Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty

The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues is establishing a series of programmatic events dedicated to the theme of leadership in an age of uncertainty. This new initiative is grounded on the reality that today’s generation of Dickinson students confronts a large number of intractable political, economic, and social problems: terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental pollution, global warming, a sustainable energy policy, the ongoing financial crisis, the federal deficit, the amount of public and private debt, the health care crisis, along with issues regarding race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as technology and privacy. These issues and problems directly or indirectly pose challenges to the College and the local community that may in time require fundamental changes in institutions, values, and practices across the public, private, and non-profit sectors of American society. How Dickinsonians respond to these challenges presents us with an opportunity for reflection on the meaning of leadership in the contemporary world.

Marc Lynch

Associate Professor of Political Science, George Washington University

The Arab Uprisings

Thursday, November 8, 2012
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Book Sale/Signing to Follow

Lynch sheds light on the unfinished Middle East revolutions that have so far brought down the governments of Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya, and offers a framework for understanding the deeper changes still emerging from a region thoroughly and forever altered.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Penn State Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs and co-sponsored by the Constance and Rose Ganoe Memorial Fund for Inspirational Teaching courtesy of Professor Russell Bova and the Department of Middle East Studies.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography(provided by the speaker)

Marc Lynch (@abuaardvark) is associate professor of political science at George Washington University, where he is the director of the Institute for Middle East Studies and the Project on Middle East Political Science. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and edits the Middle East Channel for ForeignPolicy.com. He has written several books including The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East and Voices of the New Arab Public, which was selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Book. He lives in Bethesda, Maryland.

 

Lieutenant General James M. Dubik – “General Omar N. Bradley Lecture”

Leadership Under Pressure

Monday, October 22, 2012
Katz Hall, Penn State Dickinson School of Law, 7:00 p.m.

Link to Live Webcast

General Dubik, The General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership, will discuss the strategic mistakes made in Iraq; the myths that are partly responsible for these mistakes; the transformation that turned Iraq from a strategic failure to a strategic opportunity; and how the U.S. should incorporate its experience in Iraq in addressing current ongoing events in the Middle East and North Africa.

This event is jointly sponsored by Dickinson College, Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs, and the U.S. Army War College.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

The Omar Bradley Chair is a joint initiative among the United States Army War College, Dickinson College and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs. Its objective is to advance the study of strategic leadership and enhance civilian-military dialogue by offering distinguished individuals the opportunity to contribute to the educational and research activities of the partner institutions. Previous chair-holders include former director of national intelligence and retired United States Navy four-star Admiral Dennis Blair and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist Rick Atkinson.

Dubik Named Next Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership

Richard Matthew

Founding Director of the Center for Unconventional Security Affairs & Professor of International and Environmental Politics, UC at Irvine

Natural Resources, Conflict and Peacebuilding

Wednesday, October 10, 2012
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Based on fieldwork in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, this presentation examines the complex and evolving relationships among natural resources, violent conflict and peacebuilding.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Penn State Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs and is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Richard A. Matthew (BA McGill; PhD Princeton) is a professor in the Schools of Social Ecology and Social Science at the University of California at Irvine, and founding director of the Center for Unconventional Security Affairs (www.cusa.uci.edu). He is also a senior fellow at the International Institute for Sustainable Development in Geneva; a senior fellow at the Munk School for International Affairs at the University of Toronto; a senior member of the UNEP Expert Group on Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding; and a member of the World Conservation Union’s Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy. He has carried out fieldwork in conflict zones throughout South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, and has consulted widely with government agencies and the private sector. He has served on several UN missions, including two that he led to Sierra Leone, and he was the lead author of the UN technical report, Sierra Leone: Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding Assessment. He has over 140 publications.

Web links related to the lecture:

http://www.cusa.uci.edu/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btxcAEj3puo

Cheng Li

Director of Research and Senior Fellow, Thornton China Center, Brookings

China’s Leadership Transition & the Bo Xilai Case

Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Just as the Chinese Community Party elite is trying to smooth the way for the transfer of power to a new generation of Chinese leaders, one of its rising stars, Bo Xilai, has been ousted as party chief of Chongqing and his wife is charged with the murder of a British businessman. What are the implications of this unfolding crisis for China’s decision-making process, economic policies, social stability, and foreign relations? More information

The event is jointly sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Penn State Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs and co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Studies.  It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)

Cheng LI is the director of research and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center. Dr. Li currently also serves as a director of the National Committee on US-China Relations, a member of the Academic Advisory Team of the Congressional U.S.-China Working Group, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.  Dr. Li is the author/editor of numerous books, including China’s Leaders: The New Generation, Bridging Minds Across the Pacific: The Sino-U.S. Educational Exchange 1978-2003, China’s Changing Political Landscape: Prospects for Democracy, China’s Emerging Middle Class: Beyond Economic Transformation.

