century American cultural history, comparative ethnic studies, Black cultural studies, the digital humanities, popular culture, and the visual arts.

Whaley has published original art, poetry, as well as articles on social movements, popular culture, sequential art, documentary photography, and film. She has been a resident visiting scholar at the Center for Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and was a recipient of a grant from the Monroe Trotter Institute for Black Culture for her research on responses to 9/11 in Black expressive art and in the public sphere.

Her recent book is Black Women in Sequence: Re-inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime (2015); it explores graphic novel production and comic book fandom, looking in particular at African, African American, and multiethnic women as deployed in television, film, animation, gaming, and print representations of comic book and graphic novel characters. Professor Whaley’s first book is: Disciplining Women: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black Counterpublics, and the Cultural Politics of Black Sororities (2010). In it, she examines the cultural practices, cultural work, and politics of the oldest historically Black sorority.

Her book in progress is titled Feeling Her Fragmented Mind: Women, Race, and Dissociative Identities in Popular Culture. It is an examination of dissociative identities (formerly known as multiple personality disorder) as a narrative trope in popular literature, film, television, and memoir, with a particular focus on Latinas, White, Asian/American, and Black women. More than an interpretive and critical analysis of popular cultural productions, Feeling Her Fragmented Mind engages with the intersection of différance, affect, and disability studies and combines the humanities and social sciences to explore the racial, class, and gender disparities in the medical industrial complex.

Whaley was co-curator, with Kembrew McLeod, of the University of Iowa Museum of Art exhibition, “Two Turntables and a Microphone: Hiphop Contexts Featuring Harry Allen’s Part of the Permanent Record; Photos From the Previous Century,” and she has served as a consultant or feature writer for exhibitions on Black popular music and Black sequential art. Whaley is on the editorial board of the journal American Studies, and formerly served on the editorial board for American Studies: Euroasian Perspectives and Lexington Press’ Africana Studies book series. She was the 2013-2014 chair of the Women’s Committee for the American Studies Association and now is serving as a committee member for the ASA’s committee on departments, programs, and centers.

 

 

Jane Mt. Pleasant

Cornell University

The Paradox of Productivity: Lessons from an Indigenous Agriculture

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) agricultural systems in the 17th and 18th centuries were three to five times as productive as their European counterparts at the same time. This lecture provides insights into this ‘paradox of productivity.’

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and a Civic Learning and Engagement Initiative Grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of anthropology & archaeology, American studies, environmental studies, philosophy, history and the food studies program. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series and its semester theme, Indigeneity in the Americas.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Jane Mt. Pleasant, associate professor in the Horticulture Section of School of Integrative Plant Science at Cornell University, studies indigenous cropping systems and their productivity. Using her expertise in agricultural science, she examines agriculture from a multi-disciplinary perspective that includes history, archeology, paleobotany, and cultural/social anthropology. Although much of her work has focused on Haudenosaunee agriculture in the 16 through 18th centuries, more recently she has expanded her research to include pre-Columbian agriculture in eastern and central North America.

Mt. Pleasant received her B.S. and M.S. from Cornell University and her Ph.D. (in soil science) from North Carolina State University. She is of Tuscarora ancestry.

Video of the Lecture

Daniel Ziblatt

Harvard University

How Democracies Die

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Is democracy in decline around the world? Is American democracy itself in trouble? Examining the history of democracy in the United States against a global backdrop of how democracies have died throughout history, Ziblatt comes to some surprising conclusions about the sources of vulnerability and strength in American democracy today. After Ziblatt’s presentation, Prof. David O’Connell will offer a brief scholarly counterargument that challenges certain aspects of Ziblatt’s book as they pertain to the American political system.  A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of political science and international studies, and the Churchill Fund. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Daniel Ziblatt is Eaton Professor of the Science of Government at Harvard University and a faculty associate at Harvard’s Minda De Gunzburg Center for European Studies. He researches and teaches in European politics, democratization, and historical political economy.

