Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty

The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues is establishing a series of programmatic events dedicated to the theme of leadership in an age of uncertainty. This new initiative is grounded on the reality that today’s generation of Dickinson students confronts a large number of intractable political, economic, and social problems: terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental pollution, global warming, a sustainable energy policy, the ongoing financial crisis, the federal deficit, the amount of public and private debt, the health care crisis, along with issues regarding race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as technology and privacy. These issues and problems directly or indirectly pose challenges to the College and the local community that may in time require fundamental changes in institutions, values, and practices across the public, private, and non-profit sectors of American society. How Dickinsonians respond to these challenges presents us with an opportunity for reflection on the meaning of leadership in the contemporary world.

Kristen Leslie – “Wesley Lecturer”

Leslie PosterEden Theological Seminary

Wesley Lecture

Noisy Believing: Ethical and Spiritual Responses to Sexualized Violence

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Allison Great Hall, 7 p.m.

Transformative responses to sexualized violence reflect an early Methodist ethic that connects faith to public action.  This spirituality encouraged followers to “do all the good you can… for as long as ever you can.”  Holding communities accountable to such a public ethic and teaching the silenced to speak are basic building blocks to changing the nature of sexualized violence on college campuses.

This lecture is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Office of the President and the Center for Service, Spirituality and Social Justice with special thanks to the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church. This event is also co-sponsored by the Prevention, Education and Advocacy Center, the Department of Religion, the Women’s and Gender Resource Center, Dickinson Christian Fellowship and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

The Rev. Kristen Leslie, Ph.D., is a feminist pastoral theologian who addresses issues of resilience in survivors of sexualized violence on college campuses and in the military.  She received a B.A. from the College of Wooster, an MDiv from Yale University Divinity School, and a Ph.D. from the Claremont School of Theology.  An ordained United Methodist minister, she has served as a parish pastor, college chaplain, pastoral counselor, rape counselor and divinity school professor. Presently she is the professor of pastoral theology and care at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri.  She is the author of When Violence is No Stranger: Pastoral Counseling with Survivors of Acquaintance Rape (Fortress Press, 2003) and numerous articles on sexualized violence and the healing role of religious professionals.  She has served as a subject expert for the U.S. Navy and the U. S. Air Force, working to equip chaplains who provide pastoral care in situations involving military sexual assault.  She is a regular lecturer for Operation: Tohidu, a therapeutic retreat center serving the needs of veterans and active duty service members who have experienced sexual assault and other forms of deployment-related trauma.  She actively serves as a consultant to college and university chaplains and Title IX committees responding to college sexual assault.

The Wesley Lecture
The Wesley Lecture grows out of the historical relationship between Dickinson College and the Methodist Church, a relationship that has its roots in the 19th century. The lecture highlights contemporary conversations and controversies in faith communities and in higher education about the importance and role of community, commitment, and service for the education of the citizen-scholar.

 

Jennifer L. Lawless

Lawless Final PosterAmerican University

Women on the Run

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

A widely held belief – often encouraged by politicians and political commentators – is that that the political landscape is more challenging for women. Lawless argues that, for the most part, it’s not. When women run for office, they have very similar experiences to men. The problem is that women don’t run in the first place.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series and the stream on the 2016 Presidential Election.

jen croppedBiography (provided by the speaker)

Jennifer L. Lawless is professor of government at American University, where she is also the director of the Women & Politics Institute. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University in 2003 and her B.A. from Union College in 1997. Professor Lawless’ research, which has been supported by the National Science Foundation, focuses on representation, political ambition, and gender in the electoral process.

Lawless is the author of Becoming a Candidate: Political Ambition and the Decision to Run for Office (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and the co-author of Women on the Run: Gender, Media, and Campaigns in a Polarized Era (Cambridge University Press, 2016), Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned Off to Politics (Oxford University Press, 2015), and It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don’t Run for Office (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Her work has appeared in academic journals including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Perspectives on Politics, Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and Politics & Gender (of which she served as editor from 2010 – 2013). She is also a nationally recognized speaker on electoral politics. Her scholarly analysis and political commentary have been quoted in numerous newspapers, magazines, television news programs, and radio shows, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, USA Today, The New Republic, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Associated Press Newswire, Reuters, The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell, The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer, the CBS Evening News, ABC World News Tonight, CNN.com, and MSNBC.com. In 2006, she sought the Democratic nomination to the U.S. House of Representatives in Rhode Island’s second congressional district.

Raj Patel

Patel PosterUniversity of Texas, Austin and Rhodes University, South Africa

The World That Food Made

Thursday, September 8, 2016
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

We hear a great deal about the food system, about how it’s broken or – indeed – that it’s working exactly as it ought. But it’s not exactly clear what that system is. Once you learn to think systemically, it becomes clear that the most important things the food system has made are things you can’t eat.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, First Year Seminars, the Center for Sustainability Education and the Departments of Environmental Studies, International Business & Management, Anthropology & Archaeology, Biology and the Program in Policy Studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Food and the Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Credit: Sheila Menezes

Credit: Sheila Menezes

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Raj Patel is an award-winning writer, activist and academic. He is a research professor in the Lyndon B Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin and a senior research associate at the Unit for the Humanities at the university currently known as Rhodes University (UHURU), South Africa.

He has degrees from the University of Oxford, the London School of Economics and Cornell University, has worked for the World Bank and WTO, and protested against them around the world. He has been a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley’s Center for African Studies, an honorary research fellow at the School of Development Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and continues to be a fellow at The Institute for Food and Development Policy, also known as Food First. In 2016 was recognized with a James Beard Foundation Leadership Award. Patel co-taught the 2014 Edible Education class at UC Berkeley with Michael Pollan. He was also an IATP Food and Community Fellow from 2011-2013. He has testified about the causes of the global food crisis to the US House Financial Services Committee and was an advisor to Olivier De Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

In addition to numerous scholarly publications in economics, philosophy, politics and public health journals, he regularly writes for The Guardian, and has contributed to the Financial Times, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Times of India, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Mail on Sunday, and The Observer. His first book was Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System and his latest, The Value of Nothing, is a New York Times best-seller.