Dr. Li has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights as an expert on China. He recently appeared on CNN, C-SPAN, BBC, ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, NPR Diane Rehm Show, NPR News Hour with Jim Lehrer, and the PBS Charlie Rose Show.

He received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University in 1992.

 

Pat Genovese

Head Lacrosse Coach, William Smith College

Title IX: Conception, Progression, Direction

Monday, September 24, 2012
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7:00 p.m.

In 1972, Congress enacted Title IX, which prohibited sexual discrimination in any education program or activity that received federal financial assistance. Coach Genovese will explore the origin of Title IX; the advances and setbacks that have occurred in athletics since its enactment; and where it will take us in the future.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Department of Athletics, Office of Institutional and Diversity Initiatives, and the Women’s Center. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Pat Genovese’s Biography

Ana Puig

Co-Chair of the Kitchen Table Patriots

The Tea Party

Thursday, April 19, 2012 (originally scheduled for March 1)
Althouse Hall, Room 106, 5:00 p.m.

Reception to Follow

Puig will address the nature of the Tea Party and the impact that it has had in the early Republican primaries and the role she anticipates it will play in the 2012 presidential election.

This event was initiated by The Clarke Forum Student Project Managers and is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Ana Puig’s Biography
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Doug Guthrie

Dean of the School of Business, George Washington University

China’s Capitalism: A Model For U.S.?

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

One of the great ironies of our time is this: today, the largest Communist society in the world is also the world’s most dynamic and business-friendly capitalist economy. To examine this seemingly paradoxical circumstance, this lecture will analyze the economic reforms that have been sweeping across China for over three decades. As we view the changes in China through the prism of media representations, political rhetoric, and the many other distortions that have shaped perceptions of the reform process in China, the picture is murky at best. We will examine the changes that have actually occurred in China and the forces that have brought about this process of change. As it turns out, China’s course of building a market economy can teach the world’s capitalist powers a great deal about healthy market economies.

This event was initiated by The Clarke Forum Student Project Managers and is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Department of Political Science and Department of International Business and Management. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Dr. Doug Guthrie is dean of the George Washington University School of Business and professor of International Business and Professor of Management. He is a recognized expert in the fields of economic reform in China, leadership and corporate governance, and corporate social responsibility.

Prior to joining GW, Dr. Guthrie served as professor of management at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He also held a joint appointment as professor of sociology on NYU’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences and was director of executive education at NYU-Stern from 2007-09.

Dr. Guthrie has held visiting positions at Harvard Business School, INSEAD and the graduate schools of business at Stanford University, Columbia University and Emory University. He served as director of the Business Institutions Initiative at the social Science Research Council (1999-2003) and was the academic director of the Berlin School of Creative Leadership from 2008-11.

He holds an A.B. in East Asian languages and civilizations with a concentration in Chinese literature from the University of Chicago. He earned his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in organizational sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Dr. Guthrie studied in Taipei, Taiwan, during his undergraduate years and conducted his doctoral research in Shanghai, China. Dr. Guthrie has authored, co-authored, and edited numerous books, articles, and reports on Chinese economic reform, leadership, and corporate social responsibility, including Dragon in a Three-Piece Suit: The Emergence of Capitalism in China (Princeton University Press); and China and Globalization: The Economic, Political, and Social Transformation of China (Routledge). His doctoral research was recognized with the American Sociological Association’s national award for the top dissertation in the field in 1997. He has also been the recipient of teaching awards, best paper awards, and grants from the Ford and Sloan Foundations.
Read more about Dr. Guthrie’s books at the following link:
http://business.gwu.edu/dean/publications/.

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Heidi Hartmann

President, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Lifting the Floor and Achieving Gender Equality

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 *
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium, 7:00 p.m

Trends in women’s labor force participation, the gender wage gap, and job segregation by sex indicate that women’s progress has hit a plateau after improvement for several decades. Hartmann will discuss the policies that are needed to lift the floor of the labor market of women, resolve troubling work/family issues, and achieve gender equality between women and men.

The event is co-sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Churchill Fund, the Departments of Economics, Sociology, International Business and Management and the Women’s Center.

* This program is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Heidi Hartmann is the president of the Washington-based Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a scientific research organization that she formed in 1987 to meet the need for women-centered, policy-oriented research. She is an economist with a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics. Dr. Hartmann is also a research professor at The George Washington University.