He is the author of three books, including two recent books, How Democracies Die (2018) (co-authored with Steven Levitsky), which was a 2018 New York Times Best seller as well as Conservative Parties and the Birth of Democracy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017), the winner of several prizes including the American Political Science Association’s 2018 Woodrow Wilson award and the American Sociological Association’s 2018 Barrington Moore Prize. His first book was Structuring the State: The Formation of Italy and Germany and the Puzzle of Federalism (Princeton University Press, 2006).  Recent scholarly articles have appeared in Journal of Economic HistoryAmerican Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, and World Politics.

Ziblatt is the director of a research program at Harvard University called Politics Through Time, which is a hub for social scientific research on the political history of democracy.  He has held fellowships in the United States and Europe, most recently as the Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute (Florence Italy), as well as fellowships at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study.  He has also been a DAAD Fellow in Berlin, an Alexander von Humboldt visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Cologne and the University of Konstanz, Germany, and visiting professor at Sciences Po Paris (2014) and Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (2009).  He serves on governing boards of several academic institutions and the editorial board of academic journals, including Comparative Political Studies, World Politics, and German Politics and Society.

oconneld OConnell DavidDavid O’Connell is an assistant professor of political science at Dickinson College. His major research interests include the presidency and the role of religion in American politics. O’Connell is the author of God Wills It: Presidents and the Political Use of Religion (Routledge, 2014), and his research and writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Politics and Religion, Political Science Quarterly, and White House Studies. O’Connell is also currently completing work on a series of articles examining how members of Congress use their Instagram accounts. A frequent media commentator on American politics, O’Connell has been interviewed by C-SPAN, Fox News, ABC 27, CBS 21, FOX 43, WGAL 8 and WITF, and he has been quoted by national print outlets ranging from CNN to The Christian Science Monitor to the Associated Press. O’Connell received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University, and holds a B.A. in political science and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors. O’Connell is the 2018 recipient of Dickinson’s Constance & Rose Ganoe Memorial Award for Inspirational Teaching.

Video of the Lecture

 

Eboo Patel

Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC)

Out of Many Faiths: Religious Diversity and the American Promise

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

America is the most religiously devout country in the Western world and the most religiously diverse nation on the planet. Will America’s identity as a Judeo-Christian nation shift as citizens of different backgrounds grow in numbers and influence? In what ways will minority religious communities themselves change as they take root in American soil? In addressing these questions, Eboo Patel will explore how America’s promise is the guarantee of equal rights and dignity for all, and how that promise is the foundation of America’s unrivaled strength as a nation. A book sale and signing will follow the program.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by The Marjorie M. and Irwin Nat Pincus Fund in Honor of their Daughters, The Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life, the Division of Student Life, the Center for Service, Spirituality & Social Justice, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity, the Departments of Judaic Studies and Religion, the First Year Seminar Program and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Eboo Patel is a leading voice in the movement for interfaith cooperation and the founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), a national nonprofit working to make interfaith cooperation a social norm. He is the author of Acts of Faith, Sacred Ground and Interfaith Leadership. Named by U.S. News & World Report as one of America’s Best Leaders of 2009, Patel served on President Obama’s Inaugural Faith Council. He is a regular contributor to the public conversation around religion in America and a frequent speaker on the topic of religious pluralism. He holds a doctorate in the sociology of religion from Oxford University, where he studied on a Rhodes scholarship. For over fifteen years, Patel has worked with governments, social sector organizations, and college and university campuses to help realize a future where religion is a bridge of cooperation rather than a barrier of division.

Video of the Lecture

Congress to Campus

Monday, October 15, 2018
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Panelists

Don Manzullo, (R-IL, 1993-2013) (Replacing Jim Kolbe, R-AZ)
Betsy Markey, (D-CO, 2009-2011)
David O’Connell (moderator), Dickinson College

Live Stream Link

A bipartisan pair of former members of Congress will look back on their own experiences in government and reflect on the challenges currently facing the United States of America. This discussion will be moderated by political scientist David O’Connell.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the department of political science, the Churchill Fund, and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity.