He can be heard co-hosting the fortnightly food politics podcast The Secret Ingredient with Mother Jones’ Tom Philpott, and KUT’s Rebecca McInroy. He is currently working on a ground-breaking documentary project about the global food system with award-winning director Steve James. He’s also completing a book on world ecology with Jason W Moore for the University of California Press entitled “Seven Cheap Things.”

Video of the Lecture

 

 

Barry W. Lynn ’70 – “Constitution Day Address Lecturer”

Lynn Poster2Executive Director, Americans United for Separation of Church and State

Celebrating a Dead Letter or a Living Document?

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Watch Live Stream

“Originalism” in Constitutional interpretation is often characterized as the only legitimate way to understand the Constitution. If that were true, the “Constitution” would be a dead letter by now, unable to protect the rights of Americans in rapidly changing times.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State’s Dickinson Law and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Barry Lynn photo 2012Biography (provided by the speaker)

Since 1992, the Rev. Barry W. Lynn has served as executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, a Washington, D.C.-based organization dedicated to the preservation of the Constitution’s religious liberty provisions.

In addition to his work as a long-time activist and lawyer in the civil liberties field, Lynn is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ, offering him a unique perspective on church-state issues.

An accomplished speaker and lecturer, Lynn has appeared frequently on television and radio broadcasts to offer analysis of First Amendment issues. News programs on which Lynn has appeared include PBS’s “NewsHour,” NBC’s “Today Show,” Fox News Channel’s “O’Reilly Factor,” ABC’s “Nightline,” CNN’s “Crossfire,” CBS’s “60 Minutes,” ABC’s “Good Morning America,” CNN’s “Larry King Live” and the national nightly news on NBC, ABC and CBS.

Lynn served for a decade as host of the syndicated radio show “Culture Shocks,” a daily look at various issues affecting society and the culture. In the 1990s he was the regular co-host of “Pat Buchanan and Company” and after that did a weekly syndicated radio program, “Review of the News,” with Col. Oliver North. Lynn is a regular guest on nationally broadcast radio programs, including National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” “The Diane Rehm Show,” “Morning Edition” and “Talk of the Nation.” He also appeared on every other national radio network.

Lynn began his professional career working at the national office of the United Church of Christ, including a two-year stint as legislative counsel for the Church’s Office of Church in Society in Washington, D.C. From 1984 to 1991 he was legislative counsel for the Washington office of the American Civil Liberties Union.

In 2006, Lynn authored Piety & Politics: The Right-Wing Assault On Religious Freedom (Harmony Books). In 2008 he coauthored (with C. Welton Gaddy) First Freedom First: A Citizen’s Guide to Protecting Religious Liberty and the Separation of Church and State (Beacon Press). His latest book is God & Government: Twenty-Five Years of Fighting for Equality, Secularism, and Freedom Of Conscience (Prometheus Books).

Lynn writes frequently on religious liberty issues and has had essays published in outlets such as USA Today, Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Nation. Lynn also has op-eds published frequently by the McClatchy and Scripps-Howard newspaper chains.

A member of the Washington, D.C. and U.S. Supreme Court bar, Lynn earned his law degree from Georgetown University Law Center in 1978. In addition, he received his theology degree from Boston University School of Theology in 1973.

Lynn is the winner of many national awards, including the Freedom of Worship Award from the Roosevelt Institute, the Puffin/Nation Foundation’s Creative Citizenship Award, the American Humanist Association’s Religious Liberty Award and an award from the Hugh H. Hefner Foundation for his work to protect freedom of speech. In addition, he has received two awards from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa., where Lynn earned a Bachelor’s degree in English in 1970. In 2007, he was chosen as one of the 25 Most Influential Dickinsonians. In 2010, Lynn was given the college’s Professional Achievement Award.

Lynn, who was born in Harrisburg, Pa., and raised in Bethlehem, Pa., lives in Chevy Chase, Md., with his wife Joanne. They have two children.

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address
The annual address is endowed through the generosity of Winfield C. Cook, former Dickinson Trustee. Each year the Clarke Forum invites a prominent public figure to campus to speak on a contemporary issue related to the Constitution. The event celebrates the signing of the United States Constitution and commemorates Dickinson’s connection to that document, through John Dickinson’s participation as an original signer. Previous speakers have included Kenneth Starr, Ira Glasser, Lowell Weicker, Marjorie Rendell, Tom Ridge and  Michael Chertoff.

Video of the Lecture

 

Perri Klass

Klass Poster 1Professor of Journalism and Pediatrics, New York University

Poverty as a Childhood Disease

Thursday, February 25, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

This talk will look at what poverty does to children, through lenses ranging from fairy tales to health statistics, and discuss the ways in which we can look at childhood poverty as a disease, stunting and depriving children’s minds and bodies–and use that perspective to find ways to think about mitigating the damage and reducing the disease itself.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues  and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, department of economics, educational studies and the health studies program. It was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s student project managers and is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

A children’s book drive is associated with this program and it runs from February 18 – February 25. New and gently used children’s books are being accepted. Bins are located at the Clarke Forum, Waidner-Spahr Library and the Whistlestop Bookshop (Whistlestop is offering a 10% discount on books being donated for this drive.)

klass6_headshotBiography (provided by the speaker)

Perri Klass, MD, is professor of journalism and pediatrics at New York University, where she is director of the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. She attended Harvard Medical School and completed her residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital, Boston. She has received numerous awards for her work as a pediatrician and educator; including the 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics Education Award, which recognizes her educational contributions which have had a broad and positive impact on the health and well-being of children and the 2011 Alvarez Award from the American Medical Writers Association.

Klass has written extensively about medicine, children, literacy, and knitting. Her nonfiction includes Every Mother is a Daughter: the Neverending Quest for Success, Inner Peace, and a Really Clean Kitchen, which she coauthored with her mother, and Quirky Kids: Understanding and Helping Your Child Who Doesn’t Fit In, which she coauthored with Eileen Costello, M.D. She is also the author of two books about medical training, A Not Entirely Benign Procedure: Four Years as a Medical Student, and Baby Doctor: A Pediatrician’s Training, which were reissued in updated editions in 2010. Her most recent books are Treatment Kind and Fair: Letters to a Young Doctor, and The Mercy Rule, a novel, which appeared in 2008.  For five years, she wrote the monthly “18 and Under” column for the Science Section of the New York Times.