Dr. Hartmann has published numerous articles in journals and books and her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy, frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress, and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets such as CNN, NBC News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports including: Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still a Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; The Impact of Social Security Reform on Women; Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; and Combining Work and Welfare: An Antipoverty Strategy. She is currently secretary/treasurer of the National Council of Women’s Organizations (NCWO) and co-chair of NCWO’s Task Force on Older Women’s Economic Security (OWES). She has also served as an editor of several scholarly journals and is currently co-editor of the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy and a member of the editorial board of Feminist Economics. She serves on the board of directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Prior to founding IWPR, Dr. Hartmann was on the faculties of Rutgers University and the New School for Social Research and worked at the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences, where she served as associate executive director of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and contributed to numerous reports on women’s employment issues, including Women, Work, and Wages: Equal Pay for Jobs of Equal Value and Computer Chips and Paper Clips: Technology and Women’s Employment.

In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship for her work in the field of women and economics. She is also the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Swarthmore College, the Wilbur Cross Medal for distinguished alumni of the graduate school of Yale University, and an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree from Claremont Graduate University.

Heidi Hartmann 2_28_2012

Charles W. Cole Jr. – “Benjamin Rush Award Lecturer”

Former President and CEO, First Maryland Bankcorp and The National Bank of Maryland

Light at the End of the Tunnel?

Tuesday, February 21, 2012  **
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

Cole will analyze and discuss the state of the U.S. economy from a global perspective, with a special focus on both the strengths and weaknesses of current financial markets, including how they might affect future job opportunities of college graduates. Cole will also have some suggestions regarding the shaping of an investment portfolio.

This program is part of the The Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Charles W. Cole Jr., is a retired Baltimore Banker and Community leader. He was born in Baltimore, son of a lawyer.  Cole is a graduate of Gilman School and Washington and Lee University with a degree in economics and earned his LL.B. from the University of Maryland School of Law.

Mr. Cole spent 34 years with First Maryland Bankcorp and the First National Bank of Maryland. He served as President (1977-1994) and Chief Executive Officer (1984-1994). He was also Chief Administrative Officer and a Director of First Maryland Bankcorp. During the 10 years after Mr. Cole took the helm as CEO, First Maryland’s compounded growth rate exceeded 20% – a record unmatched by the largest 100 bank holding companies in the country.

After retiring from the bank, Mr. Cole was managing Director and Vice Chairman of Brown Advisory. After departing Brown Advisory, Mr. Cole was Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer of Legg Mason Trust (now Legg Mason Investment Council and Trust Company).

Mr. Cole served as trustee of a number of institutions such as the University of Maryland Board of Regents, University of Maryland Baltimore, the University of Maryland Foundation, the Allied Irish Banks of Dublin, Ireland and Provident Bank of Maryland. He was President of the Elkridge Club. He was a member of the Board of the Center Club, the Greater Baltimore Committee, Medical Eye Bank of Maryland, the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, the Maryland Zoological Society, the Governor’s Maryland High Technology Roundtable, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Maryland Institute College of Art and Sinai Hospital.

Mr. Cole was chosen by then-Governor Harry R. Hughes to represent the financial community on the Governor’s initial trade mission to the People’s Republic of China. That visit resulted in the establishment of the first correspondent banking relationship between a Chinese bank and a bank in this region. In 1982, Mr. Cole served as Vice Chairman of the United Way of Central Maryland Campaign. Mr. Cole was awarded the Henry A. Rosenberg, Sr. Distinguished Citizen’s Award, Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America in December, 1992.

Mr. Cole loves investments and serves on the investment committees at the University of Maryland Foundation, Medstar, Sheppard Pratt, Calvert School and Dickinson College, Goldseker, and France-Merrick Foundation.

Mr. Cole, his wife, two daughters and five grandchildren have hiked Tuckerman’s Ravine on Mt Washington in New Hampshire many times and have done extensive trekking in Switzerland for many years.

Mr. Cole’s highest priority in life is a deep devotion to his family. Mr. Cole is delighted to have lived during the time of Ted Williams, John Unitas, Otto Graham, Raymond Berry, Bill Russell, Michael Jordan, Sugar Ray Robinson, Poncho Gonzalez, Bjorn Borg, Rhinehold Messner and Secretariat.

The Benjamin Rush Award
The Benjamin Rush Award for Humanistic Values in Corporate and Government Life, established in 1985, is one of the most prestigious annual awards presented at Dickinson College. The Award celebrates the achievements of officials and executives who have reached the highest levels in government service or the corporate world. It is named in honor of Benjamin Rush, the prominent colonial Philadelphia physician who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and founder of Dickinson.

The Award is conferred at a public ceremony on the Dickinson campus, during which the recipient presents the annual Rush Award Lecture. The lectureship guidelines stipulate that the recipient should comment on issues of significance to government or the corporate world, with some attention to the value of the liberal arts in preparing individuals for responsible citizenship. The recipient of the Award is presented with an honorarium and a bronze medal bearing Rush’s likeness. Prior to the Rush Lecture the college hosts a reception and dinner in honor of the recipient.