Biographies (provided by the panelists)

Don Manzullo recently retired as president & CEO, KEI, Korea Economic Institute of America. During his  20  years  of  service  representing  the  16th District  of  Illinois,   Manzullo was  a  leading  voice  in  shaping  congressional  economic  and  foreign  policy towards  the  Asia Pacific region.  He  started  his  career in the  House  of  Representatives  in  1993  on  the  Subcommittee  on  Asia  and  the  Pacific  of  the  House  Foreign  Affairs  Committee  and  ended  his  tenure in Congress serving as the Republican leader of this pivotal subcommittee from 2007 until 2013,  including  chairing  the  Asia  subcommittee  during  his last  two  years in the  House. Manzullo also  served  as  a  member  of  the  Foreign  Affairs  Subcommittee  on  International Economic Policy and Trade.

Manzullo was appointed by House Speaker John Boehner to serve a commissioner on the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, which monitors compliance with human rights obligations and the development of the rule of law in the People’s Republic of China.  He was appointed by a previous speaker to serve as a member of the House Task Force on the Hong Kong Transition.

Manzullo is well-known as a staunch advocate for small business, manufacturing, and trade between the United States and Asian economies.  For 14 years, Manzullo served on the Small Business Committee, first chairing the Exports Subcommittee from 1995 to 2001.  He was then elected by his fellow colleagues to chair the full Small Business Committee – one of just 17 standing committees of the U.S.  House  of  Representatives  – for  a maximum  of  three 2-  year  terms  from  2001  to  2007.

Manzullo  also  served  on the  House  Financial  Services  Committee  for  16  years,  sitting  on  three  important  subcommittees  dealing  with  the  U.S. economic recovery,  capital  markets,  banks,  financial  reforms, and international monetary policy.  He co-founded and co-chaired the bipartisan House Manufacturing Caucus and also served as a co-chair of the House Automotive Caucus.

During the course of his career in Congress,Manzullo authored 17 bills that  were  signed  into  law  by  the  president  and  altered  the  direction  of  18  other  bills  that  also  became  law.    He  also significantly  influenced  over  50  administrative  actions  by  the  Executive  Branch  through  regulatory  changes  or  alterations  to  internal  policy.   Overall,  Manzullo chaired  over 140  hearings   on   diverse   subjects   ranging   from   global   competitiveness   and   manufacturing  to  human  rights.    He  supported  every  free  trade  agreement  (FTA)  in  Congress,  and served on several “whip” teams to encourage his fellow legislators to vote for these market opening initiatives.  Manzullo has been recognized for his leadership on various legislative issues, including receiving the Distinguished Service Award from the Small Business Exporters Association for his work that improved various trade promotion programs, the Leadership Award from the Coalition for Employment through Exports for his legislation that reauthorized the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the prestigious Wings of Liberty Award from the Aerospace Industries Association for his efforts to amend an export control regulation that freed up billions of dollars of commercial aviation parts and components to be sold abroad without requiring a license for each item.