Klass is the National Medical Director of Reach Out and Read, a national program that incorporates books and literacy promotion into pediatric primary care visits, encouraging parent-child interaction through reading aloud.  The program serves over 4.5 million children and families every year through more than 5600 clinical sites. Through her work at the ROR National Center she has trained thousands of medical providers in the ROR strategies of early literacy promotion.  She serves on the Academic Pediatric Association’s Task Force on Child Poverty.

Related Links

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/13/poverty-as-a-childhood-disease/

http://www.academicpedsjnl.net/article/S1876-2859(13)00006-5/abstract

http://www.academicpeds.org/public_policy/pdf/APA_Task_Force_Strategic_Road_Mapver3.pdf

John Englander ’72

Englander PosterOceanographer

Melting Ice, Rising Seas, Shifting Shorelines…The New Reality

Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Sea level rise is now unstoppable. Englander will explain the latest science, put sea level rise into historic perspective, and explain what we can expect and how we should plan for the future.

A book sale and signing will follow the presentation.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, the Center for Sustainability Education and the departments of earth sciences, biology, international business and management, international studies and policy studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

John Englander PhotoBiography (provided by the speaker)

John Englander is an oceanographer, consultant and leading expert on sea level rise. He brings the diverse points of view of an industry scientist, entrepreneur and CEO to this critical issue. For over 30 years, he has been a leader in both the private sector and the non-profit arena, serving as CEO for such noteworthy organizations as The Cousteau Society and The International SeaKeepers Society.

Englander graduated Dickinson College with a double major in geology and economics. His bestselling book, High Tide On Main Street: Rising Sea Level and the Coming Coastal Crisis, clearly explains the science, the impending devastating economic and social impacts and the opportunity to design for a more resilient future.

As a consultant Englander works with businesses and government agencies to understand the financial risks of sea level rise and the need for “intelligent adaptation.”  He has briefed Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Congress, major ports, and foreign governments on the long-term national security issues posed by rising sea levels. In 2015 he was appointed as the founding president of a nonprofit organization, the International Sea Level Institute now under development.

He is an in demand speaker and media expert with appearances on MSNBC, Fox Business, ABC, PBS, The Weather Channel,  CBC (Canada), Al Jazeera America, NPR, CCTV (China), and SkyNews TV (UK). He is a fellow of the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST), a fellow of the Explorers Club, a research fellow at the Institute of Marine Sciences – UC-Santa Cruz, and a member of several professional societies.

Video of the Lecture

Emma Kaufman

Kaufman PosterResearcher, University of Oxford Border Criminologies Project

Prisons Built to Expel

Monday, February 15, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Kaufman will examine the rise and consequences of the “all-foreign” prison in the U.S. Is it legal to segregate American prisons by citizenship status? How are non-citizens treated inside prison systems in the US and Europe? What can we learn—about punishment, ethics, and immigration policy—by studying prisons that are built to expel?

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

BiogKaufman photoraphy (provided by the speaker)

Emma Kaufman received her J.D. from Yale and her Ph.D. from Oxford, where she was a Marshall and Clarendon Scholar. Her new book, Punish and Expel, draws on a year of research inside men’s prisons to examine the treatment of incarcerated non-citizens. Emma has published articles on American immigration imprisonment, the relationship between gender and punishment, and British prison policy.

 

Lennard Davis – “Morgan Lecturer”

Davis Final PosterDistinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Professor of English, Disability and Human Development, and Medical Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Morgan Lecture

The Americans with Disabilities Act:  Civil Rights Then, Now, and in the Future

Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

The Americans with Disabilities Act recently reached its 25th year anniversary.  This lecture looks at the history of how the most encompassing civil rights act of the 20th century, affecting the largest US minority, came to be passed; what its effects were and are; and what more work remains to be done. A book sale and signing will follow.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the Department of History.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Disability and the Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

lennarddavisBiography (provided by the speaker)

Lennard J. Davis is a Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and teaches in the English Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he had also served as the department’s Head.  In addition, he is a professor of disability and human development in the School of Applied Health Sciences of the University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as a professor of medical education in the College of Medicine.  He is also the director of Project Biocultures, a think-tank devoted to issues around the intersection of culture, medicine, disability, biotechnology and the biosphere.

Davis is the author of two works on the novel–Factual Fictions: The Origins of the English Novel (Columbia U. Press, 1983, rpt. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996) and Resisting Novels: Fiction and Ideology (Routledge, 1987, rpt. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001) and co-editor of Left Politics and the Literary Profession.

His works on disability include Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body (Verso, 1995), which won the 1996 Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights’ annual award for the best scholarship on the subject of intolerance in North America, and The Disability Studies Reader (4th Ed., Routledge, 2013).  His memoir My Sense of Silence (University of Illinois Press, 2000), was chosen as the Editor’s Choice Book for the Chicago Tribune, selected for the National Book Award for 2000, and nominated for the Book Critics Circle Award for 2000. He has appeared on National Public Radio’s Fresh Air to discuss the memoir, which describes his childhood in a deaf family.  Davis has also edited his parents’ correspondence Shall I Say a Kiss: The Courtship Letters of a Deaf Couple, 1936-38 (Gallaudet University Press, 1999).   Davis is a co-founder of the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession, and he serves on the board of several academic journals.

Having written widely for newspapers and magazines, Davis is also the author of a novel entitled The Sonnets (State University of New York Press, March 2001).  A collection of his essays entitled Bending Over Backwards: Disability, Dismodernism, and Other Difficult Positions was published by New York University Press in August 2002.  He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002-2003 for Obsession: A History (University of Chicago Press, 2008). His book Go Ask Your Father: One Man’s Obsession with Finding his Origins Through DNA Testing was published by Random House in 2009. His most recent book The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era was published in 2013 by University of Michigan Press.  His forthcoming book on the Americans With Disabilities Act will be published on the 25th anniversary of the Act by Beacon Press. Davis edits the Routledge Series Integrating Science and Culture.