 

 

Charles_Cole_2_21_2012

Dennis Blair

Former United States Director of National Intelligence, Commander in Chief of U.S. Pacific Command, and Retired United States Navy Admiral

The Challenges of China

Thursday, November 3, 2011
Stern Center, Great Room, 7:00 p.m.

* This event is part of The Clarke Forum’s series on Leadership in an Age
of Uncertainty.

This event is jointly sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs.

Lecture Description (provided by the speaker)
To outsiders, China seems to be on a roll these days. The 2008 Olympics were an impressive coming-out party; it weathered the 2007-2008 world economic crisis better than most other countries, and has resumed double-digit economic growth; it has shown the world an advanced stealth aircraft, is about to launch an aircraft carrier, and has sent ships to join the international anti-piracy patrol in the Indian Ocean. Yet in many ways China does not act like a powerful, confident country. It squabbles with its neighbors to the East and South; it is in the midst of a mostly secret succession process; Chinese search engines will not accept “jasmine”; labor unrest and inflation are growing. Admiral Blair will describe China’s prospects for development in the future – economic, political, social and military – and will discuss the implications for the United States, and American policies and actions to deal with China.

Biography (provided by the speaker)
Admiral Blair served as director of National Intelligence from January 2009 to May 2010. He led sixteen national intelligence agencies, administering a budget of $50 billion and providing integrated intelligence support to the President, Congress and operations in the field. Prior to rejoining the government, he held the John M. Shalikashvili Chair in National Security Studies with the National Bureau of Asian Research.

From 2003 to 2006, Admiral Blair was president and chief executive officer of the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a federally funded research and development center based in Alexandria, Virginia that supports the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and the Intelligence Community.

Prior to retiring from the Navy in 2002, Admiral Blair served as commander in chief, U.S. Pacific Command, the largest of the combatant commands. During his 34-year Navy career, Admiral Blair served on guided missile destroyers in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets and commanded the Kitty Hawk Battle Group. Ashore, he served as Director of the Joint Staff and held budget and policy positions on the National Security Council and several major Navy staffs.

Admiral Blair currently is a member of the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America’s Future Energy. In the past he has served as a director of Tyco International, EDO Corporation, Iridium, LLC, and as a director of several non-profit organizations.

A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Admiral Blair earned a master’s degree in history and languages from Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar, and was a White House fellow at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He has been awarded four Defense Distinguished Service medals, three National Intelligence Distinguished Service medals, and has received decorations from the governments of Japan, Thailand, Korea, Australia, the Philippines and Taiwan.
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P. J. Crowley – General Omar N. Bradley Lecture

Former United States Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs

General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership

WIKILEAKS: One Year Later

Tuesday, October 25, 2011
Penn State University Dickinson School of Law
Lewis Katz Hall Auditorium, 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Crowley will explore the impact that Wikileaks has had on global politics and the media as well as the implications it has had for relevant national security policies.

This event is jointly sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs, and the U.S. Army War College.

Biography
Philip J. “P.J.” Crowley, former United States assistant secretary of state for public affairs, is the 2011-2012 recipient of the General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership. While in residence, Crowley conducts classes at Dickinson College, the U.S. Army War College and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs.

President Barack Obama nominated Crowley to be assistant secretary of state for public affairs in the U.S. Department of State in 2009. Previously, he served as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director of public affairs for the National Security Council during the Clinton Administration. Across a 30-year government career, Crowley was a 26-year veteran of the United States Air Force and served in Turkey, Germany, and at the United States Air Force Academy. During the Kosovo conflict, he worked under Javier Solana, Secretary General of NATO, helping to develop a strategic communication capability to keep American and European publics informed about military operations, but also counteract deliberate efforts by the Serbian government to use state-controlled media coverage to undercut public support for the NATO campaign. He retired from the Air Force in 1999 as a colonel.

Prior to joining the Department of State, Crowley was a senior fellow with the Center for American Progress, with a particular policy focus on homeland security and combating terrorism in ways that are consistent with the rule of law, and can sustain long-term public support.

The Omar Bradley Chair is a joint initiative among the United States Army War College, Dickinson College and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs. Its objective is to advance the study of strategic leadership and enhance civilian-military dialogue by offering distinguished individuals the opportunity to contribute to the educational and research activities of the partner institutions. Previous chair-holders include former director of national intelligence and retired United States Navy four-star Admiral Dennis Blair and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist Rick Atkinson.

WDCV Radio Interview with P.J. Crowley on 10/25/11