Manzullo was also appointed by the Speaker of the House to serve as chairman of the Canada-U.S. Inter-parliamentary Group and the U.S.-China Inter-parliamentary Exchange. He also was a frequent participant in the U.S.-European Union Inter-parliamentary Exchange; the U.S.-Mexico Inter-parliamentary Exchange; and the U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange program, developing relationships with legislators from all around the world. Manzullo also led two of the largest official Congressional delegations to visit dignitaries in China, Australia, and New Zealand. Manzullo was one of the first critics of easy lending practices for residential real estate, which created and then led to the collapse of the subprime mortgage market that quickly spread to other financial markets both in the United States and around the world. In 2000, he was an early co-sponsor of the Housing Finance Regulatory Improvement Act, which would have reduced the systemic risk posed to capital markets by financial institutions that engaged in lax mortgage lending practices. Manzullo has spoken before numerous groups on financial services and trade issues. He also gained a reputation for being one of the most knowledgeable U.S. legislators on manufacturing, leading him to be a featured speaker before numerous manufacturing organizations such as the National Association of Manufacturers, the Precision Metalforming Association, and the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering (SAMPE). Mr. Manzullo has also visited hundreds of manufacturing facilities in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He also authored numerous op-eds and letters to the editor that appeared in local and national publications, including the Rockford Register Star, the Northwest Herald, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Times. Prior to his congressional service, Manzullo practiced law as an attorney in Oregon, Illinois before entering politics. He holds a Juris Doctor from Marquette University (1970) and a B.A. from American University (1967), and honorary Juris Doctor from Inha University, Inchon, Korea.

Betsy Markey has over 35 years of experience as a member of Congress, a senior federal government executive, the co-founder and CFO of a high tech company and a small retail store.

In January 2015, Markey was appointed by President Obama to serve as the regional administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration based in Denver. In this capacity she oversaw the delivery of the agency’s small business programs and services in Colorado, Montana, North and South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.  As an appointee she was required to resign her position in January 2017.

In 2011, Markey was appointed to serve as the assistant secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Washington DC. She facilitated the direct line of communication between the department and governors and mayors across the country on all DHS mission areas, including cyber security, terrorism prevention, transportation security, immigration enforcement, border security, human trafficking and disaster assistance.

Markey was elected to serve as a member of Congress in Colorado’s 4th Congressional District in 2008, and represented over 700,000 constituents in one of the country’s largest congressional districts in the 111th Congress. She served on the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on Agriculture. Prior to being elected to Congress, she was the regional director in northern Colorado for U.S. Senator Ken Salazar.  She worked closely with local elected officials, businesses, agricultural groups and non-profit groups.

In the late-1980’s, Markey and her husband launched a successful technology company, Syscom Services, which was one of the first companies to market email, and subsequently expanded into the area of web design and web-based information management systems. The firm has been ranked in the Inc. 500 listing of America’s fastest-growing private companies. She participated in the sale of the company to a group of investors.

In the mid-1990’s, she purchased a coffee/ice cream shop in Fort Collins called Huckleberry‘s. After making extensive changes, she sold the business four years later for double the purchase price.

Markey worked for the U.S. Department of State from 1984-1988 as the director of Computer Security Policy and Training, where she traveled extensively to our overseas Embassies and consulates conducting computer security threat and vulnerability analyses. She entered the federal government as a Presidential Management Fellow in 1983, where she held positions as budget and program analyst in the Department of the Treasury and the U.S. Customs Service.

She has also served as president of the board of directors for the Larimer County Food Bank, chair of its Capital Campaign, and a member of the Local Legislative Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Florida and a master’s of public administration from American University.

oconneld OConnell DavidDavid O’Connell is an assistant professor of political science at Dickinson College. His major research interests include the presidency and the role of religion in American politics. O’Connell is the author of God Wills It: Presidents and the Political Use of Religion (Routledge, 2014), and his research and writing has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Politics and Religion, Political Science Quarterly, and White House Studies. O’Connell is also currently completing work on a series of articles examining how members of Congress use their Instagram accounts. A frequent media commentator on American politics, O’Connell has been interviewed by C-SPAN, Fox News, ABC 27, CBS 21, FOX 43, WGAL 8 and WITF, and he has been quoted by national print outlets ranging from CNN to The Christian Science Monitor to the Associated Press. O’Connell received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University, and holds a B.A. in political science and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors. O’Connell is the 2018 recipient of Dickinson’s Constance & Rose Ganoe Memorial Award for Inspirational Teaching.

Video of the Discussion