He has written numerous articles in The Nation, The New York Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Chronicle of Higher Education and other print media.  Davis has also been a commentator on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered, and appeared on Morning Edition, This American Life, Odyssey, The Leonard Lopate Show and other NPR affiliates.  His current interests include disability-related issues; literary and cultural theory; genetics, race, identity; and biocultural issues.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber, Kay Redfield Jamison and Patricia Hill Collins.

Video of the Lecture

 

Sandra L. Steiner Ball ’84 – “Wesley Lecturer”

SteinerBallPosterBishop, West Virginia Conference of the United Methodist Church

Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Wesley Lecture

We Are More Than We Have Become:

John Wesley’s Call to Holiness and Service

In this lecture, the first woman bishop of the United Methodist Church’s West Virginia Conference, Sandra Steiner Ball, will address Wesley’s desire to reform the Church and to move women and men from a passive connection with the Divine, to an active, relational, and accountable life of holiness and service to God. This subject is relevant for today as it was in the 18th Century.

This lecture is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Center for Service, Spirituality and Social Justice, and the Office of the President, and co-sponsored by the Department of Religion, Women’s and Gender Resource Center, Dickinson Christian Fellowship and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

BishopSteinerBallBiography (provided by the speaker)

Sandra L. Steiner Ball, the daughter of Edward J. and Marjorie W. Steiner, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts and raised in Milford, Delaware. She is a graduate of Dickinson College, (B.A. in Religion, 1984), Duke Divinity School (M.Div., 1987), and Wesley Theological Seminary (D.Min., 2003).

Steiner Ball was ordained an elder in the Peninsula-Delaware Conference in 1989 and has served as an Associate pastor, Sr. Pastor, District Superintendent, Director of Connectional Ministries, and New Church Start pastor. She was elected as a Bishop in the Northeast Jurisdiction in 2012 and assigned to the West Virginia episcopal area.

Steiner Ball has served the general church in a variety of areas, including the Interjurisdictional Episcopacy Committee, the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry, the United Methodist Endorsing Agency, and the Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy.

Bishop Steiner Ball and her husband, The Rev. Barry D. Steiner Ball, have two daughters: Sarah Elizabeth and Sandra Rebekah.

Relevant Links

John Wesley’s Sermon 45 – The New Birth

John Wesley’s Plain Account of Christian Perfection

General Rules of the Methodist Church

Our Wesleyan Heritage

John Wesley’s Sermons Dealing with the Sermon on the Mount

The Wesley Lecture
The Wesley Lecture grows out of the historical relationship between Dickinson College and the Methodist Church, a relationship that has its roots in the 19th century. The lecture highlights contemporary conversations and controversies in faith communities and in higher education about the importance and role of community, commitment, and service for the education of the citizen-scholar.

Video of the Lecture

Zach Leverenz ’01

Leverenz Final PosterFounder and CEO, EveryoneOn

Wednesday, February 3, 2016
Allison Great Hall, 7 p.m.
(Reception to follow)

Launch for New Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship (SINE) Certificate

Business as Unusual: Shared Strategies for Accelerating Change

Leverenz will apply a practitioner’s lens to examine how social entrepreneurs can design shared-value strategies and build cross-sector partnerships that accelerate social impact with immediate scale and sustained success.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship (SINE) Certificate Program, and the Office of Provost and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. This program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

IMG_1611Biography (provided by the speaker)

Zach Leverenz serves as founder and CEO of EveryoneOn, and has led the growth of the organization into a national force for social impact and inclusion.

With a singular focus on providing access to opportunity for all, the organization has adopted a broad, integrative agenda that harnesses the collective expertise and scale of more than 250 cross-sector partners to accelerate meaningful technology adoption for all segments of the unconnected population, including students, families, adults, and seniors.

Through the work of EveryoneOn, Leverenz has become a recognized voice for delivering immediate and practical solutions to the digital divide with unprecedented scale. His work has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Forbes, and the Wall Street Journal, among other national media outlets, and he has been a speaker at technology leadership forums, including SXSW EDU, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), The Washington Post Live, and Discovery Education. The organization’s has also been selected as the national non-profit lead on ConnectED and ConnectHome, two White House initiatives focused on closing the digital divide for low-income Americans and students.

Previously, Leverenz served as the CEO of Middle East Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow (MEET), a MIT-based technology and social justice organization, and led the PeacePlayers International organization in Northern Ireland,South Africa, Cyprus, and New Orleans, LA.

He received a B.A. in English from Dickinson College and an Ed.M from Harvard University, where he was selected as a Reynolds Fellow in Social Entrepreneurship by Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership. He has also been selected as a delegate to the Academy of Achievement and the 2015 United Nations Media for Social Impact Summit. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for MIT-MEET.

LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/zachleverenz

Related Links

Forbes article on Zach & EO shared-value model: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ashoka/2013/12/23/4-innovators-using-civic-consumption-to-change-the-world/

OpEd by Zach in Huffington re: collaborative impact & EveryoneOn-Google Fiber model: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zach-leverenz/collaborating-to-connect_b_7018166.html

Dickinson’s New Social Innovation and Enterpreneurship (SINE) Certificate
Dickinson’s new certificate in social innovation and entrepreneurship (SINE) is about change and creating pathways for student-led change in our world. The college was founded on the premise of educating leaders for our new democracy when the country was in its infancy, and the college continues this important mission of educating leaders for the future. The SINE certificate was developed to focus this effort by highlighting the critical thinking skills, creative mindset, and organizational development capabilities associated with positive change in our society and on behalf of our natural environment. The certificate builds on the college’s educational pillars of interdisciplinarity, global studies and sustainability. And, it captures the enthusiasm and energy our students are already exhibiting in multiple co-curricular activities and student organizations.

Video/Audio of the Lecture

 

Doris Fuller

Doris Fuller PosterTreatment Advocacy Center, Arlington, VA

The New Asylums: Mentally Ill and Behind Bars

Thursday, November 5, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

In the 1930s, barely one in 100 jail inmates had a serious mental illness. Today, the most conservative estimates are one in five jail inmates and even more of the prison population. With video, personal story and professional insight, Fuller will discuss the role of mental illness in turning the U.S. into the world leader in incarceration and discuss practical measures to curb this trend.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Division of Student Life, health studies and the department of psychology. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States. 

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Doris-Fuller-SeriousDoris A. Fuller is chief of research and public affairs, where she conducts and directs the Treatment Advocacy Center’s original studies abd research-driven communications, including public education related to mental illness.

Fuller has co-authored several recent studies from the Treatment Advocacy Center, including:

She also co-directed the organization’s documentary short, “Mental Illness on Trial” and other video productions.

A frequent guest on national TV and radio, often quoted in print and author of many timely op-eds, Fuller is an author of books, former award-winning journalist and mother of a daughter who experienced a first psychotic break as a college student. Doris described her daughter’s struggles with severe mental illness and March 2015 suicide in a feature for the Washington Post, “How the ‘Demons’ Took My Daughter,” which has been read by millions of readers worldwide.

Doris joined the Treatment Advocacy Center in 2010 as director of communications and subsequently served as executive director for three years before being named to found and build the organization’s new Office of Research and Public Affairs.

Video of the Lecture

Nikki Jones

Nikki Jones Final PosterUniversity of California, Berkeley

How Things Fall Apart: Race and Suspicion in Police-Civilian Encounters

Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Drawing on years of field research among Black residents in urban neighborhoods, interviews with police, and videorecordings of police-civilian encounters, sociologist Nikki Jones illustrates how race, suspicion and bias shape the earliest moments of such encounters. She will also share findings from her research which reveals key interactional adjustments that could be used to improve the quality of police encounters with the public.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of women’s and gender studies, educational studies, policy studies, and sociology. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States, and its Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

_EmilyKiyomiPhotography 06172Biography (Link to UC Berkeley Web site)

Nikki Jones is an associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also a faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Her areas of expertise include urban ethnography, race and ethnic relations and criminology and criminal justice, with a special emphasis on the intersection of race, gender, and justice. Professor Jones has published three books, including the sole-authored Between Good and Ghetto: African American Girls and Inner City Violence (2010), published in the Rutgers University Press Series in Childhood Studies (betweengoodandghetto.com). Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals in sociology, gender studies, and criminology. Jones’ next book, based on several years of field research in a San Francisco neighborhood, examines how African American men with criminal histories change their lives, and their place in the neighborhood once they do. Her current research draws on the systematic analysis of video records that document routine encounters between police and civilians, including young Black men’s frequent encounters with the police. Professor Jones is the past-Chair of the American Sociological Association’s Race, Gender and Class Section (2012-13). She also serves on the editorial boards of the Contexts and Feminist Criminology. Jones has received awards for her research and publications including the William T. Grant Award for Early Career Scholars (2007-12) and the New Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Women and Crime (2010) and Division on People of Color and Crime (2009). Before joining the faculty at Cal Professor Jones was on faculty in the Department of Sociology at UC-Santa Barbara (from 2004-2013). She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology and Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Video of the Lecture

Interview with Clarke Forum Student Project Manager Rehoboth Gesese ’17

John Geer

GeerPosterVanderbilt University

The Bruce R. Andrews Lecture

Attacking Democracy

Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

Conventional wisdom says negative political attacks undermine democracy. This lecture will argue, instead, that “attack politics” advance democratic governance.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Bruce R. Andrews Fund and the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

John G. Geer is vice provost for Academic and Strategic Affairs at Vanderbilt University, interim dean of the Graduate School, and the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Political Science.  He earned his Ph.D. in 1986 from Princeton University.  Geer is past editor of The Journal of Politics. Geer has published widely on campaigns, elections, and public opinion.  He is author of In Defense of Negativity: Attack Ads in Presidential Campaigns, which won Harvard University’s Goldsmith Prize in 2008.  Geer has recently published the third edition of Gateways to Democracy (2015).  He has provided extensive commentary in the news media about American politics, including live nationwide interviews for FOX, CNN, NBC, CBS, MSNBC, ABC, and NPR.  Geer has also written numerous op-ed pieces for Politico, The Washington Post, LA Times, USA Today, and Chicago Tribune.  His lecturing has earned him a number of awards at Vanderbilt, including the “Squirrel Award,” the 2004 Birkby Prize, the 2005 Jeffrey Nordhaus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the 2009 the Ellen Gregg Ingalls Award for Excellence in Classroom Teaching, and the 2014 Vanderbilt Alumni Education Award.  He is also co-director of the Vanderbilt Poll.

The Bruce R. Andrews Lecture
Until he passed away on January 8, 2005 Bruce R. Andrews was Robert Blaine Weaver Professor Emeritus of Political Science. Bruce taught at Dickinson from 1960 until his retirement in 1992. Recipient of The John J. Curley and Ann Conser Curley Faculty Chair in 2003, Bruce was one of the college’s most distinguished and influential professors in the last 50 years. Bruce was loved and respected by students, colleagues on the faculty and staff, and many friends he and his wife Margery and children Stephen, Mary-Margaret and Carolyn had and have in the Carlisle community. His warm and engaging personality, deep knowledge of American politics, commitment to the liberal arts and active role as a citizen brightened and informed everything he did at Dickinson. As a living memorial to the example Professor Andrews set as a teacher, mentor and friend, those who knew him have endowed the Bruce R. Andrews Fund to continue the kind of vibrant discussion of politics and public life to which Bruce devoted his life.

 

Video of the Lecture

Interview with John Geer by Sam Weisman ’18

 

Steven Strogatz – “Joseph Priestley Award Recipient”

Strogatz PosterCornell University

Joseph Priestley Award Celebration Lecture

Synchronization in Nature

Monday, October 12, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Strogatz will discuss spectacular examples of synchronization in nature, from rhythmically flashing fireflies to crowds of pedestrians that inadvertently caused London’s Millennium Bridge to wobble on its opening day.

The Joseph Priestley Award recipient is chosen by a different science department each year.  The Department of Physics and Astronomy has selected this year’s recipient, Steven Strogatz. The event is supported by the College’s Priestley Fund and is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Student Senate and the Churchill Fund  and co-sponsored by the departments of physics and astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, environmental studies, math & computer science, and psychology.

Photo Credit: John GrooBiography (provided by the speaker)

Steven Strogatz is the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University. He works in the areas of nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, often on topics inspired by the curiosities of everyday life. He studied at Princeton, Cambridge, and Harvard and taught at MIT before moving to Cornell in 1994. A renowned teacher and one of the world’s most highly cited mathematicians, he has blogged about math for the New York Times and has been a frequent guest on RadioLab. His honors include a Presidential Young Investigator Award; MIT’s highest teaching prize; a lifetime achievement award for the communication of mathematics to the general public; the Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science; and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, Sync, and The Calculus of Friendship. His latest book, The Joy of x, has been translated into 15 languages.

Joseph Priestley Lecture
The Priestley Award is presented by Dickinson College in memory of Joseph Priestley, discoverer of oxygen, to a distinguished scientist whose work has contributed to the welfare of humanity. The Priestley Award, first presented in 1952, recognizes outstanding achievement and contribution to our understanding of science and the world.

Video of the Lecture

 

Patricia Hill Collins – “Morgan Lecturer”

PHC Final PosterUniversity of Maryland

Intersectionality, Black Youth and Political Activism

Thursday, October 1, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.

Live Stream Link

This talk examines how intersectional frameworks shed light on new directions for anti-racist activism, especially among African American youth.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Morgan Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund, Division of Student Life, the departments of sociology, women’s and gender studies, Africana studies, American studies, anthropology, English, history,  philosophy, and political science. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s semester theme, Inequality and Mass Incarceration in the United States and the Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

PatriciaHillCollins_2014 Head ShotBiography (provided by the speaker)

Patricia Hill Collins is Distinguished University Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park and Charles Phelps Taft Emeritus Professor of Sociology within the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Cincinnati. Her award-winning books include Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment (1990, 2000) which received both the Jessie Bernard Award of the American Sociological Association (ASA) and the C. Wright Mills Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems; and Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism (2004) which received ASA’s 2007 Distinguished Publication Award. She is also author of Fighting Words: Black Women and the Search for Justice (1998); From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism (2005); Another Kind of Public Education: Race, Schools, the Media, and Democratic Possibilities (2009); The Handbook of Race and Ethnic Studies (2010) edited with John Solomos; and On Intellectual Activism (2013). Her anthology Race, Class, and Gender: An Anthology, 9th edition (2015), edited with Margaret Andersen, is widely used in undergraduate classrooms in over 200 colleges and universities.

Professor Collins has taught at several institutions, held editorial positions with professional journals, lectured widely in the United States and internationally, served in many capacities in professional organizations, and has acted as consultant for a number of community organizations. In 2008, she became the 100th President of the American Sociological Association, the first African American woman elected to this position in the organization’s 104-year history. Her next book, Intersectionality, co-authored with Sirma Bilge, will be published in 2016 as part of Polity Press’s Key Concepts Series.

Morgan Lectureship
The Morgan Lectureship was endowed by the board of trustees in 1992, in grateful appreciation for the distinguished service of James Henry Morgan of the Class of 1878, professor of Greek, dean, and president of the College. The lectureship brings to campus a scholar in residence to meet informally with individuals and class groups, and to deliver the Morgan Lecture on topics in the social sciences and humanities. Recent scholars have been Jorge Luis Borges, Francis Fukuyama, Michael Ignatieff, Samantha Power, Art Spiegelman, Sandra Steingraber and Kay Redfield Jamison.

Video of the Lecture

Anthony Ingraffea

Ingraffea PosterCornell University

Shale Gas and Oil Development: Latest Evidence on Leaky Wells, Methane Emissions, and Energy Policy

Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.
(360 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA)

Ingraffea will discuss the myths and realities concerning large-scale development of unconventional natural gas/oil resources in shale deposits on both a local and global scale.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund,  Center for Sustainability Education, department of environmental studies and Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM). The program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s  Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Dr Ingraffea_ithaca fallsBiography (provided by the speaker)

Dr. Ingraffea is the Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering Emeritus and a Weiss Presidential Teaching Fellow at Cornell University where he has been since 1977. He holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado. Dr. Ingraffea’s research concentrates on computer simulation and physical testing of complex fracturing processes. He and his students performed pioneering research in the use of interactive computer graphics and realistic representational methods in computational fracture mechanics. He has authored with his students and research associates over 250 papers in these areas, and is director of the Cornell Fracture Group (www.cfg.cornell.edu). Since 1977, he has been a principal or co-principal investigator on over $36M in R&D projects from the NSF, EXXON, NASA Langley, Nichols Research, NASA Glenn, AFOSR, FAA, Kodak, U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Transportation, IBM, Schlumberger, Gas Technology Institute, Sandia National Laboratories, the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers, General Dynamics, Boeing, Caterpillar Tractor, DARPA, and Northrop Grumman. Professor Ingraffea was a member of the first group of Presidential Young Investigators named by the National Science Foundation in 1984. For his research achievements in hydraulic fracturing he has won the International Association for Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics “1994 Significant Paper Award”, and he has twice won the National Research Council/U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics Award for Research in Rock Mechanics (1978, 1991). He became a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1991, and named the Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering at Cornell in 1992.   His group won a NASA Group Achievement Award in 1996, and a NASA Aviation Safety /Turning Goals into Reality Award in 1999 for its work on the aging aircraft problem. He became co-dditor-in-chief of Engineering Fracture Mechanics in 2005. In 2006, he won ASTM’s George Irwin Medal for outstanding research in fracture mechanics, and in 2009 was named a Fellow of the International Congress on Fracture. TIME Magazine named him one of its “People Who Mattered” in 2011, and he became the first president of Physicians, Scientists, and Engineers for Healthy Energy, Inc. (www.psehealthyenergy.org) in that same year. He is a co-author of recent papers on wellbore integrity in Pennsylvania (2014), and on conversion of New York (2012) and California (2014) to wind/sun/water power for all energy uses in the next few decades.

Video of the Lecture

Rush Holt

Final Holt PosterAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

The Glover Memorial Lecture
Advancing Science

Wednesday, September 9, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS), 7 p.m.
(360 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA)

Science is, as physician and essayist Lewis Thomas wrote, the “shrewdest maneuver” for discovering the world. Asking questions that can be answered empirically and engaging in open communication so that others can collectively review and verify possible answers lead to the most reliable knowledge—a knowledge that is powerfully applicable in daily life. To thrive, however, science needs the support of the society it serves, and that support must be cultivated.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and the Glover Memorial Lecture Fund and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and the departments of physics, policy studies and political Science. This program is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Rush D. Holt, Ph.D., became the 18th chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of the Science family of journals in February 2015. In this role, Holt leads the world’s largest multi-disciplinary scientific and engineering society.

Over his long career, Dr. Holt has held positions as a teacher, scientist, administrator, and policymaker. From 1987 to 1998, Holt was assistant director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), a Department of Energy national lab, which is the largest research facility of Princeton University and one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country. At PPPL, Holt helped establish the lab’s nationally renowned science education program. From 1980 to 1988, Holt served on the faculty of Swarthmore College, where he taught courses in physics and public policy. In 1982, he took leave from Swarthmore to serve as an AAAS/American Physical Society Science and Technology Policy Fellow on Capitol Hill. The Fellowships program, dating to 1973, places outstanding scientists and engineers in executive, legislative, and Congressional branch assignments for one or two years; by early 2015, the program had served nearly 3,000 alumni working worldwide in the policy, academic, industry, and nonprofit realms. Holt has said that his AAAS S&T Policy Fellowship was “life changing,” and served as a springboard to his role in Congress. He also served as an arms control expert at the U.S. State Department, where he monitored the nuclear programs of countries such as Iraq, Iran, North Korea, and the former Soviet Union. In 1981, Holt was issued a patent for an improved solar-pond technology for harnessing energy from sunlight.

Before coming to AAAS, Holt served for 16 years as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. In Congress, Holt served as a senior member of the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. On Capitol Hill, Holt established a long track record of advocacy for federal investment in research and development, science education, and innovation. He served on the National Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics and Science (known as the Glenn Commission), founded the Congressional Research and Development Caucus, and served as a co-chair of the Biomedical Research Caucus. Holt served eight years on the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and, from 2007 to 2010, chaired the Select Intelligence Oversight Panel, which worked to strengthen legislative oversight of the intelligence community. His legislative work earned him numerous accolades, including being named one of Scientific American magazine’s “50 National Visionaries Contributing to a Brighter Technological Future” and a “Champion of Science” by the Science Coalition. He has also received awards from the American Chemical Society, the American Association of University Professors, the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Council of Scientific Society Presidents, the American Geophysical Union, and the Biotechnology Industry Organization. Holt is also a past recipient of two of AAAS’ highest honors: the William D. Carey Lectureship Award (2005) and the Philip Hauge Abelson Award (2010).

From December 2014 to February 2015, Holt was appointed a Director’s Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

Holt is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from New York University. He is an elected fellow of AAAS, the American Physical Society, and Sigma Xi, and he holds honorary degrees from Monmouth University, Rider University, and Thomas Edison State College. He is married to Margaret Lancefield, a physician, and they have three children and seven grandchildren.

The Glover Memorial Lecture

The Glover Memorial Lectures are usually presented in alternate years. This lectureship in science was established in 1958 in memory of John Glover of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, the inventor of the Glover Tower, and in memory of his son and grandson, Henry and Lester Glover, by the late Dr. John D. Yeagley and Mrs. Yeagley of York, Pennsylvania. Recent Glover Lectures include Peter Brancazio’s “Sports on the Moon,” Clint Sprott on “The New Science of Chaos,” Dr. Dorrit Hoffleit’s presentation on “A Century of Women in Astronomy,” Lawrence Krauss’ lecture on “The Physics of Star Trek,” Albert Bartlett’s lecture on “Arithmetic, Population, and Energy,” and David Lee’s lecture on “Superconductivity and Superfluidity: A Century of Discovery.”

Video of the Lecture

Sean Maloney

Maloney posterFormer Executive Vice President of Intel Corporation

Life’s Challenges

Monday, March 2, 2015
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Livestream

Maloney will discuss the challenges that Intel and the Silicon Valley high-tech industry overcame during its formative period, the challenges China currently poses to the semiconductor sector of the U.S. economy, the challenges of revolutionizing the health care industry through the application of new technologies, as well as his own personal challenges as a stroke survivor.

This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Sean_MaloneyBiography

Sean Maloney is a former executive vice president of Intel Corporation, general manager of the Sales and Marketing Group, and chief sales and marketing officer. He had been with Intel since 1982. During his tenure he was Andy Grove’s chief of staff, and successfully led the growth of Intel into the Chinese and Asian markets. He was the chairman of Intel China from May 2011 until he retired from Intel in Jan 2013.

Related Links
Heart Across AmericaWall Street Journal
Intel Official
Anatomy of a Comeback: The Sean Maloney Story

Lecture Video

Judge John E. Jones III ’77

Jones PosterU.S. Judge for the Middle District of Pennsylvania

Blindfolds Off: How Judges Decide

Tuesday, December 2, 2014 
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Link to Live Stream

A conversation with Judge Jones, U.S. District judge for the Middle District of Pennsylvania and a Dickinson trustee, about the nature of judging and the role that judges play in American political, social, cultural, and economic life.  Gary Gildin, interim dean and professor of law, The Dickinson School of Law of Penn State University, and Harry Pohlman, professor of political science, Dickinson College, will participate in the discussion.

The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues,  Student Senate and Penn State Dickinson School of Law and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #clarkeforum and #howjudgesdecide.

 Biography 

Independent from the Ground Up – Video and Dickinson Magazine Article about Judge Jones

Jones_John '77Judge John E. Jones III commenced his service as a United States District Judge on August 2, 2002. He is the 21st judge to sit in the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Judge Jones was appointed to his current position by President George W. Bush in February 2002, and was unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate on July 30, 2002.

Judge Jones was born and raised in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. He is a graduate of the Mercersburg Academy, Dickinson College, and The Dickinson School of Law of The Pennsylvania State University.

In 1980 Judge Jones began his legal career as a law clerk to the President Judge of Schuylkill County, the Honorable Guy A. Bowe. Subsequently, he engaged in the private practice of law in Pottsville, Pennsylvania until the time of his elevation to the federal bench.

In November, 1994, Pennsylvania Governor-elect Tom Ridge named Judge Jones as a co-chair of his transition team. Subsequently, in May 1995 Governor Ridge nominated Judge Jones to serve as Chairman of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control  Board.

In 2006 Judge Jones received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the Dickinson School of Law, as well as an honorary doctorate in law and public policy from Dickinson College, where he was recognized as one of the twenty five most influential graduates in the College’s over two hundred and twenty year history. In 2009, the College’s faculty voted to induct Judge Jones into its Phi Beta Kappa chapter. In 2007 he received an honorary doctorate in law from Muhlenberg College. In May, 2006 Judge Jones was named by Time Magazine as one of its Time 100, the one hundred most influential people in the world. Judge Jones has also received a Rave Award for Policy from Wired Magazine. In 2006 Judge Jones was the recipient of the first John Marshall Judicial Independence Award, given by the Pennsylvania Bar Association. In 2009 Judge Jones was the recipient of the Geological Society of America’s 2009 President’s Medal, and in the same year was inducted into the George Washington Spirit Society.

In 2005 the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania appointed Judge Jones to the Pennsylvania Commission on Judicial Independence. In 2013 Chief Justice John Roberts appointed Judge Jones to the Committee on Judicial Security, a standing committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States.

Judge Jones is a member of the Board of Trustees of his alma mater, Dickinson College. He also serves as a member of the Board of Regents of the Mercersburg Academy, and the Board of Counselors of The Dickinson School of Law of the Penn State University, where he also serves as an adjunct professor of law.

Judge Jones has presided over several noteworthy and high profile cases. In 2003 Judge Jones struck down portions of Shippensburg University’s speech code on the basis that they violated the First Amendment’s free speech guarantee. In that same year Judge Jones ruled, in a decision later affirmed by the United States Supreme Court, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s statute assessing milk producers in order to fund advertising, including the Milk Mustache/got milk® campaign did not infringe the free speech rights of the producers. In 2005 Judge Jones presided over the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover School District, after which he held that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum. In 2006 he ruled that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s ballot access procedures for minor political parties did not violate the Constitution. In 2014 Judge Jones resolved the matter of Whitewood v. Wolf by striking down as unconstitutional Pennsylvania’s ban on same-sex marriage.

In 2007 Judge Jones and the Kitzmiller case were featured in the two-hour Nova special “Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial,” televised nationally by PBS. In April 2008 “Judgment Day” won a Peabody Award, which is the oldest and most distinguished honor in electronic media. Judge Jones has also appeared as a guest on national television shows and networks such as Today on NBC, the NewsHour on PBS, C-SPAN’s America & The Courts, CNN, and locally on the Pennsylvania Cable Network.

Judge Jones resides in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. He has been married to his wife Beth Ann since 1982. They are the proud parents of daughter Meghan and son John, and delighted grandparents of Carys Bryn Prock.

Video of the Discussion

Kate Martin – Constitution Day Address Lecturer

Director, Center for National Security Studies

Government SurveillMartin Final Posterance and the Bill of Rights

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

A former senior counter-terrorism official has said that existing surveillance capabilities are creating “the potential for a police state.” This lecture will address whether and how such capabilities can be reconciled with the Constitution’s prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures, its protections for freedom of speech and religion, as well as the demands of an open government in a democracy.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State Dickinson School of Law, and co-sponsored by the Churchill Fund and with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Project on Civilian-Military Educational Cooperation. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

kate_martinBiography (provided by the speaker)

Kate Martin serves as director of the Center for National Security Studies, in Washington, D.C., the only think tank and advocacy organization devoted exclusively to preserving civil liberties in the national security context. Martin has served as director since 1992, having joined the Center as director of its Litigation Project in 1988 after 10 years as a lawyer in private practice.

Ms. Martin works to protect freedom of information, combat excessive government secrecy, prevent illegal government surveillance, assure effective oversight of intelligence agencies, protect the right of political dissent and the right to due process, ensure congressional authority in war powers, and protect the free exchange of ideas and information across international borders.

Martin testifies frequently before Congress. She regularly provides expert commentary in the media, appearing, for example, on The PBS News Hour and in-depth discussion shows on National Public Radio. She is regularly quoted in the print media, including The New York Times and the Washington Post. She has also has written extensively on these issues for more than twenty years.

Martin and the Center were awarded the 2005 Eugene S. Pulliam First Amendment Award by the Society for Professional Journalists for “years of working to protect open government and freedoms of speech and the press in the face of adversity in the name of national security.” She was inducted into the Freedom of Information Hall of Fame in 2001.

Martin’s court victories include obtaining an emergency order in 1989 on behalf of the National Security Archive that prevented the destruction of the Reagan White House e-mail messages and forcing the historic release of the intelligence budgets for 1997 and 1998 on behalf of the Federation of American Scientists.   After the attacks of September 11, she led the coalition challenge to the Justice Department’s extraordinary policy of arresting hundreds of people in secret and then deporting them after secret immigration hearings.

From 1993 to 2002, Martin worked in emerging democracies, with NGOs in Eastern Europe and Latin America to secure freedom of information and assist in establishing oversight and accountability of secret intelligence agencies. She was co-director with the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights in Warsaw of such a reform project in 12 former communist countries in Europe.

From 1995 to 2001, she also served as general counsel to the National Security Archive, a research library located at George Washington University. Martin has taught Strategic Intelligence and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law School and National Security Law at George Washington University. She is a member of the Liberty and Security Committee of The Constitution Project and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy.

Before joining the Center, Martin was a partner with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Nussbaum, Owen & Webster. She graduated from the University of Virginia Law School, where she was a member of the Law Review, and from Pomona College with a B.A. in philosophy cum laude.

Related Links:
For more writings about government surveillance:
http://cnss.org/pages/surveillance-cnss-work-on-surveillance-148.html
For government statements and disclosures: http://icontherecord.tumblr.com/

Winfield C. Cook Constitution Day Address
The annual address is endowed through the generosity of Winfield C. Cook, former Dickinson Trustee. Each year the Clarke Forum invites a prominent public figure to campus to speak on a contemporary issue related to the Constitution. The event celebrates the signing of the United States Constitution and commemorates Dickinson’s connection to that document, through John Dickinson’s participation as an original signer. Previous speakers have included Kenneth Starr, Ira Glasser, Lowell Weicker, Marjorie Rendell, Tom Ridge and Michael Chertoff.

Interview with Kate Martin



Video of the Lecture